HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Turbo Crazy Observations. Long! (3 msgs / 172 lines)
1) From: Bob at classicalcup
Hi all,
I have been a dedicated lurker and student of this
list for quite awhile and I enjoy both the serious
informative posts as well as the friendly banter.  I
thought I would chime in with my opinion of and
experience with the Ryuji Suzuki inspired "Turbo
Crazy" roasting method.  
I had been using both a Home Innovations Precision and
an Alpenrost with wonderful success but I always felt
limited by the small roast loads.  I was constantly
looking for a roaster which could do an "easy" half
pound or better and when I read the post about the
Turbo Crazy I got really excited.  I immediately
invested in a convection oven and Stir Crazy and began
experimenting with roast duration, methods and loads. 
I must admit I read Ted Simpsons post with some
trepidation as he described his less than stellar
results with this system.  I (on the other hand) have
had nothing but excellent results with the system and
I believe it is because I have not tried to make it
"rocket science".  For example, I find that if you
simply rest the lid of the convection oven on the
wings of the Stir Crazy you not only get excellent
ventilation (which allows smoke to escape) but you
also allow almost all of the chaff to exit via the gap
between the lid  and the rim of the SC.  Placing the
unit in a low, wide box allows you to catch the chaff
which is blown out of the roaster.  
I believe that Ted may have unintentionally
concentrated the heat of the oven by raising the lid
with his "cake ring"... hence the meltdown of his
center plastic nut.  I have used this system for well
over 50 roasts of varying sizes and durations and have
had no trouble with the center nut other than slight
warping.  I also believe that modifying the stirring
blades (adding tubing) is unnecessary and is perhaps
detrimental to the action of the SC.  
I did make a slight adjustment to the blades in that I
bent one side up at a SLIGHT angle and left the other
side horizontal.  This seems to agitate the beans
perfectly regardless of the load size.  This is the
only change I have made to the otherwise stock
components of this system.  I plug both units into my
exterior socket and (knock on wood) have had no
problem with blown circuits.  I believe the combined
draw on this plug may be partially responsible for the
longer roast duration I achieve. 
I like my roasts to end between 13 and 16 minutes
(depending upon coffee type and variety).  I enjoy
coffee with body and as you know, longer roast times
accentuate that characteristic.  I use a different
method of roasting with the Turbo Crazy than Ryuji in
that I start the Turbo oven first and then eventually
start the stir crazy.  I do not pre heat either
component.  I have two of these combinations so I
simply cycle between them for perfect results every
time.  Here is an example of the method I use to roast
a 350 gram load into second crack but just before oil
beads on the beans.
I pour the coffee into the SC and spread it evenly
around the bottom of the agitator.  I set the Turbo
oven for 400 degrees, place it evenly upon the SC and
turn it on.  At around 3 minutes I plug the SC in for
2 full rotations and then I unplug it.  At 6 minutes I
plug it in for the duration of the roast.  I then
increase the temp to 425.  First crack begins with
very distinct cracks at between 7-8 minutes and lasts
until about 8 1/2 to 9 1/2 minutes into the roast.  I
then turn the temp on the oven down to 200 degrees for
30 - 45 seconds.  Although I do not have the equipment
to measure exact temperature changes, this drop in
temp seems to slow the roast and extend the time
between 1st and 2nd crack.  I then turn the oven up to
475 degrees and wait until second crack begins at
about 12 - 13 minutes.  I like to wait until the
sights and sounds tell me the roast is to my liking (I
cannot smell anything) and I then remove the oven lid
and while the SC is still rotating, I pour the beans
into a very large stainless steel bowl.  I then apply
cooling air from a medium speed fan and agitate the
beans until cool.  I then transfer the coffee to a gas
vent bag and wait the appropriate time for the coffee
to rest.  The end result depends upon my skill with my
Mazzer mini / Livia 90 combo.  I have yet to find any
fault with this roasting method or the flavor of the
coffee I  produce with it.  Like Ryuji I feel this
method accentuates the positives of both air and drum
roasting.  I generally do not roast less than 245
grams of coffee and have gone up to 450 grams and
still gotten excellent results.  I believe with some
trial and error, it might be possible to roast the
magic "515" with this system and achieve stellar
results. This is not a "set it and forget it" method
but if you are willing to invest the time and really
hone your skill you will produce superior results and
enjoy larger batch sizes.  I roast for my wife and
myself as well as for a few choice individuals in my
office so larger batch sizes are a necessity for me. 
I pull espresso shot or I brew in my French press or
Silex vacuum system and the coffee is stunningly good
regardless of the grind or brewing method employed. 
I want to thank you Ryuji for your inspiration.  This
system is exactly what I needed  and the price is more
than right.  
If anyone else is using the Turbo Crazy for roasting
how about posting your methods so that we can continue
to learn from each other.  
Sorry about the long post but it is difficult to
convey my observations and results with lesser
verbiage.
 
Bob
Roasting and enjoying delicious "Sweet Marias" coffees
in the suburbs of Atlanta.
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cuphttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: TFisher511
Excellent post Bob,
Your post was not too long at all with the details you conveyed. If I ever 
crazy enough to roast larger batch sizes, I just may go Turbo Crazy and will 
refer to your post to get me started.
Glad you are enjoying this caffeinated hobby with us!
Terry F
<Snip>

3) From: Simpson
Bob, you've inspired me to revisit this method. I think you may be right
about the inadvertent overheating caused by the sealed system I used.
FWIW I think that the turbo oven is a dandy roaster in principle and
what I'd really like to do is build a dedicated stirring unit with a bit
more oomph than the stir-crazy and use it with the turbo oven. I think
the result would be easily able to roast large batches evenly and under
good control.
Thanks for re-enthusing me!
Ted


HomeRoast Digest