HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee plants (149 msgs / 3211 lines)
1) From: Chris Hardenbrook
Flowers will come from the lateral branches in the second year, usually Jan or Feb. Prune that puppy at about the 40 inch mark after your first year and new vertical stems will pop out; keep it to about four or five of these new verticals.  Then, the new laterals from these new stems will flower and fruit.
Chris in Hilo

2) From: Chris Hardenbrook
Coffee bonzai would be VERY cool.  After ten years you could harvest a cup full of very tiny beans each year and make a single demitasse!  SPECIAL!
Chris in Hilo is LOL

3) From: Chris Hardenbrook
Hi Paul,
You probably won't get any significant cherry from your plant, but it is nice to know you are treating it as family! My cat won't kill mice, but we love her anyway!
The pruning advice is aimed more at maximizing cherry production, and if you are not going to be reaping a harvest, you can shape the plant to please your eye.  The point of pruning in the coffee patch is to get as many flowers as possible and have them develop into as much fruit as possible.  Since the flowers come out on lateral branches emerging from the vertical stems, young plants are typically topped in the first year or two.  This pruning is at about waist height.  The stem will then sprout new vertical stems from the stump.  You will cull these new verticals to allow the growth of only three or four or five of them.  These verical stems will produce lateral branches and this is where the flowers will appear.  So, the first pruning (topping) is done to increase the number of flower-bearing lateral branches.
Does this help?
Chris in Hilo

4) From: Steve Baragona
Kent Pierce wrote:
<Snip>
    My sister got me some coffee seeds for Christmas.  I was going to start
farming coffee,but I read that you probably won't get them to bear fruit as
houseplants.  I live in North Carolina, so I seriously doubt the outdoor
growing conditions here are anything like they would be on a mountaintop in
Guatemala.  But apparently they do make very pretty houseplants.  I haven't
planted the seeds yet.
Steve B.

5) From: Kent Pierce
 
For those interested in the horticultural side of homeroasting:
I spotted some coffee plants at a Franks Nursery and Craft store in the 
Chicago area. Franks stores can be found from the Great Lakes states to the 
East Coast and New England so these should be available to many on the 
list. I bought three $3 pots, and each contained about a dozen separate 
plants ranging from seedlings to some with 8-10 leaves. I now have a 
veritable plantation! By December, the plants ought to be big enough to be 
used as holiday gifts for people who think I'm already too obsessed with 
coffee... what fun!
....................Kent

6) From: Michael Allen Smith
<Snip>
I was able to take a 6 inch Kona plant and grow it to 5 feet tall inside the
DC beltway.  Just prior to moving to San Diego last week, I donated the
plant to my neighborhood Starbucks.  (There are 26 Starbucks in Northern
Virgina and to my knowledge no good local cafes).  Anyone in the area can go
to the Starbucks in the Mark Center shopping center in Alexandria and view
it in the front window.  The employees are taking very good care of the
plant.
I need to update my Kona story.http://ineedcoffee.com/content/1999/11/kato_kona.aspKona won.
mas

7) From: Prabhakar Ragde
<Snip>
I will refrain from making any "hot air" remarks. --PR

8) From: John Wanninger
<Snip>
the
<Snip>
<Snip>
Nor will I make any comments about the abundance of "fertilizer".
John

9) From: Michael Allen Smith
<Snip>
start
<Snip>
as
<Snip>
in
<Snip>
haven't
<Snip>
My was indoor next to a large window.
mas

10) From: Bryce Decker
Message text written by INTERNET:homeroast
<Snip>
    My sister got me some coffee seeds for Christmas.  I was going to start
farming coffee,but I read that you probably won't get them to bear fruit as
houseplants.  I live in North Carolina, so I seriously doubt the outdoor
growing conditions here are anything like they would be on a mountaintop in
Guatemala.  But apparently they do make very pretty houseplants.  I haven't
planted the seeds yet.
Steve B.
<
Steve,
        Don't expect miracles in the cup, but you can get those trees to
produce fruit in northern climes.  Just keep them away from frost.  Last
year a friend brought me some green coffee he had processed from a tree
grown in front of a living room picture window in Winnipeg.  It looked like
coffee, smelled like coffee when it was roasting and even had a bit of
coffee flavor.  
        -Bryce

11) From: Ken Wilson
<Snip>
A neighbour has one in his north facing front room (South coast of
England) - six foot tall. Flowered and bore seed.  I "persuaded"him to let
me pick, skin and roast.  Umm....  - well it was fun!
How that dancing goatherd and his monks ever found that the stuff was
pleasant to drink without proper washing, drying terraces, handpicked beans,
a good supplier to cup for you, HWP, Rockys and gaggias beats me.
ken

12) From: Michael Vanecek
<Snip>
I have a few seeds of Kona in pots (my supplier was kind enough to send
me not-quite-dry parchment). I hope that the fermentation process didn't
kill them and that they sprout - we'll see.
Don't expect to get a good cup of coffee from these living-room trees.
We can simulate their natural environment only so far. They're used to
much more light than they can get in the northern and southern
latitudes, grow at higher altitudes that are cool but still tropical and
usually in a jungle ecosystem that no doubt contributes to the quality
of the cup... but the plants sure are pretty.
Mike

13) From: Eric Bear Albrecht
 
At 5:10 PM -0500 6/7/00, Michael Vanecek wrote:
<Snip>
I suppose you could do grow lights, but of course you'd be bothered by
the occasional swat team.  And they'd probably confisticate your plants
just when they were about to produce something.
;B
-- 
         Eric Bear Albrecht     ebear            Box 6040
                        http://www.roastbusters.org/ebear         The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words
         when one will do.                               -Thomas Jefferson

14) From: Michael Cox
------
My sister got me some coffee seeds for Christmas.  I was going to start
farming coffee,but I read that you probably won't get them to bear fruit as
houseplants.  I live in North Carolina, so I seriously doubt the outdoor
growing conditions here are anything like they would be on a mountaintop in
Guatemala.  But apparently they do make very pretty houseplants.  I haven't
planted the seeds yet.
Steve B.
------
I got some for Christmas, too...but they're robusta. :(
Haven't planted mine, yet, either.
Michael Cox
Sent via Newton Technology  "Ink Different"http://www.lp.org    Vote Different!

15) From: Hugh Solaas
I have a room with 16ft. ceilings and glass top to bottom on the sunny side.
EVERYTHING  I grow in this room thrives.  I'd like to give growing a coffee
plant a try here, based on the reports of success from the list.
Does anyone know what varietal looks the best  growing in a living room (I
suspect it's robusta, and I live AT sea level), and where I might make such
a purchase?
Thanks!
--Hugh

16) From: Tom & Maria
<Snip>
Arabica coffee plants are widely available at nurseries and gardening
centers. I have bought different types. Some of them that were labeled
coffea arabica at a big hardware superstore ...I am not so sure about them.
Then I have bought some that werent labeled and I am sure they are Typica
arabica. The ones I got at a really good nursery are definitly typica
arabica. Look for darker green leaves and a sort of cerrated edge along the
sides of the leaves. The ones I question look more like a Ficus Benjamina,
smooth edges, lighter leaf color.
Tom
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To send a reply to Sweet Maria's, please send the email to tom
DO NOT send the Reply to sweetmaria or we might not see it for weeks!
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             * Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting Supplies *
                  Tom and Maria * tom
                     web:http://sweetmarias.com

17) From: Bryce Decker
Hugh,
        Why don't you order some coffee from one of the three or four dozen
Kona coffee farmers who retail their own coffee on the internet and ask
them as an extra small favor  to include for planting a handful of coffee
seeds still in parchment (unmilled).  Arabica coffee is a beautiful small
tree with glossy , wavy edged leaves  for the living room and will tolerate
low elevations OK.  More at DeckerBandS   -Bryce

18) From: Mandy Willison
Hi Hugh
<Snip>
I live on the beach and have arabica trees
bean'wild!

19) From: Mandy Willison
I forgot to add that this is Australia where award winning beans have taken
out European prizes so my comment of sea level trees may not apply in
Seattle
bean'wild!

20) From: Hugh Solaas
Thanks, all, for the timely tips on coffee plants.  Tom, I'm amazed that
they sell real coffee plants in nurseries -- I'll check them out!
Bryan and Mandy, how large are your arabica plants?   Mandy, do you grow
yours outside or inside?
I want a 10 ft. coffee bush in my living room.
-H.

21) From: Norm Szcyrek
Hmm...this brings up a question to my mind. Would it make a difference if
the coffee beans were wet or dry processed?
On Thu, 8 Jun 2000 16:11:02 -0400, homeroast wrote:
<Snip>
dozen
<Snip>
tolerate
<Snip>
virtually,
Norm Szcyrek
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visithttp://freelane.excite.com/freeisp

22) From: Bearhair
Tom & Maria  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
   The International Coffee Organization has a page with coffee plant info:http://www.ico.org/botanic.htm   Another site is the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center which has the book:
Insect Pollination Of Cultivated Crop Plants by S.E. McGregor, USDA, Originally
published 1976 and "The First and Only Virtual Beekeeping Book Updated
Continously":http://gears.tucson.ars.ag.gov/book/chap7/coffee.html   This is from a simple web search on
      "coffee arabica" botany
   I found a plant in a 5" pot at a Frank's Nursery and Crafts in the
Chicagoland area ($5.99). It's about 8" tall from the dirt and has 16 stems,
several whose unfurling leaves still have unshed parchment. Would each stem
eventually be planted as a coffee bush?
   It's branded "Exotic Angel", which according tohttp://www.exoticangel.com/is from the Hermann Engelmann Greenhouses in Apopka, Florida (just north of
Orlando). They claim to be a well-known brand.

23) From: Bryce Decker
Message text written by INTERNET:homeroast
<Snip>
<Snip>
dozen
<Snip>
coffee
<Snip>
small
<Snip>
tolerate
<Snip>
virtually,
Norm Szcyrek<
No, Norm.,  wet processing doesn't kill coffee seeds unless there was a
screw up in the fermenting tank and the temperature got too high.  The
washing process removes the sweet outer cherry skin and then leaves the
seeds ("beans") in a water bath to ferment for about 12 hours mainly to
loosen the sweet mucilaginous pulp that still adheres to the seeds.  In the
tub, after natural yeasts have worked on the pulp for about 12 hours, they
can be washed clean and dried more efficiently and without the risk of
mouldy fermenting that would give the coffee a rotten fruit taste.  At this
stage the seeds are inside a brittle hull, called 'parchment", that must be
removed in a second milling to produce the "green" coffee ready for
roasting.  If you are going to plant the seeds, you will want them still
inside this parchment hull.
        Coffee roasters and dealers like Tom ordinarily do not have such
"parchment coffee" in their stocks.  You have to go to the source country
for it, as a rule.  It would be well to obtain seeds that are not too old
to increase the liklehood of germination.
        Dry processing gives less quality control because the whole
cherries are dried like raisins in the sun.  And yes, the seeds inside such
dried coffee fruit should certainly be viable, again, if they are not too
old.  
        Remember that coffee seeds take seemingly forever to germinate. 
Don't give up on them until at least two months have passed without
germination, by which time you can probably assume the seeds were dead to
begin with
                -Bryce

24) From: Michael Vanecek
Excellent - I feel much better. I was afraid that the light fermenting
these beans get to remove the fruit would be too much. I ordered mine
from Cea at Smith Farms from a just-harvested batch still in parchment
that hadn't fully dried. Kone coffee beans sure do look pretty. Anyway,
they've been in dirt for a little over a week and I used a brief (15
minutes) soaking in Super Thrive to help in the germination. I put them
into translucent plastic cups in a mixture of 1/3 vermiculite, 1/3
potting soil and 1/3 peat that is kept wet but not soaked. To preserve
moisture and keep humidity high, I taped translucent cups to the top and
to prevent mold and fungus and to facilitate watering of the seeds I
drilled a 1/2 inch hole in the top of the cover cup (actually the
bottom, but it's upside down now). Naturally, I drilled a little hole in
the bottom of the assembly to prevent water-logging. They get moderate
sun from a west facing window (I planted 12 of them). We'll see how they
do. I ended up with two pounds of the stuff (approximately 4200 beans
still in parchment), so I'll probably start removing the parchment on
some and roasting up a batch or two while I wait...
Mike
<Snip>

25) From: Anthony Ottman
<Snip>
That ought to give the rest of 'em some motivation to germinate quickly!
8*D

26) From: Glen Sutherland
Light?
Water?
Fertilizer?
Does anyone else have plants?
I gave away coffee plants this year for Christmas, but I'm not sure I really
know the best care instructions.
Peace,
Glen
AIM:rdawkin994homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

27) From:
I had one several years ago, but I have the "kiss-of-death" thumb instead of
the green one.  However, it's a supposedly robust plant that will thrive in
the same environments as normal house plants, or so I was told; I've killed
cacti before, and I think the plastic plant is wilting...
I was also told not to expect beans, though, unless you duplicate
"hot-house" environments,  particularly the humidity and temperature ranges
you would find in coffee-growing regions.

28) From: Fleetdiet
       It seems to me that SM would do well to "include" (cost plus profit) a 
coffee plant with the purchase of X amount of green beans.  The plant would 
represent the same "bean" as was purchased.  The idea of having the plant 
among the other decor within a retail coffee establishment just seems 
natural.  In terms of the plants care, let's imagine we know how to use the 
computor do discern this information.  Should SM not be interested in selling 
plants as they have enough to deal with, perhaps the interested party(s) can 
hit up their local florist...... ? 

29) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
--Apple-Mail-1--561671233
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	format=flowed
On Wednesday, January 2, 2002, at 01:19 , Glen Sutherland wrote:
<Snip>
I have a couple of coffee plants given to me by the friend who also 
gives me all the cherries (which are beginning to come onto the trees at 
the moment) from the trees at his nature park.  They get water and not 
too much direct sunlight but of course they are in a hot and humid 
environment so need little care.  Adapting them to a non-coffee growing 
area might need some investigation - regular water spray would be a must.
Wendy
  Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/ans/fax 230 6257399
Mobile 230 2560182
--Apple-Mail-1--561671233
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charset-ASCII
On Wednesday, January 2, 2002, at 01:19 , Glen Sutherland wrote:
Light?
Water?
Fertilizer?
Does anyone else have plants?
I gave away coffee plants this year for Christmas, but I'm not sure I
really
know the best care instructions.
I have a couple of coffee plants given to me by the friend who also
gives me all the cherries (which are beginning to come onto the trees
at the moment) from the trees at his nature park.  They get water and
not too much direct sunlight but of course they are in a hot and humid
environment so need little care.  Adapting them to a non-coffee
growing area might need some investigation - regular water spray would
be a must.
Wendy
 HelveticaWendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/ans/fax 230 6257399
Mobile 230 2560182
--Apple-Mail-1--561671233--
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

30) From: Paul Goelz
At 11:49 AM 1/2/02 +0400, you wrote:
<Snip>
 On Wednesday, January 2, 2002, at 01:19 , Glen Sutherland wrote:
Light?
Water?
Fertilizer?
Does anyone else have plants?
I gave away coffee plants this year for Christmas, but I'm not sure I really
know the best care instructions.
I have a couple of coffee plants given to me by the friend who also gives
me all the cherries (which are beginning to come onto the trees at the
moment) from the trees at his nature park.  They get water and not too much
direct sunlight but of course they are in a hot and humid environment so
need little care.  Adapting them to a non-coffee growing area might need
some investigation - regular water spray would be a must.
<<<<
I have two plants I bought over a year ago.  They do fine if you keep them
watered and do not let the leaves wilt.  They lived in a north facing bay
window for a year and did OK although they did not grow very fast.  This
summer I put them out on the deck 24/7 and they started to grow faster.  I
fed them every week or two with 50% strength house plant food.  
I can say from direct experience that they do NOT like frost or cats.
Unfortunately, the cats like THEM....
<Snip>
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
pgoelz at eaglequest dot com
Videoastronomy, music (UnFest) and electric helicopter site:http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.eaglequest.com/~pgoelzhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

31) From: David Waterfill
Frank's Nursery and Crafts had plants before Christmas.  The two I got are
very healthy with three or four plants in each pot.  I have tried many times
to sprout seeds with no luck, although there are a few who have succeeded.
It supposedly takes 3 to 4 months for a seed to sprout.
As far as getting beans a lady in California was harvesting beans (not many)
on her 4 year plant.  It is said a coffee tree will not bloom before its
fourth year.
My only worry is the pruning.  These plants will get huge without proper
pruning.  I may have to get a book on how to prune.
David Waterfill
dwaterfi
dwaterfill
WWW.Spacestar.net/users/dwaterfi
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

32) From: jim gundlach
For good instructions on taking care of coffee plants, and about any 
others, go to:
    http://www.plantcare.comThen click search by plant name and look for coffee, or any other plant 
you are interested in.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
near Shorter, Alabama with a little snow on the ground.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

33) From: Ed Needham
I think you have to think like a coffee plant on the perfect plantation.
A Hawaiian Kona farm comes to mind with coffee trees growing in dark,
rich fertile soil, on a cool, fog covered, misty morning mountainside.
The temperature gradually warms to a perfect 75-80 degrees on a
perfectly clear, sunny day. A moist balmy breeze wisps through the
branches and protective shade is provided by surrounding trees and
growth.  If you can create that in your home, you'll have a happy coffee
plant.
Regards,
Ed Needham
ed
<Snip>
I
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

34) From: Doug Cadmus
<Snip>
And the ideal vacation spot!
Look at the money you'll save on airfare, accommodations, rentals...  all
in the privacy of your own home!
-deCadmus
Doug E Cadmus
decadmus
www.bloggle.com/coffee
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

35) From: Gary Zimmerman
Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>
And a happy home, no doubt!
-- garyZ
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

36) From: Doug Cadmus
<Snip>
Volcano? No. Dante's Peak? Yes. [The coffee subplot makes the difference.]
Of course, you really need to have on-hand a serious Dolby 5.1 [or better]
system... it's the subsonic volcanic rumble that makes the coffee plants
feel at home. ;)
-deCadmus
 Doug E Cadmus
 decadmus
 www.bloggle.com/coffee
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

37) From: Robert Cantor
dogs really "dig" those coffee plants, too.  Seems like they'll tolerate
anything but being dug up by the roots and played with by dogs.  These are
the same dogs who wouldn't touch a steak if I told them not to, but couldn't
keep their paws out of the coffee tree pot.  They never bothered the citrus,
figs or other plants.  go figure...
Bob C.
rcantor

38) From: Robert Cantor
First you have to set off a volcano in your living room...
Bob C.
rcantor

39) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Robert Cantor" 
<Snip>
Does the movie "Volcano" on DVD count?! MM;-)
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

40) From: Doug Cadmus
<Snip>
Well that only leaves us with the inevitable Linda Hamilton / Ann Heche
comparos, or Tommy Lee Jones / Pierce Brosnan, depending upon one's point
of view. Actually, the point of view is somewhat muddied by... ah,
nevermind. See why I didn't want to go here?
How 'bout Joe vs. the Volcano? Tom and Meg. Happiness.
And anyway, where I *really* want that volcano is in my garage, where I'm
roasting. It was only 40 degrees in there today.
-deCadmus
Doug E Cadmus
decadmus
www.bloggle.com/coffee
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

41) From: Timothy A Reed
On Wed, 2 Jan 2002 18:35:29 -0600 "Doug Cadmus" 
writes:
<Snip>
Dante's Peak??  Yes, it *did* have a coffee reference, but it was really
a sorry excuse for a movie...
-Tim
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

42) From: JKG
<Snip>
where I'm
<Snip>
Eight degrees here yesterday, and I'm still roasting with the HWG
in an open garage.  I never thought it would be able to do it.
Even my original Poppery needed a cardboard box at these temps.
JKG
south-central Wisconsin
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

43) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Doug Cadmus" 
<Snip>
I always go DTS over Dolby 5.1 when available. Yes, the low end makes our cushy reclining loveseat
vibrate. It's not what you hear but what you feel... makes a big difference. Mine's a low end
Audiophile setup IMO but it gets the job done. THX certified Miller & Kriesel (M&K) LR C LR-Rear 5.1
with M&K duel 12" push-pull powered sub. (George Lucas has M&K's in his Home Theatre, a step or two
up from my models of course...) Driven by Denon AVR-3801 100x7w though I'm running 5.1 not 6.1. Use
the other 2 amps(secondary surround channels) for multi-source speaker power - spa, bedroom, garage,
computer room, deck, front for Christmas etc.
Love classical music with the lights out at concert level. Concert level meaning where the conductor
stands... Violins sing and kettle drums thunder. 1812 just fabulous. Dvorak New World one of my
fav's. Also really Rocks with the best of 'em! Or how about Mannheim Steamroller, my favorite
Christmas music.
Coffee's not my only passion!
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

44) From: Timothy A Reed
On Wed, 2 Jan 2002 19:22:05 -0800 "Mike McGinness" 
writes:
<Snip>
Ah, yes; the cannons really bang loud when powered by the 220w Sansui
that drives the subwoofer. :)
I have a really good performance by Georg Solti, but I want to get the
Jarve rendition, with the choral portions...
-Tim
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

45) From: AlChemist John
After just over 2 months of tending, I have three coffee seeding starting 
to push up.  Two of the ones from Wendy, and a Brazilian from SM.  I really 
hope some of the test Jampit come up.
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

46) From: Michael Vanecek
That's really cool. I always figured milled coffee would be too bruised 
to be viable - plus the environment some are stored during shipping can 
affect viability too. I've ordered fresh parchment from a Kona farmer in 
Hawaii and sprouted those. Normally it takes a while for them to 
germinate - I put a handful of parchment into wet paper towels and 
stuffed that in a ziplock baggie and left in subdued light - they had 
roots coming out within 30 days! I was tickled. Hmmm, now my next SM 
order is going to be for planting. :) I'd recommend getting coffee that 
doesn't normally sit in hot box-cars - which would rule out most of the 
African coffees. Though it can't hurt to try. Coffee seedlings like a 
constantly moist (not waterlogged) organically rich compost. Never let 
it dry out. I've killed more seedlings that way. I've also innoculated 
mine with mycorrhizal fungus - makes it easier for them to survive, 
especially in pots. My cacao theobroma would not be alive but for that 
symbiotic fungus. And coffee likes it coolish - if it's comfortable to 
you it's comfortable for it. Spritzing with water occasionally will help 
- but as long as the compost is always moist it should have enough 
humidity. Bright but relatively indirect light is good. Some sun ain't 
bad - just watch for scalding. I've heard that coffee plants don't like 
radical environmental change (like moving to another room or house) all 
that much either - but I've yet to experience that yet. Mycorrhizal 
fungus makes the plant much stronger, so that's probably why.
Have fun,
Mike
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://dotfile.net/- Dedicated to Open Source Software
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

47) From: Michael Vanecek
If I remember correctly, it'll take about three or four years for the 
little seedling to get to bearing size. But they're such beautiful 
plants anyway! Hmmm, wonder if any animals here will eat the cherries... 
 Hee - home made Kopi Luak! :)
SeeYa,
Mike
susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://dotfile.net/- Dedicated to Open Source Software
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

48) From: Michael Vanecek
I was thinking about taking about six of them and bonsai training them 
using a modified traditional Kona pruning style and setting them up in a 
tray as a bonsai coffee plantation. Hmmm, maybe the inclusion of a 
taller bonsai "shade" tree would enhance the effect? I expect them to 
max out at about 3' with bonsai maintenance...
Have fun,
Mike
susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://dotfile.net/- Dedicated to Open Source Software
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

49) From: EskWIRED
<Snip>
Wow.  After your harvest, you could brew them into little tiny demitasse
cups and...
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

50) From: dewardh
Mike:
<Snip>
Where do you get your fungus ? ? ?  I'd expect at least some "species 
specificity" (what works for Pine doesn't work for Rhododendron, for example), 
and would also expect at least a little "difficulty" getting unfumigated soil 
samples from Sumatra or Yemen or Columbia . . .  . . . (I wonder if one 
could propagate from root cuttings ? ? ?).
You're absolutely correct about the importance of appropriate soil symbiants 
(and "healthy" soil in general . . .), and not just for coffee.
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

51) From: Michael Vanecek
I get my innoculant fromhttp://www.tandjenterprises.com/and I've also 
seenhttp://www.bio-organics.com/recommended. A search of Google will 
no doubt pull up a dozen other sources. The collections of mycorrhazea 
in these innoculants are chosen for their generic host nature and can 
innoculate a wide variety of plants. Most Glomus sp. works well on 
caffea arabica, it seems. I think the primary species in the Biovam is 
glomus intraradices though they also include other species to widen the 
host range, plus some ectomycorrhizal species and azotobactar helper 
bacteria. Pines, Oaks, Pecans, etc host ectomycorrhizal fungus. 90%+ of 
plants form mycorrhizal relationships - some require it for survival and 
the vast majority host endomycorrhizal fungus. If you use it, you'll 
need to use organic methods of cultivation - chemicals like fertilizers, 
pesticides and herbicides can harm and kill the fungus which, IMHO, is 
why most of our agriculture is now heavily dependant on fertilizers and 
pesticides just for survival.
Hope that helps. Most of my chocolate trees - cacao theobroma var 
forestero - died before I learned of their dependancy on mycorrhizal 
fungus. The last two were sticks - two weeks after innoculation, new 
growth and a month after the plants were growing like weeds. I've since 
had to prune them periodically and repot them into larger containers - 
they're growing now as they should in nature or a healthy sustainably 
cultivated plantation. Many of the coffees we enjoy from Tom are grown 
using sustainable techniques simply because it's economical - those 
fertilizers are expensive for poor underpaid farmers - and as a side 
effect, these trees have natural mycorrhizal colonies that are lacking 
or vastly reduced in crop-style mass cultivated and chemically 
fertilized trees. Healthier trees means better coffee. Yum...
But - for those so inclined, let's not start a flame war over the hot 
topic of organic vs non-organic - if you disagree, let's agree to 
disagree right here and now and leave it at that. What I use works for 
me. I'm happy with it. If you feel like flaming, use my private address 
and not the list please. I'm happy with the wonderful coffee I drink 
from Tom - much admittedly cultivated using conventional agriculture 
much sustainable and some certified organic. All I can say is yum.
Cheers,
Mike
dewardh wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://dotfile.net/- Dedicated to Open Source Software
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

52) From: Tad Preston
Mike,
I am not familiar with the bonsai process, would the coffee trees still produce fruit?
Tad
 Michael Vanecek  wrote:I was thinking about taking about six of them and bonsai training them 
using a modified traditional Kona pruning style and setting them up in a 
tray as a bonsai coffee plantation. Hmmm, maybe the inclusion of a 
taller bonsai "shade" tree would enhance the effect? I expect them to 
max out at about 3' with bonsai maintenance...
Have fun,
Mike
susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://dotfile.net/- Dedicated to Open Source Software
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Y! Web Hosting - Let the expert host your web site

53) From: Tad Preston
Mike,
I am not familiar with the bonsai process, would the coffee trees still produce fruit?
Tad
 Michael Vanecek  wrote:I was thinking about taking about six of them and bonsai training them 
using a modified traditional Kona pruning style and setting them up in a 
tray as a bonsai coffee plantation. Hmmm, maybe the inclusion of a 
taller bonsai "shade" tree would enhance the effect? I expect them to 
max out at about 3' with bonsai maintenance...
Have fun,
Mike
susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://dotfile.net/- Dedicated to Open Source Software
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Y! Web Hosting - Let the expert host your web site

54) From: Michael Vanecek
Sure. Most fruiting plants still produce fruit when trained - if 
allowed. Figs and grapes do - why not coffee. However - remember - 
bonsai or not, your coffee isn't going to be the same as the parent. My 
kona trees will not produce kona coffee. The plant is only part of the 
equation - environment, location, soil, pruning techniques - all those 
play a huge role in varietal distinction. But, well, it's still neat and 
you may actually get a decent cup. For me, it's the neatness factor. I 
love coffee. I can now drink coffee and look at where it comes from. 
Same with chocolate. My trees may produce pods if I'm persistant - 
they're notoriously difficult to convince to pod out indoors since their 
natural polinator is a little midge - but it won't be the same as what 
you get from the tropics. Coffee grown indoors is supposed to be easy to 
convince to fruit - I think the flowers are self-polinating. I'll have 
to research that for sure. Giving it a good shake once and a while when 
it flowers - and/or having an oscillating fan on it set on low may help 
the self polination. Or not. Just a guess...
Tad Preston wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://dotfile.net/- Dedicated to Open Source Software
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

55) From: jerry
Susan, the sweet red juice isn't as sweet - or as much - as you might imagine.
The flesh surrounding the ripe bean is only attractive to hungry birds (don't
know about Indonesian mammals).  There's just very little there; although Bryce
Decker remembers going through the undergrowth in the Marquesas and stripping off
ripe beans from wild plants, popping them in his mouth, and sptting out the
"seeds" (beans).  He wrote "The interest in coffee goes back 35 years to the
Marquesas Islands
where I was doing field work for my dissertation and where arabica coffee grows
wild wherever there are shaded ravines, planted by birds, and by folks like me
passing through and chewing the sweet pulp off the cherries and spitting out the
seeds.  The Marquesans harvest the wild cherries and process the cherries
themselves by hand into extraordinarily aromatic coffee, usually drunk with
either coconut cream or sweetened condensed milk.  This. and its Tahitian cousin
is are coffees that do not reach world markets,  You just have to be there to
enjoy them."  --  Jerry Green
susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

56) From: Charlie Herlihy
--- jerry  wrote:
<Snip>
  Coffee juice is pretty sweet, and very thirst quinching. It's
true that there isn't a lot per cherry, though.Best to enjoy it
one cherry at a time, sucking on the seeds-then they're ready to
dry ! I've read about it being used for wine in Ethiopia for
centuries, and fresh pulp is still used to sweeten mezcal while
aging the liquor in Mexico.
 Preserving the genetics of very endangered strains like the
Maui Moka or St Helena "green tipped bourbon" varieties would be
a worthy cause for us. I'm bringing some seeds of those two
varieties with me to Oaxaca where, if they'll sprout, they'll be
well looked after. People have endured a lot to replant seeds
over so many thousands of years so we can enjoy the fruits of
agriculture, and if we ever stop doing that...
Charlie
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
HotJobs - Search new jobs daily nowhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

57) From: susan oppenheim
Great!! I have 10 seeds and 4 very good growing friends
I am going to be optimistic that I can also grow this stuff
and I am so looking forward to popping that first berry into my mouthand
tasting the sweet red juice!!!
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

58) From: susan oppenheim
3 or 4 years....oh my
well I can always go to a green mountain if I need to pick a berry
bonsai work as well here???
Michael Vanecek wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

59) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 13:13 11/2/02, susan oppenheim typed:
<Snip>
Just for the record, if you were not joking, the fruits will be the same 
size as regular coffee fruits.  Fruit size is unaffected by the bonsai 
process.  Only leaf size and wood structure are affected.
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

60) From: Michael Vanecek
Hee hee - I thought it Susan was joking. :)
I found this book helpful:http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0713717009/qid36257785/sr=1-8/ref=sr_1_8/104-4716325-3855149?v=glanceBe aware that coffee plants aren't very fast growing plants. Relatively 
speaking anyway. They take long to germinate, long to sprout and slow to 
grow. But they're simply beautiful plants to have around - and excellent 
conversation generators when you have friends over for some home roasted 
coffee. :)
Cheers,
Mike
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

61) From: susan oppenheim
teeny tiny little fruits
Tad Preston wrote:
<Snip>

62) From: susan oppenheim
I have had the berries many times in Costa Rica Nicaragua and Panama
they are a bit sweet but fuzzy like a quince
apparently it is washed off the seeds in many places and used as a fertilizer but I
do like it
but you were in the Marquesas??Isn't that one of the exotic locations for
survivor???Now I have to add this place to my wish list for travel
thanks for the cool e mail
Susan O
Toronto
jerry wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

63) From: susan oppenheim
I was feeling silly
yes they would be the same size
ta John
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

64) From: Clifton Burkett
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
 
The coffee seed I planted early this year is now about a six inch tall
plant. What wind speed should you bring a coffee plant indoors? Are =
seedling
plants in the six inch range left in direct sunlight or are they shade =
grown
under a net? I recently had to move the plant from the front porch due =
to it
is catching direct noon through afternoon sun which is a bit much for =
this
part of Florida. The porch has a southern exposure. Weather man sayz the
feeder bands from the tropical storm are starting to roll in so its time =
to
being the plant back in! Hope the cat leaves it alone!
 
Clif - SomeWhere in Florida with 
Odie the Corgi and Garfield the Tabby

65) From: Paul Goelz
At 07:02 AM 9/20/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
I have two five year old coffee plants that I grew from 
seedlings.  One is about three feet tall and the other is slightly 
smaller.  In their younger days they were very susceptible to drying 
out and they are VERY sensitive to frost.  Oh, and the cats love 
them.  But other than that, I never had a problem with too much 
sun.  Of course, they live in Michigan at 42 degrees north....
I would watch yours and if the wind can bend them maybe 45 degrees 
(?) get them inside.  Just a guess.  Once inside, make sure you look 
at them every day..... mine had a real thirst and were forever drying 
out and wilting (or worse).  But they never died and managed to 
always come back.
In past years, I have always managed to leave them out just a tad too 
long and they got frostbitten.  Kinda decimates them, but darned if 
they don't come back the next year.  This year, they lived out on the 
deck all summer and got fed and watered regularly and have 
exploded.  This year, I will also bring them in way before frost is 
an issue, so hopefully they will continue to do well.  In the winter 
they live in a west window on my stereo speakers and out of reach of 
the cats.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
paul at pgoelz dot comhttp://www.pgoelz.com

66) From: Jason Brooks
Paul,
   Thanks for the tips.  I also have a plant from this year.  It's lived
its entire life in a clay pot on top of a Computer Armoire under a sky
light.  It seems pretty happy there.  With your notes, I'll likely
place it on our north facing deck next summer.  Frost doesn't happen
for, most likely, a while in Southside, VA.  But I think I'll hold off
for next year.  My bugger is probably 3-4".
Jason
<Snip>

67) From: Jason Molinari
Mine are also about 4" tall, and i've kept them inside
at all times, in a window that gets a few hours of
sunlight in the afternoon, because i didn't know how
they woudl react to full on georgia afternoon
sun...maybe i'll put them out for the next few months
now that the sun is calming down.
Can coffee plants handle FULL sun?
jason
--- Jason Brooks  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

68) From: Jeffrey Bair
This sounds like a lot of fun - does anyone know where can I get my hands o=
n 
some coffee seeds or starter plants?
 Jeff
 On 9/20/05, Jason Molinari  wrote: 
<Snip>

69) From: Chris McAvoy
Here's a good link on getting started:http://www.coffeeresearch.org/agriculture/homegrowing.htmI think I'm going to try and grow a plant in my cubicle at work. 
Chris
On 9/20/05, Jeffrey Bair  wrote:
<Snip>
 
<Snip>

70) From: Clifton Burkett
I moved them on to the porch until the rain bands go by. Probably stop by
late tomorrow. I think I may have over watered them. The leaves were
starting to get brown on the edges. Hopefully it will come back. Thanks for
the inof.
Clif - SomeWhere in Florida with 
Odie the Corgi and  Garfield the Tabby

71) From: Clifton Burkett
I put mine in a 20" terra-cotta pot so I wouldn't have to replant. Bad =
part
is there isn't many places I can put it now!
Clif - SomeWhere in Florida with 
Odie the Corgi and  Garfield the Tabby

72) From: Clifton Burkett
Mine handled a couple of hours of full sun each day, but the last week =
or so
it was more like 4+ hours. We had record heat this summer too with most
number of 90+ degree days on record for central Florida. The heat has =
smoked
a lot of plants that claim to be able to take full Florida sun. I really
like where I had it on the front porch, but in late August, early =
September
there is just too much sun. I have moved it to the back porch. Hopefully =
the
cat leaves it alone!
Clif - SomeWhere in Florida with 
Odie the Corgi and  Garfield the Tabby

73) From: john kahla
If your leaves are starting to go brown around the edges you may be getting=
 
coffee "rust". Do a search on the web and you will find some solutions that=
 
keep it in check. If you leave it unchecked it will infect the entire plant=
 
if it is in fact the "rust"
 Apparently all coffee plants in the world are now infected.

74) From: Clifton Burkett
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks for the link!
 
Da Odie - SomeWhere in Florida with
Clif the Human and Garfield the Tabby

75) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Mine like clay pots when young (terrcotta I mean, not glazed. There's 
a great pot called a "Long Tom" that allows for deeper root 
development. I actually have moved some of my mature plants into 20 
gallon galvanized trashcans on roller bases - they work well if you 
provide lots of drainage. I am sure they will rot out eventually, but 
the galvanized is not an issue with soil.
Tom
BTW - I have a pictorial on coffee cultivation on our pagehttp://www.sweetmarias.com/growingcoffeeathome.html<Snip>
-- 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom

76) From: R.N.Kyle
<Snip>
hands on some coffee seeds or starter plants?
Here is a ebay link on coffee plants for sale.http://snipurl.com/htq8RK
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
>This sounds like a lot of fun - does anyone know where can =
I get 
my hands on some coffee seeds or starter plants?
 
Here is a ebay link on coffee plants =
for 
sale.http://snipurl.com/htq8= 
RK
------=_NextPart_000_01A8_01C5BDF4.28B1D4A0--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.344 / Virus Database: 267.11.3/107 - Release Date: 9/20/2005
--======
GMAIL-43305C8077D7=======--

77) From: Sandy Andina
Paul,
     It really is a small world!  I knew you back in the old  
Barbarossa days, when I was a member of the then nascent Dulcimer  
Society of Northern Illinois (then the North Shore Dulcimer Society).  
I was the smartass who used to play "Tequila" and other rock songs on  
mt. dulcimer (delighting in shocking the petrified traddies).  I  
remember your arrangement of the "Leave It To Beaver" theme on hammer  
dulcimer. I got lost to rock and roll for a few years before getting  
back into folk in late '99.  Here's another blast from the past: I am  
now part of an original acoustic duo called "Sass!" with--guess who-- 
Susan Urban!  We write in "classic folk" (as opposed to the currently  
popular Ani DiFranco-esque "alternative folk") style, with equal  
parts storytelling and humor (some of it gently crass). We've been  
played individually and collectively on NPR, "The Midnight Special,"  
and "Dr. Demento" (on whose latest compilation CD my "Because We Can"  
appears). My first CD, "Ghosts & Angels," came out in 2001; the first  
Andina & Rich (see below) CD, "Because We Can" is about to be  
released and is already getting some airplay.  We've played several  
festivals including D.A.F.T., Hiawatha, and Fox Valley (which I've  
played solo since 2001).
     To move this back on-topic, one of my (and now our) favorite  
songs is "Caffeine." We haven't recorded it yet, but Stephen Lee Rich  
(of Andina & Rich) up in Madison, WI has, on his first CD "Facing  
Monday."  My passion for coffee, especially quality microroasters and  
good espresso, has led me to seek out coffeehouses as my primary type  
of venue, as I know I will get a good cup at the gig and before I hit  
the road again the next morning (I'm sure you know what passes for  
coffee at most motels these days).  Just in case, though, I always  
travel with a few days worth of my most recent homeroasts, both  
regular and decaf--plus a hand grinder, electric kettle, and press  
pot.  I am going to be spending the next week down in Florida at my  
mom's place, which has a decent drip pot and burr grinder--but since  
the only source of espresso nearby is S'bux a mile away or Liberties  
10 mi. south in Boca, I'm bringing not only some home-roasted Red  
Line regular & decaf but a pour-over non-electric Cafe Presso machine  
(or maybe a backpacking stovetop moka pot, depending on how full my  
suitcase is).
     Do your coffee plants bear fruit? Do you dry and roast it? If  
so, what's the flavor profile?
On Sep 20, 2005, at 6:23 AM, Paul Goelz wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com

78) From: Paul Goelz
At 12:06 PM 9/20/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Perfect place for them.  That is where mine lived for the first year 
or two.  That way you can keep a close eye on them and keep them 
watered as needed.  They were in a north facing bay window, so they 
got indirect sun.
At home on the deck we have a bunch of trees so they get full 
Michigan sun for several hours a day and indirect sun for maybe five 
or six hours.  They really love it out there.  I think they also love 
the Miracle Grow they are being fed.  It is in a hose end sprayer 
thingie that we use on all our plants, so they get fed every 
watering.  They also get whatever rain that falls.
One important thing for outdoor plants exposed to rain is to make 
sure you do not have a tray or saucer under the pots that can cause 
water to pool in the bottom of the pot.  You want it to drain out.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

79) From: Paul Goelz
At 01:16 PM 9/20/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Like I said, they are very sensitive.  My usual problem was under 
watering.  But I think they are probably sensitive to over watering 
too.  And I thought I had killed mine several times, but I was quite 
surprised how well they came back.  My smaller one is smaller because 
it got frost bitten and then one of my dear cats decimated it 
further.  But this summer on the deck has done wonders for it and it 
has come back with a vengeance.  I wonder how happy they have to be 
to flower and develop cherries?  I think mine are approaching the right age.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

80) From: Paul Goelz
At 01:31 PM 9/20/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
I wonder if that is in fact what happens to mine after they are 
exposed to even mild frost.... the leaves turn brown in patches but 
rarely actually die altogether and fall off.  After the frost event, 
the brown appears but then does not seem to get much worse over time.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

81) From: Paul Goelz
At 03:03 PM 9/20/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Ah, that is why the name is familiar!  Truly a small world.  Say HI 
to Susan next time you see her too.  And how is the DSNI doing?  I'm 
still hammering over here in Michigan.  See my web site.....
<Snip>
No fruit yet.  I keep waiting.  But what with the cats and the frost, 
the plants haven't been the happiest they could be until this 
summer.  I expect I may see some fruit maybe next year given the fact 
they are probably pushing five years old at this point.  I'll have to 
do a lot of reading before I try to actually process any cherries 
though.  Oh, and does it require a male and female coffee plant?
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

82) From: Clifton Burkett
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
thanks, I'll check it out.
 
Da Odie - SomeWhere in Florida with
Clif the Human and Garfield the Tabby

83) From: Michael Wascher
Here's an interesting coffee plant from EBay: item
7713900975.
From the ad" This tropical relative of coffee is the primary admixture plan=
t
employed by Shamans of the Amazon basin to make the famous visionary drink
known as Ayahuasca."
So, Tom. Have you cupped this bean yet?
--MikeW
On 9/20/05, R.N.Kyle  wrote:
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
--
"Not all things that are countable, count, and not all things that count,
are countable". Albert Einstein

84) From: Clifton Burkett
Thanks for the tip. I have to go to Lowes tomorrow so I will check the
terra-cotta situation out. I had think they had a few deeper ones. I had =
to
go measure the plant to check it's size, it is just a tad over eight =
inches
tall. I'll have to take a few pics and put on my web site. I found a =
seed
company that also sells coffee seeds.http://seedrack.com/02.html I =
figured
I would take a shot and order a couple packs, they have a Arabica a Kona =
and
a dwarf. I'll let you know how they do and how the seeds are packaged.  =
I
did see on the site it said grow in medium light, or filtered or =
indirect
sunlight.  Is that what they mean by shade grown? Is there a canopy of
taller trees filtering out part of the main sun to the coffee trees?  =
Glad I
moved my plant out of the direct Florida sun! 
Clif - SomeWhere in Florida with 
Odie the Corgi and  Garfield the Tabby

85) From: tom ulmer
Different Tom I'm sure, but I cupped that one in my misspent youth after
being intrigued by the ramblings of Carlos Casteneda. It is similar in
effect to the Lophophora Williamsii used by North American Shamans. From a
culinary aspect it is quite horrid but very useful in toning the abdominal
muscles.

86) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
This wouldn't by any chance have anything to do with projectile 
vomiting, would it, Tom?
Gene Smith
who will remember the taste of the peyote cactus to his dying day

87) From: tom ulmer
I recall thinking that it was forceful disembodiment...

88) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
I recall thinking "So this is what frightened sea cucumbers feel 
like..."
Gene Smith
getting ready to possibly be turned inside-out again, in Houston

89) From: Steven Van Dyke
Hey Gene - why are you still in Houston?  Latest trackhttp://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at3%2Bshtml/144728.shtml?5day?largesays you should be joining the herd and going on safari.  My brother lives
in Angleton (a bit South & West) and they were going to head out yesterday
afternoon but turned back due to traffic to do it this early morning.  He's
flying their small plane, she's driving.  Even if she's stuck in traffic, at
least it will be cooler at 4AM then 4PM.
Enjoy!
Steve :->

90) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
My parents spent 4 hours on I-45 yesterday...making about 15 miles 
northing before giving up and going back to La Marque (about 15 
minutes - on a normal day - from Galveston).  They snuck up here to 
Houston in the middle of the night and are ensconced in a hotel on 
the West side of town, near us.
We're a-stayin'...unless driven out.  And I have to go roast some 
coffee before the storm.  Let's see...what would be a good 
Hurricane Blend?
Gene Smith
threading the wild learning curve (and hopefully, nothing else), in 
Houston

91) From: Paul Goelz
At 11:48 AM 9/22/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Monsooned Malabar?
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

92) From: Michael Vanecek
That's strictly frostbite. Coffee is 100% intolerant of frost and will 
incure damage every time. Mine suffered even when temps went down into 
the low 40's! I would try to keep it protected if you can.
Cheers,
Mike
--http://www.taroandti.com/http://www.mjv.com/
Paul Goelz wrote:
<Snip>

93) From: Michael Vanecek
They'll do well in an east facing exposure. Too much sun will burn them 
tho - I've watched my leaves get burned and had to move them. West is 
also not too bad - tho that's the hotter side. Mine are now outside 
enjoying a little sun when it's setting tho and they've grown great! 
They'll take residence in my new pit greenhouse as soon as I get the 
cover on. South facing may not be so good, north facing is great.
Have fun,
Mike
--http://www.taroandti.com/http://www.mjv.com/
Jason Molinari wrote:
<Snip>

94) From: Michael Vanecek
I've found that my young seedlings and even older plants are remarkably 
tolerant of wind here in Texas. Survived several thunderstorms with nary 
a problem. Likely due to a very flexible trunk that bends readily with 
the wind. I'm sure they'd likely be happier with less wind, and 
hurricanes may cause some problems, tho...
Cheers,
Mike
--http://www.taroandti.com/http://www.mjv.com/
Clifton Burkett wrote:
<Snip>

95) From: Paul Goelz
At 01:18 PM 9/22/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Don't worry.  This year they come in to stay the first time the 
forecast low is high 40s to low 50s.  Coming up soon.....
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

96) From: Jeremy DeFranco
OK Folks, I've gone completely crazy- I've went and ordered 2 coffea arabic=
a
plants from ebay to grow in my house! I will grow them outside in the
summer, and bring em in during the rest of the year. I got one Kona that is
only 2 inches yet, but I did get a dwarf (think it's caturra) arabica that
is supposed to be 1.5 feet, and will start putting out fruit as soon as
hopefully next summer. I'll probably prune these bad boys to be short and
stout. Apparrently there is a traditional way to prune the konas. I will be
looking into that, but I have much much time yet as this little baby is onl=
y
2 inches. I will probably have to wait 3 or 4 years for the kona to put out
fruit, but I figured the Kona would be traditional, since, after all, it is
an American type of Arabica. Also, Hawaii is low altitude, but with right
conditions Kona grows real nice. We'll see. I'm not looking for flavor when
it all boils down. I think I'm just insane about coffee, and am looking for
a buddy to chill out with. I'll have to see how much fruit these things
actually put out, though- It would be neat to dry process or dry pulp them,
or maybe wet process and fermentation! Next thing you know, I'll drop out o=
f
med school, and buy a farm in costa rica or guatamala! Very tempting.....
I'll be getting some grow lights at the end of the summer to put these
babies up for fall. If anyone has any knowlege or advice to share please le=
t
me know! I was actually thinking of keeping my plants in my basement during
the fall and winter under timed grow lights. Anyone know what type of
wattage I'll need?! I would like to keep both the initial and ongoing
electrical costs down to a minimum. Would the basement be enough light with
just the grow light?? If anyone's got any advice please shoot. But till nex=
t
time, Aloha! I like the sound of that.

97) From: Don Cummings
On 5/9/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>
hat
<Snip>
and
<Snip>
be
<Snip>
nly
<Snip>
ut
<Snip>
is
<Snip>
en
<Snip>
or
<Snip>
m,
<Snip>
 of
<Snip>
let
<Snip>
ng
<Snip>
th
<Snip>
ext
<Snip>
Ok, this is sick, dude.  Seek help. Especially the part about hanging out
with a buddy. How many times do you hang out with buddies while you roast
and consume their cousins.  Now, that said, how can I get in on this.  Not
just the plants, but also the farm in Costa Rica.  :)
Don

98) From: Zara Haimo
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<Snip>
these babies up for fall. 
The drug cops look for guys with large electric bills and grow lights in =
the basement, although they are expecting to find a different kind of =
plant when they burst through your front door.

99) From: raymanowen
Jeremy, I suspect the Gro-lights are just another marketing ploy to separat=
e
consumers from their finances.
Check out the following :
With an actinic output of 10,000K, this 15 watt fluorescent lamp will appea=
r
quite cold and hard blue, simulating North sky sunlight. Any 15-watt fixtur=
e
will light it OK.
Oh, blow me down! It's a $20 lamp! I'm sorry. I was looking for a spectrum
chart for the fluorescents. All fluorescents, especially Cool white and
Daylight lamps put out some UV with the visible light, IIRC.
Some fish tank fluorescents have a specific UV radiating aperture in the
glass envelope. Some fish really light up in the dark. The bulbs and the
fish probably cost like crazy. What else is new?
Find a horticulturalist and tell him what you're up to. If they have
knowledge, they'll share it. I believe you might seek your county's
"Agriculture Extension Service." Let your fingers do the walking.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

100) From: Aaron
Zara, that reminds me of what happened to me once.
Long story short,  I have a greenhouse I built out of an old iguana cage 
that I grow my vanilla plants in.  It has lights, a heater on a timer, 
they love it in there... anyways... stupid bitch who comes in once a 
month to spray the insecticide sees it, and calls the cops, says I am 
growing marijuana.  Needless to say from what I heard from the other 
folks who run the apartment complex here, they stake out my place for a 
few weeks to see who I am 'selling' to., eventually end up paying me a 
visit.. conviniently when I was not home of course, rummage all through 
the place and come out embarrassed as hell... yep, it's vanilla plants 
in there.  I went down to the police station and asked 'who' were the 
cops who went through my place... about 5 minutes later, two of JSO's 
finest showup, I tell them, you want to know what I was growing... it 
was vanilla,  vanilla plants make vanilla beans.... vanilla beans are 
used for home made vanilla ice cream, and I dropped off a big tub of my 
homemade vanilla ice cream for them.  They loved the ice cream, were 
really embarrassed over the whole thing, I laughed at it, I mean you 
KNOW they were probably all hyped about getting a 'drugbust' and end up 
seeing vanilla plants instead.  Needless to say, the IFC who was doing 
the bug spray is no longer working here.
On that though, yes Marijuana needs the high intensity sodium lamps,  
run about 1000 watts, and yes suck up tons of electricity.  The police 
really don't just look for a 'big jump' in the electric bill... yes they 
can use that as evidence possibly but they can't just look because it 
happened, and use that as the only reason to initiate their 
investigation bla bla.......  weed needs heat and high intensity, coffee 
and vanilla don't
,  I have two flourescent light fixtures in the greenhouse, they cost 
about 10 bucks each at Home Depot, and I have grow lights in them, the 
40 watt tubes, which cost about 6 bucks each, x 4 for about 50 bucks for 
the entire thing.   I have my coffee plants in with the vanilla plants 
and they are doing very well in there too.
the heater is set to about 85 degrees, they get 10hours of that with the 
lights on, then at night, the A/C blows on top of the thing, and while 
they don't get a direct blast of the air, it does cool it down to the 
lower 70's upper 60's at night... ideal for vanilla and well, obviously 
coffee plants too.  The heater is really not necessary and many times 
barely runs anyways... but the electric draw from this is a whole 
whopping 6 to 8 dollars a month for the plants.   Actually this is not 
too bad when I look at the lizards I have who suck down about 30 a month 
in heat lamps, sun lamps, uv lamps undergravel heaters bla bla...
*I had coffee outside and it did very well until a light frost hit it 
one night, killed it immediately ... now it stays inside.
aaron

101) From: Les
Doesn't everyone have at least one coffee plant in their abode?  I
have a very nice one that I grew from seeds sent to me from Mariachis
Island off the coast of Africa.
Les
On 5/8/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

102) From: llurgy
Have you got any pictures of your set-up?
I would like to try and grow some tropical plants (coffee, Orchids etc), I
was thinking of doing it in the basement, but I would like something
enclosed and what you have sounds like it could be it.
On 5/9/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

103) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jeremy,
You not nutz!
I'm in Parker CO which is about 6000 feet altitude (Mountain Grown eh?). =
I have three sets of unknown aribica type I bought from a school supply =
store and two I grew from seed. I got the seeds from Tom @ Sweet Marias =
in Sept of 2004, they took almost six months to sprout! Currently they =
are almost six inches tall and have several secondary leaves. The others =
are almost a foot tall. 
The store bought type are on the main level of the house in a southern =
exposure sun room, getting some sun and heat year round. The seedlings =
are upstairs in my "office" and get also get sun and heat. I plan to =
move all of them up here this fall when it gets cooler/cold to take =
advantage of the warmer room. They would go outside, but the bunnies =
that inhabit our neighborhood don't need any buzz snacks.
I try to keep them moist and well fertilized, I use orchid food as I can =
dilute it down to include their normal waterings
in house growing resources : =http://www.coffeeproject.com/more/trees.html# =http://www.sweetmarias.com/growingcoffeeathome.htmlwhich is Toms =">http://www.coffeeresearch.org/coffee/homegrowing.htm=http://www.coffeeproject.com/more/trees.html# =http://www.sweetmarias.com/growingcoffeeathome.htmlwhich is Toms =
pictoral essay on growing beans at home 
Additional place to buy seedlings: =http://wardsci.com/product.asp?pn=IG0011026Bob

104) From: Aaron
You know, I never could get any of my coffee seeds to ever grow.  I just 
ended up paying a few dollars and getting the live plants off a guy on E 
bay.  Must say though they are doing great fortunately.  It will 
probably be 50 years before they bloom if ever but I just like the way 
they look.
Aaron

105) From: Aaron
llurgy.  Let me take a few pictures and ill post them on the net for you 
to look at.
One thing I did, vanilla is a vine, and man it can grow like a weed.  It 
needs to be like 25 to 30 foot long before it will start blooming.  So I 
took 3 bamboo poles and put them in the green house lengthwise in a 
triangle shape so as the plant grows I can just wrap it round and round 
on the pole to keep it going.
Ill try to get the pics up later tonight for you
aaron

106) From: llurgy
Thanks, looking forward to seeing them.  That's a great idea with the bambo=
o
canes and the vanilla.  I want to try and make it look attractive which is
why I will be having the Orchids plus whatever takes my fancy.
I did grow a coffee plant from seed years ago, it was about 18 months old
when I accidently murdered it.
I was still living at home and my mum had made up a solution of white
vinegar and something else and put it in the empty fertilizer bottle.
Talk about reverse osmosis at work, that plant shriveled up in 30 minutes
flat!
I would buy the coffee plants, it just isnt worth all the pain of trying to
grow them from bean :)
On 5/9/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

107) From: Jon Rosen
--Apple-Mail-1--747131282
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I live in South Florida, so I can grow coffee trees outside. That's a  
good thing since there are no basements in South Florida. I bought an  
arabica about 2 years ago. Just when it was about to have beans, my  
gardener damaged the trunk with a weed whacker and almost killed it.  
Then Hurricane Wilma came along and tried to finish the job. It seems  
to be coming back now and I'm hoping to have a small harvest before  
the end of summer. It gets plenty of sun, obviously, but I don't know  
if it's too hot for it to really flourish in this climate. It's about  
3-4 feet high now. If I do get beans, I'll plant another tree or two  
and call it a plantation.
Jon
On May 9, 2006, at 2:57 PM, llurgy wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-1--747131282
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I live in South Florida, so I =
can grow coffee trees outside. That's a good thing since there are no =
basements in South Florida. I bought an arabica about 2 years ago. Just =
when it was about to have beans, my gardener damaged the trunk with a =
weed whacker and almost killed it. Then Hurricane Wilma came along and =
tried to finish the job. It seems to be coming back now and I'm hoping =
to have a small harvest before the end of summer. It gets plenty of sun, =
obviously, but I don't know if it's too hot for it to really flourish in =
this climate. It's about 3-4 feet high now. If I do get beans, I'll =
plant another tree or two and call it a plantation.
Jon On= May 9, 2006, at 2:57 PM, llurgy wrote:
Thanks, = looking forward to seeing them. That's a great idea with the bamboo = canes and the vanilla. I want to try and make it look attractive = which is why I will be having the Orchids plus whatever takes my = fancy. I did grow a coffee plant from seed years ago, it was = about 18 months old when I accidently murdered it. I was still = living at home and my mum had made up a solution of white vinegar and = something else and put it in the empty fertilizer bottle. Talk about = reverse osmosis at work, that plant shriveled up in 30 minutes flat! = I would buy the coffee plants, it just isnt worth all the pain of trying = to grow them from bean :) On = 5/9/06, Aaron < beerbong> = wrote:llurgy.Let me take a few pictures and ill post them on the = net for you to look at. One thing I did, vanilla is a vine, = and man it can grow like a weed.It needs to be like 25 to 30 = foot long before it will start blooming.So I took 3 bamboo = poles and put them in the green house lengthwise in a triangle shape = so as the plant grows I can just wrap it round and round on the pole = to keep it going. Ill try to get the pics up later tonight for = you aaron = homeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = --Apple-Mail-1--747131282--

108) From: Jeremy DeFranco
-Jeremy, I suspect the Gro-lights are just another marketing ploy to
separate
consumers from their finances.
Check out the following :
----I agree. The link did not work, though.... I did find this LED. LED
looks promising, because electric bill is only $20 more a year.http://www.cleanairgardening.com/growlight.htmlThis is very pricey,
though.....
-I have two flourescent light fixtures in the greenhouse, they cost
about 10 bucks each at Home Depot, and I have grow lights in them, the
40 watt tubes, which cost about 6 bucks each, x 4 for about 50 bucks for
the entire thing.   I have my coffee plants in with the vanilla plants
and they are doing very well in there too.
----Thanks. Any idea how much this is costing per month?
     Jeremy

109) From: michael holland
I have two coffee plants - still not tall or sturdy enough to be called
bushes or trees yet. They have been in the ground for a year now. Under the
canopy of a carob tree getting light fertilizer on rare occasions and
watered by drip irrigation. Survived a freeze last January and our infamous
dry season this year.
Found them through Ebay from a nurseyman in the Southeast U.S.
Coming back from Europe this summer, my wife filled out the Customs form and
forgot that the winemaking yeasts I purchased in Belgium should probably
have been listed under "live cell cultures".
-- 
Michael Holland
Los Angeles City Archives
President, Cellarmasters

110) From: Cameron Forde
I picked up a pot of coffee plants from Ikea (something like $5 for a
pot with 5 stems) three years ago and amazingly they are still alive.
They've grown from about 8" to about 15" (I have them indoors
year-round and don't expect to ever harvest anything worth roasting
from these plants).  The label indicated that they are Arabica FWIW.
Cameron
On Dec 6, 2007 3:13 PM, michael holland  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
ceforde

111) From: gin
I dropped a handful of beans in a huge planter by mistake, we will see what happens...
did you per chance go to the Horta House while in Belgium?
f
---- michael holland  wrote: 
<Snip>

112) From: Sheila Quinn
By mistake, huh? Gee, how does one *accidentally* drop a handful of 
beans in a planter? ;)
Sheila
gin wrote:
<Snip>

113) From: Phil Bergman Jungle Music
At our nursery, we've been growing coffee trees for years.  It's not our =
main product, but sort of fun and can be grown as houseplants.  I had =
one for about 15 years in my front yard that gave coffee beans all the =
time.  It was about 12 to 15 feet tall with lots of braches.  It =
repetitively had beautiful red fruited seeds.  I never made coffee from =
them back then as I wasn't roasting at the time.  Surprisingly, these =
trees do better with filtered light in So Cal.  They don't like our full =
sun here.  Also, the blossoms are plentiful and an attractive white =
color.  Each "fruit" has two seeds in it.  When you clean the seeds, you =
get the two "halves", each of which is a coffee bean that you recognize. =
Phil
www.junglemusic.net

114) From: Bryan Wray
Anybody know where I could get them around Michigan (or an online vendor)?  Contact me off-list please.
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Looking for last minute shopping deals?  Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

115) From: Brett Mason
Try the tropical highland areas of Michigan....
Sorry, couldn't resist.
Brett
On 12/7/07, Bryan Wray  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

116) From: Bryan Wray
Yeah... it's super tropical here right now... like 20 or so...  I did look on ebay really quickly, but I don't know what I should be looking for.  Also, would shipping the plant into cold weather up here be a problem, if I grabbed a plant off of ebay?
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile.  Try it now.

117) From: Brett Mason
Bryan, I think your best bet is to buy a plant i the spring time and have it
transfered to you.  I would bet a nursery in your area would arrange it
through their normal channels...
Then your only challenge is how to keep it through the winter...
I haven't gone there either - It's 30% warmer here - 26 right now.  Tonight
is supposed to get down to 3, with -5 due to wind chill...  Think I will let
the kids sleep inside tonight...
Brett
On 12/7/07, Bryan Wray  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

118) From: Bryan Wray
Where are located Brett? 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Never miss a thing.   Make Yahoo your homepage.

119) From: Brett Mason
Cedar Rapids, IA - about 8 hrs WSW of you...  We drove by you coming home
from Susan Oppenheim's this past June - wish we had known, we would have
stopped by!
Where exactly in MI ar you guys?
B
On 12/7/07, Bryan Wray  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

120) From: Bryan Wray
I live in Paw Paw... but since you have never heard of it, Paw Paw is about 25 miles west of Kalamazoo, which you may have heard of.
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Never miss a thing.   Make Yahoo your homepage.

121) From: gin
well, they don't call me grace without reason!! doing three things at one time, goling through the door while scooping out beans to roast and running into my 110 pound shadow, aka the mouse really Buddy the dog!
g
---- Sheila Quinn  wrote: 
<Snip>

122) From: gin
jeez Brett, we have tropical HIGHlands right here in AZ...
ginny
could not resist!!
---- Brett Mason  wrote: 
<Snip>

123) From: Rich
I would hate to have to try and pack a live plant for UPS shipping.... 
Try the local nurseries as they should have the plants.  Put it in a 
large pot and it will grow to fill the pot.
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>

124) From: Brett Mason
Please grab a cup of coffee...  COFFEE...  OK, so now this might seem
less-OT with the thread...
...Speaking of nurseries, my cousin owns a business that you need to take a
peek at, because of their patented shipping methods for their plants....
go to   www.mycarnivore.com   - it's all about carnivorous plants...  You
just might find a holiday gift there for somebody!
I am thankful there are not coffee eating plants!
Brett
On 12/7/07, Rich  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

125) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

126) From: Joe Screnock
A couple years ago I received a coffee plant from a client.  Someone 
gave it to her as a gift and gave it to me one day when she was cleaning 
her office.  I would need to find and check the label, but I believe all 
it said was "Coffee Plant - I'm Caffeinated" (or some such).
It was about that time that someone recommended potting in a clay pot, 
which I did.  I've transplanted it twice, and now need to get it a much 
larger pot.  It's on my ToDo list.
I wish I could know what type it is.  I don't know if I will ever get 
any beans from it, but it's fun to water every 3 days.  :-)
Joe
-- 
No virus was sent with this message - jjs.
Checked by AVG Free Edition. 
Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.16.13/1165 - Release Date: 12/2/2007 8:34 PM

127) From: Sue
Bryan,
Walmart in Traverse City has them on occassion! I've picked them up three
different times there in the last two years. I think I paid 1.66 for a small
pot (4 inch?) with 5 or 6 stems in it.
Sue
On 12/7/07, Bryan Wray  wrote:
<Snip>

128) From: raymanowen
I love your math. 26 F is 30% warmer than 20 F. I guess there is no h=
eat
at 0 F?
The absolute number 26 is 30% greater than the number 20.
It's only true if you're reading the Kelvin scale. Add 460 to F X 0.556(=
apx).
The thermodynamic value of 26 F = 270K ; 20 F = 259K. The actual =
ratio is
270/ 259 = 1.04, or
*4% warmer*. Mebbe.
There's not much energy difference when the absolute temperature difference
is so small.
Since the human experience is mainly between the limits of H2O Freezing and
boiling, the Centigrade scale might be more applicable, but gives the ratio
of (-) 3.333C/ (-)6.667C, or *50% COOLER!*
Don't you just love math?
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Figures don't Lie...
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On Dec 7, 2007 7:34 AM, Brett Mason < homeroast> wrote:
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
 I
<Snip>
for.
<Snip>
if I
<Snip>
lt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ+>
<Snip>

129) From: Bryan Wray
No, I'm not real fond of math at all and almost needed a cup of coffee just to get through and understand your post. :0)   I liked Brett's better, it was wrong, but it was SO much easier! haha
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Looking for last minute shopping deals?  Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

130) From: Brett Mason
I'm with Ray, and my new friend, Kelvin!  He says I am right!
One other observation from Ray - there is no absolute wrong on my
calculation either - therefore it is correct...
For the rest of us, the math worked - why?  Cause everything starts at 0,
and 30% of 20 is 6....
I'm gunna go ask my Uncle Forrest!
Brett
On Dec 7, 2007 6:15 PM, Bryan Wray  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

131) From: Allon Stern
--Apple-Mail-22--276174224
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
On Dec 7, 2007, at 7:15 PM, Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
That's okay, I think Ray's is off too.
On Dec 7, 2007, at 7:08 PM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
actual  
<Snip>
How can this be a valid way to measure temperature rise?
Because it's based on absolute zero? If that was all it took, then it  =
should be the same value if you use Rankine:
26F = 485.67 R, 20F = 479.67 R. 485.67/479.67 =1.0125.
Still not sure how to compute percentage rise in temperature, or what  =
that even means. But I'm pretty sure 4% is wrong ;)
But hey, the logic SOUNDED good...
ref:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rankine_scale-
allon=
--Apple-Mail-22--276174224
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
On Dec 7, 2007, at 7:15 PM, Bryan Wray wrote:
No, I'm = not real fond of math at all and almost needed a cup of coffee just to = get through and understand your post. :0) I liked Brett's better, it = was wrong, but it was SO much easier! = haha That's okay, I think Ray's is off = too.
On Dec = 7, 2007, at 7:08 PM, raymanowen = wrote:The thermodynamic value of = 26 F = 270K ; 20 F = 259K. The actual ratio is 270/ 259 = = 1.04, or 4% warmer. = Mebbe. How can this be a valid way to = measure temperature rise?Because it's based on absolute zero? = If that was all it took, then it should be the same value if you use = Rankine:26F = 485.67 R, 20F = 479.67 R. = 485.67/479.67 =1.0125.
Still not sure how to = compute percentage rise in temperature, or what that even means. But I'm = pretty sure 4% is wrong ;)But hey, the logic SOUNDED = good...
ref:http://en.wikipedia.or=g/wiki/Rankine_scale-allon= --Apple-Mail-22--276174224--

132) From: Paul Goelz
At 09:07 AM 12/7/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Are there any Frank's Nursery and Crafts left?  The one that used to 
be here in Rochester was where I bought mine as babies about 6 years 
ago.  I haven't seen any at Bordine's.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
paul at pgoelz dot comhttp://www.pgoelz.com

133) From: Paul Goelz
At 09:34 AM 12/7/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Howzabout seeds?http://seedrack.com/02.html (scroll down to COFFEE)
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
paul at pgoelz dot comhttp://www.pgoelz.com

134) From: raymanowen
OK. Confusion reigns supreme between both of my living brain cells.
Both Lord Kelvin's scale and the Rankine scale are absolute, start at Zero,
or no thermal energy.
If you have a balanced teeter-totter, with a pile of bricks on one end and
an Edsel engine block on the other, the products of the mass or weights and
length of arm from the fulcrum are equal. You could measure the products in
kg-mtrs, stone-cubits or pounds-feet. The ratio is still 1 at balance.
Rankine just uses Fahrenheit degrees (180 from freezing to boiling), while
Kelvin uses Celsius degrees- 100 Celsius degrees in the same interval.
It is beyond the scope, interest and necessity of this list to pursue the
topic further. Besides, I wouldn't understand it.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On Dec 7, 2007 6:08 PM, Paul Goelz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

135) From: Brian Kamnetz
On Dec 7, 2007 9:08 PM,   wrote:
<Snip>
I'm way ahead of you, Ray....
Brian

136) From: Lynne
Bryan, I need a cup of coffee AND a good shot of brandy just to read these
posts - and forget about understanding them!
Lynne
(math drives my BP to skyrocket levels...)
Bryan said:
No, I'm not real fond of math at all and almost needed a cup of coffee just
<Snip>

137) From: Bryan Wray
The sad thing is I was actually pretty good at math in high school... it's just that then I *had* to be good at math, now no one is grading me, and it makes me happy... :0)
   
  -Bry
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Never miss a thing.   Make Yahoo your homepage.

138) From: Tim Harvey
definately heard of paw paw, even been there many times.  I work off centre ave just off 131.
Do you work at/own  NaDean's?  I'd love to stop by and say hi.
Tim
---- Bryan Wray  wrote: 
<Snip>

139) From: Tim TenClay
Woah... how did I miss that... Paw Paw?!  I live near Allegan.  Crazy!
 I guess I'll have to drop down to NaDean's....
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
On Dec 9, 2007 4:51 PM, Tim Harvey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
The content of this e-mail may be private or of confidential nature.
Do not forward without permission of the original author.
--
Rev. Tim TenClay, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Blog:http://lexorandi.tenclay.org

140) From: Jon Rosen
I have a coffee tree that I've been growing for about a year in my  
Florida backyard. It's about 4 feet high, but has not sprouted any  
flowers or berries. I put it in a partly shady location, but I'm not  
sure it's entirely happy there. Time will tell.
Jon
On Dec 6, 2007, at 6:13 PM, michael holland wrote:
<Snip>

141) From: Tim TenClay
Wow... mine is three years old and about 5 inches tall :-(
I'm beginning to wonder if it's coffee bonzai...
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
On Dec 10, 2007 10:02 AM, Jon Rosen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
The content of this e-mail may be private or of confidential nature.
Do not forward without permission of the original author.
--
Rev. Tim TenClay, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Blog:http://lexorandi.tenclay.org

142) From: Joseph Robertson
I was told by another coffee bush gardener that if you want to force or
encourage flowering to fertilize with potassium.
I have not personally read up on this yet. Mine are still 6 to 10 inches
tall.
JoeR
On Dec 10, 2007 7:02 AM, Jon Rosen  wrote:
<Snip>

143) From: Bryan Wray
It's crazy to me how many people are in Michigan... there are quite a few of us aren't there?
-bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Looking for last minute shopping deals?  Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

144) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I am in Howell and Howellite (Paul) is about 2 miles up the road from =
me.
Mike Chester

145) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Stressing the plant by withholding water until the leaves droop a bit 
will help trigger flowering too... but you need to do it at the right 
time of year too. I have some flowering now, but I think this is "2nd 
harvest." I let my cherry dry on the tree this year, harvested it all 
2 weeks ago, and am sundrying it all now! Should result in, oh, say 8 
cups of coffee!
Tom
I was told by another coffee bush gardener that if you want to force 
or encourage flowering to fertilize with potassium.
I have not personally read up on this yet. Mine are still 6 to 10 inches tall.
JoeR
On Dec 10, 2007 7:02 AM, Jon Rosen <jon> wrote:
I have a coffee tree that I've been growing for about a year in my
Florida backyard. It's about 4 feet high, but has not sprouted any
flowers or berries. I put it in a partly shady location, but I'm not
sure it's entirely happy there. Time will tell.
Jon
On Dec 6, 2007, at 6:13 PM, michael holland wrote:
<Snip>

146) From: James Leach
I'm in Grand Haven.
On Dec 10, 2007 2:41 PM, Mike Chester  wrote:
<Snip>

147) From: Paul Goelz
At 01:48 PM 12/10/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Please explain further for a plant dunce like me (if it used 
electrons I'd be fine).
My two plants are about 5-6 years old.  One is maybe 24-30 inches 
tall and the other is about 36-40 inches.  The smaller one almost 
died from frostbite several years back but made a remarkable 
comeback.  They both have flowered the last two springs, but the 
first year was only 1-2 flowers per plant.  This last spring there 
were more but still not a lot.  No cherries.... I don't think they 
are getting any sex.....
I inadvertently stress them once in a while by forgetting to 
water.  When I water, I use plant food.  In the summer, they live 
outdoors in full sun for maybe 3 hours and shade for the rest.
Define pruning.... do I simply cut off the growth tips on the 
vertical stems?  I have been letting them do what they want since 
they are houseplants......
Oh, and both plants have 3-5 stems.  Because they are close together, 
they tend to bow outward a bit and I had to amputate one that bent 
all the way over.
They used to go camping with us in the summer so they would get 
watered.  They are part of the family ;)
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
paul at pgoelz dot comhttp://www.pgoelz.com

148) From: Paul Goelz
At 07:09 PM 12/11/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Yes, muchly!  Thanks!
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
paul at pgoelz dot comhttp://www.pgoelz.com

149) From: Paul
In case anyone is interested, I just received a coffee arabica plant from Territorial Seed and they still have them available< 20% off. It's in great shape, and you don't have to bother trying to grow one from seed. I can get it potted now and outside for a good growing season this year. Here's the web site if anybody on the list wants to get one. I don't think you'll be disappointed:http://www.territorialseed.com/product/1329/s Mine is the size pictured. I even got a coffee cup and saucer planter today at Wal Mart to put it in!
Regards,
PAUL CARDER
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20


HomeRoast Digest