HomeRoast Digest


Topic: variac (56 msgs / 1144 lines)
1) From: Les & Becky
Hey Jim, "roasting over Pecan fires", how can be hook a variac up to our
wood fires?  I just got my new roasting basket via e-bay, and am looking
forward to practicing some more of the mystical roasting of yester-year!  I
have a vairac, and I refuse to hook it up to my roasters!  Hey, lets not
scare all the newbies away thinking we have to have science degrees just to
roast some good brew.  All kidding aside, I have been enjoying the profile
posts.  I have been learning some new things and who knows just as I said I
would never go espresso, (now I am hooked on Americanos) I might give the
variac a try.  However, I am more intrigued and challenged by the fire
techniques as my new challenge.
Les
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2) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Les & Becky" 
<Snip>
It's simple, will it be one log or two!  
MM;-)
Home Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
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3) From: John - In Deep Southern Texas
So Mike, are you now advocating a smooth transition over the range of the
roast?  I mean - log and log log sound very linear.  So do I use logarithms
or linear equations?
John - got to cut back on the shots

4) From: Mike McGinness
From: "John - In Deep Southern Texas" 
<Snip>
logarithms
<Snip>
Linear at first then logarithmic.  Actually I'm not advocating any
profile yet. Don't know nearly enough. I was testing fast vs. slow only
hoping for a big difference in divots! And failing to find it, again
boo-hoo. This is just the beginning of roast profile taste comparisons for
me...
MM;-)
Home Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
Time to look for a charity to donate fresh roasted coffee to, not a bad
idea. Good 'excuse' which enables more roast play!
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: jim gundlach
On Wednesday, June 19, 2002, at 08:54 PM, Les & Becky wrote:
<Snip>
And when you get good with the fire you can control the rate of the 
roast in several ways.  One is to feed the fire with small pieces of 
wood to get quick heat, use a stick to spread out the coals to slow it 
down.  Also the speed of rotation or agitation has an effect.  Fast 
action means slow heating.  Also amount of beans in the popper.  A few 
ounces of beans roast quicker than a pound does.  Be careful to leave 
room for expansion of the beans during the roast.  I once over filled 
the popper and I had to stop because the beans would no longer agitate.
I must be slow this evening, I can't think of any way to use the variac, 
if I had one, on the wood fire.  But I am beginning to think I may go 
ahead and pipe compressed air to the kitchen.  Just need to find some 
way to make it look good.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
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6) From: Steven Dover

7) From: Jcpxyz1
Hey, Mike McGinness, that bargain on a 2KW variac ($125.00, inc. S & H) made 
me stand at attention. I've been browsing lately for such a bargain - if you 
still have the info on it, and it is still available, I'm all ears (except 
when it comes to second crack - they're so worn out that I can just make 
first crack with difficulty, and with the HWP I can't even hear that) :-) - 
I'm making do with mainly sight and smell 'till I conquer my pride and go to 
a hearing aid.
Jim Price
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8) From: Dan Bollinger
There are 41 Variacs on ebay.  My HWP draws 1500W the nameplate says.  Peak
draw according to my Amprobe is 12.2A

9) From: Mike McGinness
From: 
<Snip>
made
<Snip>
you
<Snip>
I got mine from Circuit Specialists Inc.  for $109.95 + s/h.http://www.web-tronics.com/freedmmoffer.htmlThe checkout doesn't calculate s/h, just says $7 minimum actual calculated">http://store.yahoo.com/webtronics/varacouttran.htmlTo get the free DMM enter promo code XYZZY seehttp://www.web-tronics.com/freedmmoffer.htmlThe checkout doesn't calculate s/h, just says $7 minimum actual calculated
at time of shipping. I just checked, my actual total was $125.21, ok over
125! But I don't feel I was over charged on s/h. This be a heavy puppy!
MM;-)
Home Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

10) From: John - In Deep Southern Texas
How times change.  John Fluke Co. was a client when I was the field engineer
for a semiconductor company that supplied the r2r ladder and later the ADC
DAC chips - when the Fluke digitals first came out you couldn't touch one
for under $200 - now they're giving them away!  I have a gold 820 that was a
presentation from them for our help with the project.  It is worth more than
it would cost just because of the memories attached.

11) From: Catherine Marley, M.D.
Jcpxyz1 wrote:
<Snip>
I guess you could get a cheap stethoscope and tape it to some part of your
roaster to get some amplification of second crack noise.
-- 
For the conservation of the Tibetan Lhasa Apso,
Regards, Cathy http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.lhasa-apso.orghomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

12) From: Penelope
Sometime around 09:39 6/29/02, Mike McGinness typed:
<Snip>
I occasionally use a surplus company for a wide array of "tech".  Included 
are various variable transformers: $79.50 - 250.  I didn't particularly 
check their capacities, but....
They are C&H Sales @ 1-800-325-9465 orhttp://www.candhsales.com--  --
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

13) From: David Waterfill

14) From:
Perhaps someone will figure out a way to make this work.  I tried it on my
roaster and I couldn't hear anything, I also tried one of the mechanics
versions that have a long probe on the end, still nothing-  too much
background noise?
Scott
<Snip>
your
<Snip>
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15) From: Angelo
There are cheap transducer mics that could be taped to the glass. Fed 
through an amp with basic bass/treble controls, one could probably filter 
out some of the unwanted frequencies, so that the cracks would be 
predominant...Just a thought...
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>
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16) From: David Lewis
At 7:53 PM -0500 6/30/02, David Waterfill wrote:
<Snip>
You don't need a used one. Any auto parts store will have something 
called a mechanic's stethoscope for $10 or so.
Best,
	David
-- 
"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, 
signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are 
not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed."
	--Dwight D. Eisenhower
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17) From: Ron
Has anyone installed a digital volt meter in there variac. The meter seems
to lack accuracy. I've also noticed when I roasting with the Alp near the
end it tended to go up and down like the heating element was cycling on and
off. It did make a noticeable difference in roast time from 18 min to 16
min. 2nd crack
off to work
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC

18) From: Ben Treichel
Not in, but I ran wires from the taps on the el-cheapo to my old, yet 
nice, volt meter. I mostly profile by voltage, and tweak by temperature.
Ron wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: Lee XOC
< On Behalf Of Ron
< Sent: Thursday, 08 May, 2003 4:21 AM
<
< Has anyone installed a digital volt meter in there variac.
< The meter seems to lack accuracy.
I haven't, but I have had that exact thought!   Are their such things as
digital volt panel meters?  I have seen digital all-purposes displays,
and analog volt-specific panel meters, but the only digital voltmeter
I've seen (so far) is in a prebuilt package like a multimeter (which I
assume uses an all-purpose display along with other electronics).  Iow I
think it would actually need to be a little computer in a box, sort of,
not just a meter.  There would need to be an a/d converter, and some
programmed chip to make the correct LEDs light up etc.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
---------------------------------

20) From: Bob Trancho
I simply plugged a three way adapter in to the variac, put the probes
from the DMM in one plug and the roaster in another.
Bob Trancho
<Snip>

21) From: Rick Farris
Ron writes:
<Snip>
That's because the heating element was cycling on and off. ;-)
The way the Alp works is by heating up to 550 and then controlling
(holding) the temperature there.  The way it controls the temperature is
by cycling the heating element on and off.  Because the heating element
draws so much current it creates a voltage drop across the path between
the breaker panel and the place the voltmeter is attached to the
circuit.
That's what you're seeing, an effect of the temperature control.  Don't
feel too bad, when I first got my Alp & Variac, I sat there and turned
the knob up and down in time with the heater.   After a while I figured
it out.
As to attaching an easier to read voltmeter, because I bought my Variac
from that place in Phoenix where most of us got our KRMs, and because
the order was for more than $100, I got a free DVM.  I think you can buy
one there for about $20.  Same place the $20 digital thermocouple meters
come from.
I attach mine by plugging one of those one-plug to three-output adapters
into the Variac and pushing the meter leads into one of the unused
outlets.
Incidentally, the idea that Alps need Variacs came from the older model
Alps which didn't adjust themselves for ambient temperature or line
voltage.  Yours and mine are the newer v1.1 models, so I never bother
with the Variac anymore.
-- Rick

22) From: miKe mcKoffee

23) From: Ron
Brilliant Bob, and simple I like it and I don't have to change the Variac  I
was thinking of putting Jacks in and wire them to the meter leads, and plug
my Fluke in the jacks, but your way is easy. I like easy. thanks
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC

24) From: Ron
snip from Rick:
<Snip>
Thanks for the great information Rick, Did you notice that your alp on the
variac with the voltage regulated to 120
roasted quicker?
Maybe it was because I have mind going through a HD 12 ft. extension cord.
rolling 2nd without the variac 18:20
with the variac 16:45.
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC

25) From: Ron
Snip from Lee's post:
<Snip>
Lee after reading Mike's post I think Bob and Rick with the 3 way switch and
a voltmeter is the answer.

26) From: Ron
Ben wrote:>
<Snip>
 Ben, thanks for the reply. I was going to wire jacks, but I think I will go
with the 3 way plug
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC

27) From: miKe mcKoffee

28) From: Ron
Yep that will work, thanks Mike

29) From: Ben Treichel
Yeah, I wish I had thought of it!
Ron wrote:
<Snip>

30) From: David Lewis
At 7:21 AM -0400 5/8/03, Ron wrote:
<Snip>
I thought about it. What I did instead was get a three-outlet adapter 
cube for about $2.50 (the cube has very solid conductors in it) and 
plug it into the Variac. Then I plug the Hottop in to one of the 
outlets and the probes from an old $25 Radio Shack DMM in to one of 
the others. That doesn't look as good, but works well and is a lot 
easier and cheaper. Why, you may ask, can you get a DMM for $25 but a 
panel meter is $100? Manufacturing volumes.
Best,
	David
-- 
Less than 0.1 percent of the U.S. population gave 83 percent of all 
itemized campaign contributions for the 2002 elections, according to 
the Center for Responsive Politics.

31) From: Lee XOC
< On Behalf Of Ron
< Sent: Thursday, 08 May, 2003 6:08 PM 
< 
< Snip from Lee's post:
< 
< > I haven't, but I have had that exact thought!   Are their 
< > such things as digital volt panel meters?
< 
< Lee after reading Mike's post I think Bob and Rick with the 3 
< way switch and a voltmeter is the answer.
I agree!  (three way outlet I thought though)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
---------------------------------

32) From: Lee XOC
< On Behalf Of miKe mcKoffee
< Sent: Thursday, 08 May, 2003 6:34 PM
<
< This pic doesn't show the voltmeter plugged in but it shows
< the three way
< plug I used with variac & voltmeter before building
< FrankenFormer. (focus of
< pics was *hot to* split wire Rosto...)
<http://home.attbi.com/~mdmint/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmYea, I'm going to do that too.  I see you have (had?) the 20A KRM.  I'm
going to post some pictures of the my coffee lab once I get the DC
control complete. It's a little comical that all our pictures are going
to have some sort of KRM variac lurking in them somewhere.
But much more comical is the rheostat I got in the mail today.  150W
huh?  Hmm, that would be about, oh, a 5" diameter rheostat!!  I almost
fainted when I first saw the thing....http://members.cox.net/xoc/rheostat-front.jpghttp://members.cox.net/xoc/rheostat-back.jpg
In case you can't tell, the coin is a dime.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
---------------------------------

33) From: Ed Needham
Looks to be about 1940's vintage.  Very similar to a lot of the stuff my
father had lying around in his HAM radio shack W9AYB (not the business).  He
built radios before WW2, was a radioman onboard the USS Carina and dropped
out of the whole process when transistors became popular.  I think I
inherited 'tinkering' from him.
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!http://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

34) From: John Abbott
Ed,
Your dad probably ran a spark gap generator before ww2 - and those
hummers were HUGE! A lot of hams dropped out when tubes became
unavailable.  There is a guy called The Tube Man that draws a monster
crowd at the Dayton Hamfest (granddaddy of them all) every year. My
neighbor in Chapel Hill (I moved when the war started) was W4HPC and he
had a shack to behold - and he got me started in my love of electronics
and tinkering.   Take a look at the marking on the bottom of that pot
again.
John - W5JSA  J S A
On Fri, 2003-05-09 at 08:38, Ed Needham wrote:
    Looks to be about 1940's vintage.  Very similar to a lot of the stuff my
    father had lying around in his HAM radio shack W9AYB (not the business).  He
    built radios before WW2, was a radioman onboard the USS Carina and dropped
    out of the whole process when transistors became popular.  I think I
    inherited 'tinkering' from him.
    Ed Needham
    To Absurdity and Beyond!
   http://www.homeroaster.com    ed
    
    ****************************************
    **********************************************

35) From: Rick Farris
I dunno, Ron.  Are you sure that the longer roast wasn't first, in a
cold roaster?  And then the shorter one was the second roast in an
already warmed up roaster?
With our versions of the Alp, with a higher line voltage, the only thing
that *should* happen is for the "on" periods of the heater to be shorter
than with a lower line voltage.
-- Rick

36) From: Lee XOC
< On Behalf Of Ed Needham
< Sent: Friday, 09 May, 2003 6:38 AM
<
< Looks to be about 1940's vintage.
I can believe it.  Luckily it was inexpensive.
<  Very similar to a lot of the stuff my
< father had lying around in his HAM radio shack W9AYB (not the
< business).  He
< built radios before WW2, was a radioman onboard the USS
< Carina and dropped
< out of the whole process when transistors became popular.  I think I
< inherited 'tinkering' from him.
My father (who's now 78) used to build computers for RCA back in the
days when those things were huge arrangements of vacuum tubes.  He went
into different work when solid-state came along ... guess it just wasn't
his thing.
I'll let you know how this monster works.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
---------------------------------

37) From: Ron
snip from Ricks post:
<Snip>
No it was a cold roaster, I will experiment tommorrw and keep a close eye on
things.
Ron
rnkyle

38) From: Brian Kamnetz
I had never heard of a variac before joining this list, and the only thing 
I know about electricity is that I stay away from it every chance I get, 
but am wondering what specs are desirable in a vairac intended as a 
roasting accessory?
For example, I see one on eBay with these specs listed:
"Micronta 500 watt variac. Ideal for testing of electronic equipment. 
Voltage variable from 0 to 130 VAC."
Is that enough info to tell whether or not this unit would be satisfactory 
for roasting?
Thanks,
brian
At 10:14 AM 2/13/2004 -0500, you wrote:
<Snip>

39) From: Ralph Cohen
SweetMarias has a nice variac athttp://sweetmarias.com/prod.roastkits.shtmlabout halfway down the
page.
Ralph Cohen
On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 10:16:51 -0700, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>

40) From: Jim Schulman
On 13 Feb 2004 at 10:16, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
You need 1500 watts to power a roaster's heater. Some 500 watt 
variacs, designed for motor control, can do handle 1500 watts 
for the few hours with cooling spells of a roasting session. But 
a Micronta (Radio Shack) piece of equipment can hardly be relied 
on to handle deliver the rated specs. 
Look for 1500 watts or 1.5KVA (that's the way real variacs are 
described)
Jim

41) From: Mike McGinness
Yes it's enough information, but 500watt would be too small for heater
control as a rule. Would be fine for fan control. Loading rating for
variable transformers aka variacs is usually given in Amps... I've found
10Amp continous load rating more than adequate and safe.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
MCSE (Maniacal Coffee Systems Engineer/Enthusiast;-)
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

42) From: Pamela Chadwick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Well, the new variac arrived yesterday. This morning we got up at 5, no =
coffee!! Not a bean at my boyfriend's house. We left & we to my place, =
there was enough for one small pot. So while we were drinking that, we =
were outside trying out that new toy. I love it! Oh the added control, =
it's marvelous! 
My boyfriend was supposed to get me a variac, he knows more about them =
then I do because he uses them at his machine sop. He was disappointed =
that I got impatient & went ahead and ordered one. But, he has changed =
his mind. He said it is better for our purposes that what he would have =
bought and had to alter. I love it, two plug ins, small footprint and =
Bight Red! What a deal!
I roasted some Bugesu. I am anxious to try it after the way you all have =
raved about it.

43) From: Ben Treichel
Pamela Chadwick wrote:
<Snip>
Yeah, that altering thing can get to be a pain in the butt. Enjoy.
Ben
<Snip>
45 (m)

44) From: Gary Townsend
 Vic DeAmelia wrote:
Brian would be correct, want to slow down not speed up, have to say am a
little surprised matt that your popper would handle 6 ounces tho,  vic
Hi Vic!
FWIW, I have collected, roughly 1/2 dozen each of the poppery 1's, Poppery
2's, Popcorn Pumpers 1400 watt and also the 1250 watt versions ( yellow and
white UFO shaped with the on/off switch) and also have several of the
cylindrical Pumpers that I use. The Proctor Silex Pumpers are awesome
roasters and my favorite to tweak without adding any *extra* devices.
I just open them up, remove the bimetallic (bubble shaped) piece, and ensur=
e
that the electrical contacts remain flush, sometimes I have to slightly ben=
d
them back into alignment after removing the bimetallic bubble. If you are
carefull, then you don't have to re-align the contacts, but it's not that
hard to fix. I do not remove the thermal fuse. Ever. Not a good idea. BTW, =
I
fixed several *dead* poppers by testing that fuse, and replacing them. I go=
t
a P1 (original Poppery) for free, fixed it for less than a dollar, and it
works great!
OK, The only other mod that I do to the Pumpers is to widen the slots of th=
e
roasting chamber from the outside of the chamber. Note, that the popper has
to be apart to do it correctly. If you try to do it from the inside of the
chamber, without dis-assembling it, then chances are pretty good that it
won't work. Think about a functional hood scoop on a car hood. You want to
catch the cooler air *before* it gets into the fuel induction system. I use
a small tiny 1/8" flat-tip screwdriver blade that is inserted along the
width of the slot. Then with a slight twisting motion, I'll open up, or
widen, the slot, allowing it to catch more air, before it enters the
roasting chamber. If done correctly on all of the slots, you can hardly eve=
n
tell that this has been done to the roaster, once it is re-assembled. Nifty=
.
Time to *prep* a stock popper, less than 10 minutes.
Cost. Usually less than $2. what I normally purchase thrift store poppers
for.
Result. 1250 watt Poppery 2 type poppers that roast 5 oz of green, *no
touch*, with just a little bit of tilting. I use a piece of scrap wood
molding, that has about a 3/4" rise. I also use a cold popper, no
pre-heating etc.
I can roast 6 3/8 oz of green bean, if I stir and shake with a wooden spoon=
,
but the results can be uneven. Really, I think it gets too hot, too fast,
and the fluid bed is degraded too much.
Profile? using 5 oz of beans, 1st crack is around 6 minutes, 2nd crack is
average on 12 to 13 minutes. Every popper is a little bit different. So,
I'll adjust the load 1/4 oz at a time. To speed up a roast add 1/4 oz on th=
e
next batch, until that popper is *dialed-in*. Then I'll mark the popper cas=
e
with a sharpie. I also rotate 4 poppers, 5 oz + or - 1/4 oz to net 1 # of
roasted coffee. I roast 2 times a week 1 to 1.5 #'s on roast night, and hav=
e
not killed a popper yet, after tweaking it this way.
 No extension cords, variacs, dimmer switches etc. I just adjust the load t=
o
fit the variety that I'm roasting. Oh, you will need to use a glass
hurricane chimney, as the slot widening will cause the roasted beans to spi=
n
out and over a tin can chimney ;-) I just set it in place, roast, use a
leather glove to quickly remove it, after turning the popper off, then dump
the beans quickly into a colander. Too easy. And I bought a whole box of
them at a thrift shop for about a dime apiece, so, if I break one, no big
deal ;-)
Gary
--
"I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to pleas=
e
everybody."

45) From: Frank Coster
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Has anyone had trouble with their Hottop after using a variac?. I =
recently bought a variac and within a couple of months the main fan on =
my 1 yr old Hottop died. I usually dial in the variac to 120 to 125v.
Frank 

46) From: Michael Boshes
Frank,
I had the variac before getting the hottop over a year ago so have always
used the two together. I usually keep it set at a constant 125V but have
used it up to 130 and down to 100. No problems with the fan or any part of
the hottop, both the analog original and the later digital upgrade.
I am pretty compulsive about changing filters and keeping everything as
clean as possible, so there is practically no gunk build-up on the fan. This
is IMO a more likely factor in fan longevity than variac use.
MichaelB
On 9/24/06, Frank Coster  wrote:
<Snip>

47) From: miKe mcKoffee
Fan failure is a fact of life. One of the if not the highest failure rate
component in computers and coffee roasters exposing them to even higher heat
conditions. I suspect your fan failing in the HotTop after using a variac
merely a coincidence, the fan was going to fail anyway.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Boshes
	Sent: Sunday, September 24, 2006 7:16 AM
<Snip>
	Frank,
	 
	I had the variac before getting the hottop over a year ago so have
always used the two together. I usually keep it set at a constant 125V but
have used it up to 130 and down to 100. No problems with the fan or any part
of the hottop, both the analog original and the later digital upgrade. 
	 
	I am pretty compulsive about changing filters and keeping everything
as clean as possible, so there is practically no gunk build-up on the fan.
This is IMO a more likely factor in fan longevity than variac use.
	 
	MichaelB
	 
	On 9/24/06, Frank Coster  wrote: 
		Has anyone had trouble with their Hottop after using a
variac?. I recently bought a variac and within a couple of months the main
fan on my 1 yr old Hottop died. I usually dial in the variac to 120 to 125v.
		 
		Frank

48) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
I am curious about how your variac can produce a "constant 125V".
The voltmeter that I have plugged into the second receptacle of my 
variac shows a variation from about 120V to 125V during a roast, 
depending on which functions of the HotTop are drawing current..
Dave S.
Michael Boshes wrote:  
<Snip>

49) From: raymanowen
The voltage is controlled by a Regulator of Voltage
On 9/24/06, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

50) From: Frank Coster
I just usually have it set at 120 or 125. I don't go above that setting for 
fear of damaging the Hottop. What the actual voltage is unknown other than 
what the variac gauge is telling me.
Frank Coster

51) From: Frank Coster
OK, sounds reasonable. It just went out almost exactly 1 yr after purchase 
and within 3-4 weeks after starting to use the variac. Murphy's Law, it 
always fails right after the warranty expires ;-). On the plus side, Michael 
at Hottop USA sent a new one out within 2 days and for a reasonable price.
Frank Coster

52) From: Douglas Strait

53) From: Rob Stewart
I try to not run my fan motors at low voltage unless they are designed for 
it. If you are turning the voltage way down I would think that could be a 
problem.
Rob

54) From: Scot Murphy
On Sep 24, 2006, at 1:28 PM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Is that an elected or appointed position?
Scot "throwing my hat in the ring" Murphy

55) From: Michael Boshes
As my Variac's current Regulator of Voltage (self-appointed position) I set
the line voltage to 125 before starting, then keep the fan-only setting to
125 throughout the roast. It drops to about 120 every time the heater kicks
in.
The fan is meant to be an exhaust fan, not a blower like hot air poppers, so
probably an intentional design rather than a misteak.
On 9/24/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
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--
MichaelB

56) From: raymanowen
It's  ...probably an intentional misteak rather than a design. [Xerox and
Minolta fuser bearings suffered a similar fate.]
Is it possible the Enjanears didn't realize the fault combination when they
prototyped the design? There are ways of handling high temperature air. Some
can't find a good one with both hands.
You inherited Regulator of Voltage when ya paid your bucks and discoved you
bought one of the prototypes.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Ran out of roast- going to enjoy this E. Sidamo from its youth- HG/DB
On 9/24/06, Michael Boshes  wrote:
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