HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 7 stage roasting results(long) (3 msgs / 80 lines)
1) From: Charlie Herlihy
Late last week I posted my attempt to duplicate, as much as possible in a non computerized brick oven, the 7 step roasting stages that Black Bear coffee describes on it's web site. Jim Gundlach also tried the same with his barbecue roaster. The coffee rested enough and today I tried a pot each of light, full city, and oily Viennese roasts. All were as good as I've ever accomplished in years of roasting and I'm particularly impressed with the light, city, roast since that's were I tend to screw up most often.                                                                           Newbies lurking out there, and experianced home roasters who still feel they're flailing around a little (like me)-do what I did and print out the BB roasting process page because it is a sound basis for developing roasting profiles for any bean. I've soured many a roast that I wanted to be a light one by starting at a moderate roaster temp and gently raising the heat being so carefull not to  darke
 n the beans  and over roast them by mistake. Only my compost pile benifited from this foolish notion. Very hot (600degrees) does not burn green beans! Direct conductive heat from a red hot pan or solid drum might singe them, but not very hot air. When they turn yellow then the moisture is coming all the way out. In fact it is the only time since being dried on the farm that a bean is soft. That's when you turn down the heat, however you can, to a reasonable temp and let the beans stabilize temps internally, externally and equally among themselves. I still don't have a way to measure bean temp. The webber thermometer doesn't react nearly fast enough and I can't let the beans sit still while I wait. Thermocoupler with digital readout needed soon. Meanwhile I just guess that the bean temp is about the ideal of 230 when they go from yellow to brown and start to smell sweet and nutty, no more vapor,not yet smoke. Up the temp, way up untill the first little sign of first crack the
 n ease right off. There should be a nice reliable momentum built up and as long as your roaster temp is steady at something over 450 it won't stall and bake the beans or need to be raised high enough to char them, which happens very easily at this stage. I like to lower the temp a little more at second crack, but the experts say ( definetevly!) not to let coffee roast with just it's own internally genated heat. Always be adding some of the energy. I don't know why, just do it. A quick cool down at any time now will produce great coffee, it only depends on how roasted you want it. Jim was going to post the cupping results of his 7 stage barbeque roast "Monday" -Jim? Did you read this far?   ;^)
Charlie ,   still roasting over hot bricks
---------------------------------
Do You Yahoo!?
Sign-up for Video Highlights of 2002 FIFA World Cup

2) From: jim gundlach
On Monday, June 24, 2002, at 08:22 PM, Charlie Herlihy wrote:
<Snip>
Yes, I got it tested.  I think I went too slow  and I now know what the =
baked flavor is.   My usual roast takes 13 to 15 minutes.  I slowed this =
one down to the point that it took about 25.   I think the 
recommendation to never stop adding head is to prevent the baked 
flavor.  Part of the problem was the unusual gusts of wind I was trying =
to roast in.  I'll try it again when the wood is dry and weather is 
stable.  Been getting rain lately and I neglected to put some wood in 
the dry.  Roasted some Uganda in the wok to tide us over.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Mike McGinness
Way cool work Charlie. I've been doing similar with variac/Caffe' Rosto
combo. I totally agree much better light roasting. Much more even. I've come
up with a 5 or 6 stage process, depending if you count the cool down. I
don't have a way to super blast BB's first stage so it's omitted. Voltages
for 70 ambient: I start very low, around 85v to 230f. This takes about 2min.
Previously with full 120v I'd been around 300f at 2min. At 230f up to 120v
to 340f. At 340f down to 110v. How long I hold to 110v depends on my target
roast. I drop to 105v 15 degrees before target. Early results tasting
excellent. Noticeably better short rested.
Two roasts I did today:
151gr JBM Moy Hall target 420f in 10min ambient 60f
88v to 230f 1:59
120v to 340f 3:37
112v to 400f 6:24
105v to 410f 9:05 (looked like it might stall so upped)
107v to 420f 10:40
Later in the day...
151gr Panama Songbird target 415f in 10 min (going for lightest I've done)
ambient 76f
86v to 230f 2:00
118v to 340f 3:35
108v to 400f 7:08
103v to 405f 9:00
105v to 415f 9:49
Haven't brewed them yet but munched beans tasted good.
I plan on a direct comparison testing straight gradual ramp up versus this
method.
I keep the Weber thermometer in the beans mass at all times so don't have
the same response time problem. However, I still also plan on getting a
Fluke thermocouple, at the minimum for tracking air temp at blow-in point.
Been informed it's time for me to put the Teriyaki Kona marinated steaks on
the Traeger...
MM;-)
Home Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


HomeRoast Digest