HomeRoast Digest


Topic: My first try-Advice? (8 msgs / 397 lines)
1) From: Randy & Debbie B.
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Well, I managed to get some green beans locally, and did my first batch in a
wok.
Since they didn't have a large choice of coffees, my pick was Columbian
Supremo Beans, since we have in the past enjoyed Roasted Columbian coffee
beans that we bought at the local Costco.
As I did them up in the Wok, I compared the color to the roasted ones, and
got as close to that as possible, to make sure I did not over roast. That
was my biggest fear, since we do not like really dark roasted coffees.
Well, I was a bit disappointed in first the Aroma, and then the taste.
After reaching the first crack stage, I was expecting that wonderful coffee
smell that comes out of the bag when you first open it, but I didn't get it.
When I ground the beans the next morning to make the coffee, although it was
nice and smooth, it still lacked that distinct coffee flavor, and seemed a
bit weak.
Is it the type of beans I chose?
Or, did I not roast these long enough?
Should I blend in some beans of another coffee, to get that aroma and
flavor?  If so, which one?
I wanted to see how I would fare at my first attempt, before purchasing too
many types, so I have yet to try some of the suggestions I got initially
from some of you.
But, maybe someone can add a few comments about  this first attempt I made.
Debbie

2) From: James Gundlach
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Debbie,
    See my suggestions interspersed below.
On Sunday, June 9, 2002, at 12:52 PM, Randy & Debbie B. wrote:
<Snip>
batch 
<Snip>
The quality of green beans varies greatly.  Even well roasted poor beans =
do  not make good coffee.
<Snip>
Columbian 
<Snip>
<Snip>
Columbian Supremo is a mass produced crop and most of them are poor 
quality.
<Snip>
<Snip>
One of the nice things about roasting in the wok is that you can take 
beans out at different degrees of roast.  I often try a first roast of a =
new coffee in a wok just so I can take some out after the first crack, =
just as the second crack is starting, and well into the second crack 
just to see how the beans work.
<Snip>
taste.  
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
The aroma you get during roasting is nothing like that you get from the =
bag.  When you roast you smell the elements given off during the 
roasting process.  When you smell the newly opened bag you get the 
elements given off as the coffee went stale.
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
You did not say how you prepared the coffee, if it was any way besides =
espresso, you need to let it rest a couple more days.  Often coffees 
taste flat before they rest about three days.  A extra fine grind and 
the pressure of a good espresso machine does not seem to need resting as =
much.
<Snip>
     Probability of yes is about .8.
<Snip>
     More likely not rested long enough unless you did not let it get =
all 
the way through the first crack.
<Snip>
and 
<Snip>
    I hate to sound like a broken record but try Tom's sample pack.  You =
can pick the one you like the most and select some others with a similar =
profile to find coffees you really like.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama.
--Apple-Mail-1-250636245
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Debbie,
   See my suggestions interspersed below.
On Sunday, June 9, 2002, at 12:52 PM, Randy & Debbie B. wrote:
ArialWell, I managed to
get some green beans locally, and did my first batch in a wok.
=
Arial=
The quality of green beans varies greatly.  Even well roasted poor
beans do  not make good coffee.  
 
ArialSince they didn't have a
large choice of coffees, my pick was Columbian Supremo Beans, since we
have in the past enjoyed Roasted Columbian coffee beans that we bought
at the local Costco. 
=
Arial=
Columbian Supremo is a mass produced crop and most of them are poor
quality.
 
ArialAs I did them up in the Wok,
I compared the color to the roasted ones, and got as close to that as
possible, to make sure I did not over roast. That was my biggest fear,
since we do not like really dark roasted coffees.
=
Arial=
One of the nice things about roasting in the wok is that you can take
beans out at different degrees of roast.  I often try a first roast of
a new coffee in a wok just so I can take some out after the first
crack, just as the second crack is starting, and well into the second
crack just to see how the beans work.
 
ArialWell, I was a bit
disappointed in first the Aroma, and then the taste.  After reaching
the first crack stage, I was expecting that wonderful coffee smell
that comes out of the bag when you first open it, but I didn't get it.
=
Arial=
The
aroma you get during roasting is nothing like that you get from the
bag.  When you roast you smell the elements given off during the
roasting process.  When you smell the newly opened bag you get the
elements given off as the coffee went stale.
When I ground the beans the next morning to make the coffee,
although it was nice and smooth, it still lacked that distinct coffee
flavor, and seemed a bit weak.
You did not say how you prepared the coffee, if it was any way besides
espresso, you need to let it rest a couple more days.  Often coffees
taste flat before they rest about three days.  A extra fine grind and
the pressure of a good espresso machine does not seem to need resting
as much.
 
ArialIs it the type of beans I
chose?
=
Arial=
   
Probability of yes is about .8.
Or, did I not roast these long enough?
    More likely not rested long enough unless you did not
let it get all the way through the first crack.
Should I blend in some beans of another coffee, to get that
aroma and flavor?  If so, which one?
   I hate to sound like a broken record but try Tom's sample pack. 
You can pick the one you like the most and select some others with a
similar profile to find coffees you really like.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama.
--Apple-Mail-1-250636245--
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: The Scarlet Wombat
Hi Debbie,
The aroma of beans roasting is not the same as they will emit after resting 
for awhile.  In fact, many people who love the smell of coffee dislike the 
smell of beans roasting.
After beans roast, they must outgas, this means they have to get rid of any 
number of chemicals formed in the heat of the roasting process.  This takes 
from 24 to 48 hours.
I generally let most of my roasts rest for 36 hours before using.  If you 
seal them in a jar after an hour or two, and open it a few times in the 
next 36 hours to allow the expelled gases to vent off, you will notice the 
aroma grow stronger and stronger.  Freshly roasted beans do not have much, 
but if you take a warm one and bite it in half, you will taste the good 
flavor you expect.
As you do more roasting, you will notice that the aroma changes during the 
roasting process, and these changes canb e used as a very accurate 
indicator of the stage of roast o the beans.
Dan
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4) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
Wok method is not that easy and takes some practice.
Generic "Columbian supremo" can be excellent or crap because supremo
just means big seed size. However, if you are comparing your roast to
the roasted coffee you buy from the same source, you can still get
good idea of how your roast compares.
<Snip>
The aroma during roasting is quite a bit different from what you get
from packaged coffee. The roast smell is more pungent and smoky.
<Snip>
There are many possibilities. You might be roasting too quickly or too
slowly. You might have not waited enough after roasting to develop
flavor. Keep notes, and also provide more details when you ask questions.
<Snip>
If you suspect this, pick one of the popular coffee from Sweet Maria's
so that many people can comment on your result.
<Snip>
Possibly.
<Snip>
Blending to enhance cup quality takes some skill. Not that you can't
do it, but if you are starting out homeroasting, you should perfect
roasting method and familiarize yourself with several beans before you
start playing with blending.
Also, wok roasting is not the best method to produce great aroma. For
that, hot air popcorn popper is better suited. If you have a gas oven,
you can use it, although it requires some practice also. (However, I
*think* oven is much easier to perfect than wok, which I am nowhere
near perfection.) Gas oven method is somehow not too popular, and I
think is VERY underrated as a method of homeroasting coffee.
When you start, I suggest to get a couple of VERY different beans in
some quantity (maybe 2lbs) and try various roasting profiles to learn
how the coffee come out differently. It can be Columbia, Sumatra
Mandheling, Kenya, Ethiopian Harar.
If you are a "try once and give up if it fails" type of person, please
ignore all I said above. It takes some tenacity.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"Don't play what's there, play what's not there." (Miles Davis)
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5) From: Steven Dover

6) From: Randy & Debbie B.
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I read all  of your answers with great interest.  You can sure tell I don't
know one bean from another!  So that's why you don't see "Columbian Supremo"
on the Sweet Maria's site. :)
Just to clarify a bit, I just used the coffee in my regular drip coffee
maker. We are not Espresso Drinkers, but I did notice, now that you guys
mention it, that it seemed to improve after sitting a day or so longer.
I also agree with the comments about the aroma. I could sit with my nose in
a bag of beans bought from a store for hours, but was not impressed with the
smell of them roasting.  (Sure hope the neighbours don't think I'm smoking
something illegal, heh heh)
For a novice, I think I didn't do too bad a job using the wok, even though
the temperature on mine only goes up to around 400 degrees. If I get the
hang of this, I would like to invest in a small roaster eventually, so will
be watching comments on the type you all recommend for beginners.  In the
meantime, though, I do want to try one of the Sample packs, so will probably
order one and do my comparisons to the beans I have here.
It's great to have so much good advice.  Thanks
Debbie

7) From: jim gundlach
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On Tuesday, June 11, 2002, at 06:54 AM, Randy & Debbie B. wrote:
<Snip>
You need to get over 400 degrees to get the coffee roasted.  If you are 
roasting with an electric wok, it may not get hot enough but just 
because the dial only goes to 400 that does not mean it doesn't get 
hotter.  If you can produce a second crack I believe you are getting 
over 400. I don't use a thermometer but I usually make my first roasting 
of a  new coffee in a wok over a wood or gas fire to learn the bean.  I 
think the wok gives more of your senses access to the roasting process 
and I like to know what to expect from a bean when I use a method that 
reduces my ability to see, smell or hear the roasting beans.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama.
--Apple-Mail-1-400081994
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On Tuesday, June 11, 2002, at 06:54 AM, Randy & Debbie B. wrote:
ArialFor a novice, I
think I didn't do too bad a job using the wok, even though the
temperature on mine only goes up to around 400 degrees.
Arial
You need to get over 400 degrees to get the coffee roasted.  If you
are roasting with an electric wok, it may not get hot enough but just
because the dial only goes to 400 that does not mean it doesn't get
hotter.  If you can produce a second crack I believe you are getting
over 400. I don't use a thermometer but I usually make my first
roasting of a  new coffee in a wok over a wood or gas fire to learn
the bean.  I think the wok gives more of your senses access to the
roasting process and I like to know what to expect from a bean when I
use a method that reduces my ability to see, smell or hear the
roasting beans.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires 
in La Place, Alabama.  
--Apple-Mail-1-400081994--
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8) From: Mike McGinness
From: "jim gundlach" 
<Snip>
Ditto. 400 roasted bean temp' is the first considered fully roasted,
Cinnamon per KD's book. At this light stage a couple days rest would be
highly advisable. BTW, if you don't have the book 'Home Coffee Roasting' by
Kenneth Davids I highly recommend it. It's informational and enjoyable
reading. I got it when I first started home roasting and still learn from
it.
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
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