HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New (14 msgs / 368 lines)
1) From: Randy & Debbie B.
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hello from Canada:
I am new to this list, and would like to know if anyone can give me some
tips on what is the most economical way to try Home Roasting my own beans.
At this point, I have no roaster or beans, but would like to try it just
once to know whether or not to spend the money on a roaster. (We have been
grinding our own already roasted beans that we buy at Costco, and find them
much better than already ground coffee)
Can anyone help me get started?
Debbie

2) From: Photogal1966
The cheapest way to start (and how I got hooked) is just to simply roast them 
in a pan on your stovetop.
Some people like to roast in the oven, too. Look over the Sweet Maria's site, 
and you will find a lot of helpful information.
Andrea
(going back into lurk mode, preparing for her vacation in New Orleans this 
weekend)

3) From: Dave Huddle
Debbie
I started CHEAP with a borrowed WestBend Poppery II and a few small
samples of beans from SweetMarias.   I was hooked immediately!!!
Tom has good info. on using the Poppery on his web sitehttp://sweetmarias.com/airpopmethod.htmlI returned the borrowed popcorn popper and bought a new one for under
$20 (could probably have obained one at a garage sale or Goodwill store
for MUCH less).   Indoor roasting with a popper is a little messy, but
with a little work (fan in the kitchen window, big bowl to catch the
chaff, collander to cool the beans) you can get it done inexpensively.
If you find you enjoy your homeroasted beans, then maybe you'll get a
HearthWare Precision, a FreshRoast, a Heartware Gourmet, a 'wb' roaster
(if you can still find one), and an AlpenRost.  (I don't have a Caffe
Rosto, nor have I ordered a HotTop roaster - yet).
On second thought, STOP NOW!  before you go crazy $pending money on
roa$ter$, brewer$, e$pre$$o machine$, etc. like some of us on the
list.
Dave    Westerville, OH         just 25 minutes from SweetMarias
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: JKG
Debbie,
Go to Tom's library and start reading:http://www.sweetmarias.com/instruct.basic.htmlClick on all of the links for "Sweet Maria's
Coffee Roasting Tip Sheets."
There's a wealth of information there.  Have fun!
When you're done, be sure and buy your coffee beans
from sweetmarias.
A satisfied customer,
JKG

5) From: Jim Gundlach
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On Thursday, May 23, 2002, at 07:17 AM, Randy & Debbie B. wrote:
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Debbie,
     The most important thing is to get good beans.  The first time I 
tried home roasting I roasted some green beans I bought at the 
International Food Market in Atlanta, Ga.  I later concluded that they 
were robusta and I was so unhappy with the results that I did not try 
roasting again for more than two years.  The beans available from 
Sweetmaria's are among the best in the world for quite reasonable 
prices.  If you have a wok, or a large frying pan, and a large metal 
spoon and a place where you can cook without worrying about the smoke, 
you don't need anything but the beans and a grinder.  If you decide to 
go this way, let me know and I'll provide some more detailed 
instructions.  With a little additional cost, go the hot-air popcorn 
popper route.  It is a little easier but you lose some information about 
what is happening in the roasting process.
     Jim Gundlach
     roasting over pecan wood fires
    in La Place, Alabama
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On Thursday, May 23, 2002, at 07:17 AM, Randy & Debbie B. wrote:
ArialCan anyone help me
get started?
Debbie,
    The most important thing is to get good beans.  The first time I
tried home roasting I roasted some green beans I bought at the
International Food Market in Atlanta, Ga.  I later concluded that they
were robusta and I was so unhappy with the results that I did not try
roasting again for more than two years.  The beans available from
Sweetmaria's are among the best in the world for quite reasonable
prices.  If you have a wok, or a large frying pan, and a large metal
spoon and a place where you can cook without worrying about the smoke,
you don't need anything but the beans and a grinder.  If you decide to
go this way, let me know and I'll provide some more detailed
instructions.  With a little additional cost, go the hot-air popcorn
popper route.  It is a little easier but you lose some information
about what is happening in the roasting process.  
    Jim Gundlach
    roasting over pecan wood fires
   in La Place, Alabama
--Apple-Mail-1-908629866--
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: Charlie Herlihy
  >Hello from Canada:>I am new to this list, and would like to know if anyone can give me some tips on what is the >most economical way to try Home Roasting my own beans. >At this point, I have no roaster or beans, but would like to try it just once to know whether or not >to spend the money on a roaster. (We have been grinding our own already roasted beans that >we buy at Costco, and find them much better than already ground coffee) >Can anyone help me get started? >DebbieHi Debbie, and welcome.  Do you live in an apartment in a city where smoke will bother the neighbors and landlord?  If you even have a little yard where you can use a barbecue there are other options besides the airpoppers that most list participants use, and which work well too judging from what I read here.  The old fashioned shake over coals popcorn poppers work real well too, with a little practice. A first try with a small amount of beans in a cast iron frying pan will give you some idea how much better than stale costco beans your homeroast can be. You have to be prepared for smoke, tilt the pan a little over the heat source so you can keep scooping the beans  with a big mouthed spoon and stirring them-good oven mitts, eh?, and a colinder handy to cool  them when when done. Ther's a ton of info in the homeroast archives, lots of laughs, too. Since there are specialty roasteries popping up all over Canada these days it's likely that a freindly roaster will sell you some green beans to play with, then order the really good stuff from Sweet Marias. There's no other company as dependable for having the real qualiy.    Good luck,      Charlie                       brick oven roasting in grand forks, B.C.
---------------------------------
Do You Yahoo!?
LAUNCH - Your Yahoo! Music Experience

7) From: M. McCandless
Hello all,
I'm new here & new to roasting.
Got an FR+8 for Christmas.
I managed to make about 3 lbs of plant food in
the quest to create drinkable coffee.
Now that I no longer have plants, I can
devote all my spare time to roasting.
The FR baked coffee in about 4 mins & made
anything but drinkable coffee for a week or so,
after which it wouldn't even get to 1st crack.
(thermal cutout opening early).
After much research, I now use a computer pwr supply to control fan & 
Variac to control temp (thermal cutout disabled).
The few graphic profiles were very helpful & I now entering
into "WOW, What great coffee!" phase (I like it a little on the
darker side).
I plan to start creating graphic records of the successful profiles.
The Hottop looks line it may be a good next step - any input?
Thanks,
McSparky

8) From: Brett Mason
Welcome to the magical world of home roasting!  Can we call you Torch?
My approach is much more basic than perhaps you are asking...
  Have you tried skillet roasting where you can control the temperature and
the folding-over of the beans?  This will get you completely "hands-on" in
the process, even if just to help with the "feel" for the roasting curve,
etc.
  Have you considered a popcorn popper from a thrift store?  This is how I
started, and the low entry fee meant I could torch the thing, roast on an
angle, try extension cords, and various other techniques without much cost
and without much risk along the way.
So, I would recommend you work on the techniques to hone in on what looks
most promising for you, and then spend the money on such a roaster.  For me
this ended up at a SS drum on a rotisserie in the BBQ on the porch...  And
you should see the flames when it goes far too far!!!
Brett
  Zassman
On 3/25/06, M. McCandless  wrote:
<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

9) From: Steve Hay
M,
No input.  However, I would be interested in more technical details of your
roast setup and pics if you've got them.. It sounds interesting...
Personally, if you are having fun with your custom setup I'd stick with tha=
t
for a while before upgrading to a Hottop, but from what I hear there are
excellent machines, albeit not fluid bed air roasting, so the flavors you
get might be different.
Steve
On 3/25/06, M. McCandless  wrote:
<Snip>
--
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
A Little Fable
by Franz Kafka
"Alas," said the mouse, "the whole world is growing smaller every day. At
the beginning it was so big that I was afraid, I kept running and running,
and I was glad when I saw walls far away to the right and left, but these
long walls have narrowed so quickly that I am in the last chamber already,
and there in the corner stands the trap that I must run into." "You only
need to change your direction," said the cat, and ate it up.

10) From: M. McCandless
Here's the setup:http://www.getnet.com/~mikemc/java.htmlI'm at a point that i feel comfortable.
Now that I have a good baseline, I am in the fine-tuning zone.
So far 80V is a start - brings bean temp up to 360 - 400 in 4 to 7 mins,
depending on the bean.
Raising voltage to 85 will bring temp up to 1st crack & proceed to 2nd
within about 3 mins.
More stubborn beans require a higher 2nd setting of 90V - 95V at which
runaway occurs past 450 of so if not closely monitored.
Input much appreciated,
McSparky (I think I'll stick with McSpaaarrrky - compliments of my fellow Namvets)
AKA Yosemite McSam
At 08:49 AM 3/25/2006 -0600, you wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Espressoperson
The FR+8 was my first roaster. Used it for almost a year before moving  to a 
hottop - a very easy way to roast a half pound at a time. The main  reason for 
the upgrade was that it turned into a lot of work to do all that  flipping 
back and forth between on and off and cool to control the profile  for just a 
couple of ounces of coffee at a time. But if you've split fan and  heater you 
may be able to increase the batch size and keep from upgrading for  awhile.
 
MichaelB
 
In a message dated 3/25/2006 9:32:31 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
mikemc writes:
...
After much research, I now use a computer pwr supply to  control fan & 
Variac to control temp (thermal cutout  disabled).
The few graphic profiles were very helpful & I now  entering
into "WOW, What great coffee!" phase (I like it a little on  the
darker side).
I plan to start creating graphic records of the  successful profiles.
The Hottop looks line it may be a good next step -  any input?
Thanks,
McSparky

12) From: Bernard Gerrard
The discovery of Sweet Maria's website is one of the best finds ever.  
Tom's travelogs are better than 99.5% of the offerings on TV.  Love the 
folk art and doors.  That is how I like to travel.  My own personal 
favorite was finding the "Comedor Sagrada Corazon de Jesus" in Guatemala.
I like a good plain cuppa and will never aspire to High Coffee and the 
appurtenances that requires.  I thought I knew something about coffee 
until the Sweet Maria's site which set me at the Iron Age level.  The 
offerings of local roasters was as much as I aspired to with some good 
and some bad.
An order was placed for some beans, a Sampler,  but alas, my corn popper 
was of the antique variety.  Finding a suitable hot air machine required 
visiting four department stores.  I was in a hurry.  The learning curve 
was quick and doing it out doors eliminated the chaff and smoke 
problem.  The result was just great......a revelation.  The nuances in 
the descriptions are really there!
My feeble attempts to find good coffee,  "Point of Origin", are as follows:
1.  Years and years and years ago in Puerto Rico. Coffee made from the 
plants growing by the door. Fabulous and still remembered.
2.   Recently.  From several areas of Costa Rica;  Monte Verde, and 
around Arenal.....good.
3.   Oaxaca, Mexico.  Purchased roasted beans in a high volume 
Supermercado.  High volume=fresher?  Not.  Flat and dreary.
3.    Guatemala (Flores).  Tried to find Guatemalan coffee on an 
overnight from Belize.  Apparently as scarce as Luwak coffee in that 
locale.  The brewed stuff offered was fiercely-bad.  A raffish retired 
North American ex-pat "recommended" this place and its brew as "The 
Best".   We found out that his coffee was fortified with 25% v/v 
Nicaraguan rum.  As Liza said,  "He knew the good of it."
4.  Coffee labeled as from Belize (airport shop).  I found that hard to 
believe and at $US12.00, turned cheap, having already pumped ample $$ 
into the local economy.
                                    ------Bernard C. Gerrard

13) From: Jared Andersson
Welcome to the list Bernard.  Like you said I am also very happy I stumbled
upon Sweetmarias website and this list.  I have found no better supplier of
coffee, provider of coffee information and spreader of good will elsewhere.
By roasting your own high quality beans and being able to taste nuances you
are already at "High Coffee"  Now it is about finding the roast method and
beans that fit your wants and needs best.  Jared
On 12/12/06, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
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14) From: Eddie Dove
Bernard,
Welcome to the list!
Eddie
On 12/12/06, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
<Snip>


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