HomeRoast Digest


Topic: resting time (108 msgs / 3736 lines)
1) From: John - In Deep Southern Texas
Ich bitte, um mich mit Ihnen, La Minita zu unterscheiden Costa Rican bin =
am
besten nach siebzig zwei Stunden Rest!  Und wir haben Weisen des Bildens =
Sie
mögen es so.
Linux: Because you can!
All rise for the Microsoft Anthem: "BAAAA!"
--

2) From: John - In Deep Southern Texas
Could this be the reason most of us are on THIS list?  It is HERE that I
learned most of what I know about coffee from folks who have shared their
discoveries.  I for one am a believer in roasting periods.
--

3) From: John - In Deep Southern Texas
I know the feeling Ron.  I did it every Sunday for 23 years :O)
John -  MY ISH Arrived and I've been roasting!!!
--

4) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It seems to me that 48 hrs. at least with my limited experience is about =
right for most of the coffee I roast? 
I roasted a blend last night in my FR+ Yemen , Sumatra , and Harrar I =
will rest it 48 hrs. any suggestion on rest time for this blend, Roasted =
aggressive full city.
  
Ron Kyle
Roasting coffee in South Carolina
rnkyle

5) From: coffenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ron,
 
Having roasted all three of those coffees many times, I've found that
2-3 days is optimum with my preference being on the 3rd day.  I usually
roast them to just a few snaps into 2nd.  
 
I still remember the first time I roasted Harar and was very anxious to
try it.  So, I brewed some after just 24 hrs rest and thought it was
horrible.  At 72hrs rest, I thought I was in coffee heaven.
 
Coffenut  :^)

6) From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Bob=20Cassinelli?=
 Coffee is best 12-24 hours after being roasted. 
Anyone who disagrees with me is not American ;).
 
  coffenut  skrev: 
Ron,
Having roasted all three of those coffees many times, I’ve found that 2-3 days is optimum with my preference being on the 3rd day.  I usually roast them to just a few snaps into 2nd.  
I still remember the first time I roasted Harar and was very anxious to try it.  So, I brewed some after just 24 hrs rest and thought it was horrible.  At 72hrs rest, I thought I was in coffee heaven.
Coffenut  :^)

7) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Durn.  We gotta move again, and my family only got here 200 years ago.   =
:(   
  Coffee is best 12-24 hours after being roasted. 
  Anyone who disagrees with me is not American ;). 
   
    coffenut  skrev: 
    Ron,
     
    Having roasted all three of those coffees many times, I've found =
that 2-3 days is optimum with my preference being on the 3rd day.  I =
usually roast them to just a few snaps into 2nd.  
     
    I still remember the first time I roasted Harar and was very anxious =
to try it.  So, I brewed some after just 24 hrs rest and thought it was =
horrible.  At 72hrs rest, I thought I was in coffee heaven.
     
    Coffenut  :^)

8) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks to all the list members who repleyed to question. I will try it =
at 24, then 48, then 72 . I will let you know what my preference is,
Ron Kyle
Roasting in South Carolina
rnkyle

9) From: Steven
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I just wanted to gadfly a bit...I'm posting a long message from Barry =
Jarrett...taken from alt.coffee and posted about a year ago.  This =
started a l-o-n-g thread -70 messages worth...At any rate it is entirely =
thought provoking.
someone asked me today why i think resting coffee is overrated....
here's my response, and my nomex undies are on.  :)
first, the notion of resting coffee is contrary to the idea of fresh
coffee.  resting coffee in an oxidative environment is, in fact,
staling the coffee.  i does not surprise me that people who are new to
roasting tend to prefer coffee that has staled for a few days as truly
fresh coffee doesn't really taste like what they're used to.  yes,
coffee straight from the roaster tastes *different* than coffee that
is a day or more older, but that is the taste of *fresh* coffee.  if
the idea of home roasting is to secure a source of fresh coffee, then
the freshness advantage of home roasting over buying from a local
microroaster (or even mail order) is negated by allowing home roasted
coffee to rest from one to seven days.
second, some ideas that are tossed around alt.coffee as "suggestions"
all too often assume the status of "gospel".  witness the 205F "ideal"
brew temp for espresso, as *suggested* by david schomer....  the
suggestion that *some* coffees *may* benefit by resting for a day or
so after roasting has almost come to be taken as *all* coffees *must*
rest in order to get the best flavor, and this simply IS NOT TRUE.
third, the alleged benefit of resting varies not only by producing
country, but by region, farm, bag lot, and degree of roast, and can be
further influenced by brewing method.  saying "kenya coffee must be
rested for X days" is a wildly inaccurate statement*, and yet that
sort of thing appears on alt.coffee all too often.
fourth, there is a tendency towards hasty generalization.  mr.
homeroaster roasts 3 oz of Bean Y on monday, and consumes those beans
over the following three days, noting the subtle shift in taste**, and
decides that Bean Y tastes best on the third day.  for subsequent
roasts of Bean Y, mr. homeroaster lets the beans sit for three days
before consuming them, patting himself on the back for being so clever
as to avoid that "just roasted" taste (nevermind that's why he got
into home roasting in the first place!).  the problem is:  it is a
different roast, and might not behave the same way as the first roast.
by allowing the beans to sit for three days, mr. homeroaster *might*
have just missed the prime point for that batch, which might have been
day two, or even immediately post roast!  generalizing a taste apogee
from batch to batch is erroneous, absent constant tasting.  every
roast is different, sometimes subtly, sometimes not, and that
difference may or may not influence the taste apogee.
finally, yes, the taste of coffee shifts with age, and sometimes i
prefer a coffee that is a day or so old over that same coffee just
roasted.  more often, though, i just note that the taste is
*different* without feeling it is better or worse.  i might think
lasagna tastes better as leftovers on the next day, but that doesn't
mean that i didn't enjoy the original dinner!  if i roast a coffee, i
should be able to enjoy it right from the roaster, as well as the next
day or the day after.  when i cup my coffee samples, i often wait a
day between roasting and cupping because virtually none of my
customers are going to ever brew a pot of coffee with beans right from
the roaster, and i want to make sure of the taste they're going to
get.
--barry
*case in point:  i narrowed my selection of kenya samples down to two
different estate lots.  samples were cupped blind right after
roasting, and then again the following day (and this was done several
times to minimize outside influences).  samples were cupped against my
current kenya offering, which was roasted at the same time.  Sample A
was generally my favorite when cupped right after roasting, but Sample
B was my favorite on the following day.  Neither sample sucked at any
point, they just tasted different.  i ended up buying Sample B because
i felt it tasted better than Sample A on the day after roast, which is
closest to how my customers will experience the coffee.  
**noticing subtle taste differences from day to day, absent
comparitive cupping (cupping the coffee against other coffees, or
another roast of the same coffee), is highly inaccurate.  what you're
having for breakfast probably has a greater influence on your taste
perception than any variance in coffee flavor from day to day.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
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10) From: David Marley
This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
This only adds to confusion of coffee.  As if I don't have enough troubles
keeping everything else as constant as I can, but then I can't assume my
coffee is at it's peak at 48 hrs.  Thats it, I'm going back to Folgers
because at least it CONSISTENTLY horrible :-)
 
David Marley
Just order La Berlina because of Peer Pressure

11) From: Ken Mary
I agree with everything Barry said. I started homeroasting "knowing" that 
coffees require a resting period from what I had read. However, from day
one, I nearly always brewed a cup within 5 hours, many times the beans were
still warm from the roaster. About half the time, that first brew was the
best, with the rest improving (sometimes very much so) after 2 days. In
hindsight, I believe that those roasts that were better after 2 days were
"improperly" roasted. This is a subjective statement, I know, but
"immediate" brews of some other roasts of the same lot of beans tasted equal
to or better than those made after 2 days rest from those "improper" roasts.
Either my tastes have changed, or I am better at roasting after 2 1/2 years,
but almost all of my recent roasts taste best within a few hours, with a
slow decline to staleness evident by day 4 or 5. This is independent of
coffee origin. Of course, all this is subject to change as I continue to
grow in knowledge.
--
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>
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12) From: coffenut
It's funny, but I've got just the opposite belief.  Having also brewed
coffee's right after they were roasted, I find them flat in taste
compared to resting at least 12 hours.  I have a hard time believing
that it's improper roasting that causes a roast to taste better after it
has rested.  If that were the case, we'd all be roasting improperly and
I find that one hard to believe as well.  There's just too much
agreement that resting helps develop flavor for me to buy into the
improper roasting theory.  I do believe (have experienced) that
different coffee's develop better flavors at different points of rest.
But to say that coffees are at their peak flavor right after roasting
doesn't align with my experiences at all.
Coffenut  :^)

13) From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Bob=20Cassinelli?=
 What about resting it initailly; to let the CO2 'evaporate'? 
 
  David Marley  skrev: This only adds to confusion of coffee.  As if I don't have enough troubles keeping everything else as constant as I can, but then I can't assume my coffee is at it's peak at 48 hrs.  Thats it, I'm going back to Folgers because at least it CONSISTENTLY horrible :-) David MarleyJust order La Berlina because of Peer Pressure

14) From: David Marley
This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
Now maybe it' s just me but I thought I read information about resting goes
beyond just Co2 evaporation. The "rest time" also let sugars and other
elements do their flavor development when you let the coffee rest.  
 
David Marley

15) From: Charlie Herlihy
Coffeenut wrote;>It's funny, but I've got just the opposite belief.  Having also brewed
coffee's right after they were roasted, I find them flat in taste
compared to resting at least 12 hours.  I have a hard time believing
that it's improper roasting that causes a roast to taste better after 
it
has rested.
 I hate to disagree with a coffee nut, but agree more with Steve, just from my own experiances. As Tom likes to point out, very freshly roasted coffee grinds are resistant to full infusion with hot water in a drip system because of CO2 being released in great quantities. French press, espresso, or "cowboy style" brews overcome this The cup I'm drinking as I write this came out of the roaster 10 minutes ago, it;s fantastic, and the only improvement from resting will be a stronger aroma when I open the jar. Loss of intensity begins after only 2 or 3 days, max. Slightly underdone or stalled roasts are undrinkable without a rest, and certain very high acid ( like"miel", some Kenyas) coffees are easier to take with some rest. So I guess it depends on what you like. I tend to like the kinds of coffees that don't need much resting. 
Charlie
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16) From: coffenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Disagreement is good, and often brings to light more information.  My
method of brewing has been primarily drip until just this week when I
got the Cona-vac.  I don't have a French Press or Espresso machine, so
maybe that is why my experience is so different from those who love
brewing freshly roasted coffee.
 
Coffenut  :^)

17) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Wow I just read my own post and noticed several spelling errors. Sorry, =
after I learn to roast coffee, I better learn to spell, There is nothing =
more humbling then to feel stupid in front of a group of people
Ron Kyle
Roasting in South Carolina
rnkyle

18) From: Charlie Herlihy
Coffee nut wrote;> 
Disagreement is good, and often brings to light more information.  My method of brewing has been primarily drip until just this week when I got the Cona-vac.  I don’t have a French Press or Espresso machine, so maybe that is why my experience is so different from those who love brewing freshly roasted coffee.
Coffenut  :^)
This SM list is grCoffenutause so many of us don't give a hnbspwhat the experts who write books say about anything if it doesn't match what we see roasting every day. I know that I've had roasts of this same coffee(Oaxaca Pluma, beginning of rolling 2nd crack) that did taste flat when cupped right away. Those roasts did get a little better with rest but never got intensly great like what I'm drinking now.  My roasting profile these days, sterthching it out a bit might be the differance(?)I've never even seen a vac pot up close so vac pot users can share their insites about certain beans, roasted a certain way, cupped at various rest times.                                         To respond to two posts at once-Ron Kyle just apologized for a post with several spelling mistakes. Danged if I could find which words were mispelled!  I misspelled Carramba! in an earlier post this morning and no one called me on it. I just spelled 'Mispelled" wrong but the spell check can't even hel
 p. Who cares    Saludos,
Charlie
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19) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks Charlie I feel better now, but still can't spell
Ron Kyle
Roasting in South Carolina
rnkyle

20) From: R.N.Kyle
Thanks John , I bet the people listing to you, didn't share the same
feelings.
Ron Kyle
Roasting in South Carolina
rnkyle

21) From: Lissa
On Fri, 2002-07-12 at 13:22, John - In Deep Southern Texas wrote:
<Snip>
I generally prefer to roast commas, myself.  Coffee is better yet.
Be well,
Lissa
being punctual...
-- 
The greatest respect we can have for law and order is
to question and challenge the people who are enforcing it.
Lenny Bruce
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

22) From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Bob=20Cassinelli?=
 fyi... 
a wonderful site for satire is www.cagle.com
 
  Lissa  skrev: On Fri, 2002-07-12 at 13:22, John - In Deep Southern Texas wrote:
<Snip>
I generally prefer to roast commas, myself. Coffee is better yet.
Be well,
Lissa
being punctual...
-- 
The greatest respect we can have for law and order is
to question and challenge the people who are enforcing it.
Lenny Bruce
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastFå den nye Yahoo! Messenger 
Nå med webkamera, stemmechat, interaktiv bakgrunn og mye mer!

23) From: EskWIRED
<Snip>
INMSHO, coffee is delicious after 4-24 hours, and goes downhill after that.
On the third day it is no longer at its peak, on the fourth day it is
undistinguished, and after that it goes in the freezer for when I run out of
fresh coffee.
Espresso drinkers, for some reason, recommend long resting times.  I don't
understand.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

24) From: John
David,
I think espresso drinkers favor short resting times. It is only for
brewed coffee that I rest CRLM 3 days. Huehue gets ready in four or five
hours and is going downhill after a couple of days. But the light roasts
for brewing benefit from the resting.
John
On Tue, 2002-09-24 at 11:06, EskWIRED wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

25) From: NOEL HONG
Resting time.  Dependent upon variety, degree of roast and most important 
personal taste. Another "adventure" in the never ending journey of 
homeroasting. For me, the length of resting time for the individual bean in 
my espresso blends and straights for Cremas/Americanos/PressPot are similar. 
  Discovered a new blend that I enjoy: Brazil Fazenda Cachoeira/Uganda 
Budadiri/Guatemala Antigua Finca Bella Carmona @ 3/2/1 ratio, roast level 
40sec/50sec/1sec into 2nd crack (HWP). Sweetbitter chocolate, hint of 
spicy-rooty, nice thick syrupy crema @ ~50% of total volume. Basically a 
syrupy crema bomb.
<Snip>
Noel V. Hong
email: nhong32590
Send and receive Hotmail on your mobile device:http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mobile.msn.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

26) From: John
Man you make that sound good!!  How close is Finca Bella Camona to
Huehuetenango Finca Huixoc? I don't have the Camona - but will give the
rest a shot using the Huixoc.
On Tue, 2002-09-24 at 12:11, NOEL HONG wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

27) From: NOEL HONG
The Huehuetenango (?finca) I have in stock to me seems brighter & more 
fruity. I'm down to the last few oz of Bella Carmona. Will be trying the 
Huehuetenango in the next blend.
<Snip>
Noel V. Hong
email: nhong32590
Join the world’s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.hotmail.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

28) From: Shauna Ellison
Some say to rest the roasted beans for  4-24 hours, and some say 72 
hours.  I also hear that coffee is really only fresh for 6 days...so if you 
rest it for 3 days (which I feels makes some taste better) then your coffee 
is only fresh for 3 days?  I roast about a pound (of Central American ie: 
Costa Rican, El Salvador...if that matters?) once a week to full city 
roast.  I have no oil on the beans after roasting, but within three days I 
have small patches of oil..  (Yes I am the oil sheen nut :o) )  So is the 
oil that seeps out of the bean what makes it stale (or not fresh) 
anymore?  --Shauna
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

29) From: Julie H Tieszen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have the following beans....
Brazil Yellow Bourbon
Rwanda Migongo Bourbon
Columbia Excelso 13556
Today is a beautiful day for roasting. (70 degrees) Tomorrow it is going =
to drop 20 degrees. I need to roast some beans to take home for my =
family to drink for Christmas and the next fews day. Which of the above =
beans would be best to drink on 6-10 days rest?
Thanks for your help in advance!!
Julie

30) From: Tom Ulmer
I would without hesitation recommend any of these in 6-10 days normally
rested. Traveling by air seems to flatten the peak flavors considerably in
my opinion.

31) From: Julie H Tieszen
Thanks Tom! We are driving....VA to Florida. I missed my chance to roast 
today. I'll just have to brave the 50 degree weather tomorrow. :)
Julie

32) From: Vicki Smith
LOL. You have no idea how this sounds to me--a Central Alberta gal who 
has roasted at -20 C/-4 F more than once ;).
vicki
Julie H Tieszen wrote:
<Snip>

33) From: Julie H Tieszen
I figured someone would find that humorous. I was born and raised in FL. I 
have thin blood. But I can tolerate heat and humidity more than most. :)
Julie

34) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
I haven't noticed that, but any roasted beans I've flown with have been vac
bag sealed.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

35) From: Tom Ulmer
Indeed vacuum sealed bags and the willingness to travel with all the coffee
appurtenances would more than likely find success at maintaining the peak
flavors.
Early on in my roasting adventures I tried flying with whole beans, grinder,
and travel press. If you transport the beans in a container unable
effectively deal with the change in pressures it can be counter-productive
to say the least. 
The effort to reward ratio finally brought me around to grinding what I plan
to use in advance and brewing with whatever means I find at the other end.
On a contrary note I will travel with shaving soap when flying instead of a
can of cream, adding a few more items to the bag. It's a delicate balance of
comfort and speed...

36) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
We had a massive cold spell and I roasted in 63 degree weather for the
first time, I actually added a min to the roast time.. Such is the
hardships of winter while roasting coffee!
hehehehe
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf
 "On station and on point 136 and counting down..." 
I figured someone would find that humorous. I was born and raised in FL.
I 
have thin blood. But I can tolerate heat and humidity more than most. :)
Julie

37) From: Rich M
Hi-
I got into the home roasting habit about 6 months ago. While doing my  
research, it seemed that the primary reason to home roast was to be  
able to drink fresh, "just-roasted" coffee.  Now, I'm reading on  
these lists of the need to wait 3,4, even 10 days before drinking my  
stuff.  Is there any rule of thumb as to how long one must wait  
before partaking in ones own brew?  As an aside, what do you folks  
feel is the best way to store roasted beans?  I currently use a  
simple zip-lock for the 3-4 days it takes me to drink what I have  
roasted.  Any better suggestions?  This whole roasting thing is a lot  
of fun, but it sure seems I'm always going two steps forward and one  
step back as far as knowledge goes.  Thanks all.
Rich

38) From: Tom Ulmer
Rich-
Somewhere between the time you roast and the time it goes stale would be
best - usually within 2 weeks - depending on whether you've developed a
technique of keeping the beans in perfect taste stasis. 
There is a point in between where the flavors are most robust. The bean
itself, the method of roasting, and storage are primary contributors to
rest/flavor curve.

39) From: Rich M
Thanks Dennis-
I'll give it a little trial and error.
Rich
ps. 3.5 to 4.5 pounds per week??!!  That can't be all for you, can it?
On Dec 19, 2006, at 7:37 PM, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69) wrote:
<Snip>

40) From: Les
Rich,
If it doesn't taste good the day after roasting, resting isn't going to
change that!  I had some *Nicaragua Cup of Excellence #17 - San Antonio *this
morning on 12 hours rest.  I would have to put it in the top 10 of the
coffees I have had this year.  It is a Cattura and I usually don't like
"cat" coffees unless they are blended with a typica or bourbon.  This is one
nice bold cup of coffee that doesn't have any of the normal "tin" taste that
I often associate with a "Cat."  I am glad Tom is out, or the stash would be
growing.  I always sample my coffees at 12 hours.  The only exception would
be the Pacamara bean.  It is always best after 3 days rest.  Personally, I
enjoy the change in the various coffees as they mature.  I would say that
with proper storage, coffee is fresh for a maximum of 14 days.  Mike
McKoffee did an extensive study a long time ago.  We did enjoy some that was
older than that, but it had been vacuum packed and frozen.   Most coffees
have a sweet spot.  I would never never not enjoy Bugisu the day after
roasting.  To me, that is when it has the most chocolate.  However, I always
enjoy it after the 4th day too because the bean takes on an awesome
complexity that is hard to put into words.  Rich, part of the learning
process is learning the beans.  I roasted some Gesha last night that will be
perfect on Christmas eve for espressos and Cappos because I know that 5-7
days rest is where this bean is at its peak for espresso.  It has also been
roasted to a nice city roast.  I will enjoy a brewed pot of it on Thursday
because brewing method and rest make a difference too.  This is an easy
hobby, but it has many complexities that make it interesting, never boring.
Enjoy the journey and realize that you are getting some of the best coffee
in your area!  I had a newbie roaster send me some of her roast in the
exchange.  To be honest, I was hoping for Bret or Ron or one of the other
experienced roasters.  I was amazed at the great coffee from someone who has
been roasting less than a year.  So don't get discouraged as you see people
pushing the envelope toward perfection!  Enjoy your great coffee and don't
let anyone tell you otherwise.  I have been homeroasting for 22 years and I
am still learning.
Les
On 12/19/06, Rich M  wrote:
<Snip>

41) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-284--732387126
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I fly with my beans in one-way valve bags and have had no pressure  
mishaps.
On Dec 19, 2006, at 7:58 AM, Tom Ulmer wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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I fly with my beans in one-way =
valve bags and have had no pressure mishaps.
On Dec 19, =
2006, at 7:58 AM, Tom Ulmer wrote:

Early on in my roasting = adventures I tried flying with whole beans, grinder,

and travel press. If you = transport the beans in a container unable

effectively deal with the change in = pressures it can be counter-productive

to say the least. 

= Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-284--732387126--

42) From: Les
No Dennis I am an official shill.
Les
On 12/19/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
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43) From: Les
I don't know ask Mike McKoffee, he gave me the title!  I would guess number
two.  It couldn't be number 3, because with Sweet Marias, it is never a
gamble, it is always good coffee!
Les
On 12/19/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
<Snip>
der
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44) From: Rich M
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Hey Les-
Thanks for all the helpful input.  I am nowhere near getting  
discouraged.  In fact, just the opposite.  I'm already drinking  
better coffee than any store-bought stuff, and I can see progress in  
my own roasts.  It's been a hoot.  Do any experienced roasters on  
this site ever sell their roasted coffee?  I know that's kind of  
going against the whole home-roasting thing, but it would be kind of  
cool just to get a benchmark and see how far I have to go.  Thanks  
again.
Rich
On Dec 19, 2006, at 11:50 AM, Les wrote:
<Snip>
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Hey Les-Thanks for all the =
helpful input.  I am nowhere near getting discouraged.  In fact, =
just the opposite.  I'm already drinking better coffee than any =
store-bought stuff, and I can see progress in my own roasts.  It's =
been a hoot.  Do any experienced roasters on this site ever sell their =
roasted coffee?  I know that's kind of going against the whole =
home-roasting thing, but it would be kind of cool just to get a =
benchmark and see how far I have to go.  Thanks again.
Rich = On Dec 19, 2006, at 11:50 AM, Les wrote:
Rich, If it doesn't taste good the day = after roasting, resting isn't going to change that!  I had some Nicaragua Cup of Excellence #17 - = San Antonio this morning on 12 hours rest.  I would have to = put it in the top 10 of the coffees I have had this year.  It is a = Cattura and I usually don't like "cat" coffees unless they are blended = with a typica or bourbon.  This is one nice bold cup of coffee that = doesn't have any of the normal "tin" taste that I often associate with a = "Cat."  I am glad Tom is out, or the stash would be growing.  I = always sample my coffees at 12 hours.  The only exception would be the = Pacamara bean.  It is always best after 3 days rest.  Personally, I = enjoy the change in the various coffees as they mature.  I would say = that with proper storage, coffee is fresh for a maximum of 14 days.  = Mike McKoffee did an extensive study a long time ago.  We did enjoy = some that was older than that, but it had been vacuum packed and = frozen.   Most coffees have a sweet spot.  I would never never not = enjoy Bugisu the day after roasting.  To me, that is when it has the = most chocolate.  However, I always enjoy it after the 4th day too = because the bean takes on an awesome complexity that is hard to put into = words.  Rich, part of the learning process is learning the beans.  I = roasted some Gesha last night that will be perfect on Christmas eve for = espressos and Cappos because I know that 5-7 days rest is where this = bean is at its peak for espresso.  It has also been roasted to a nice = city roast.  I will enjoy a brewed pot of it on Thursday because = brewing method and rest make a difference too.  This is an easy hobby, = but it has many complexities that make it interesting, never boring.  = Enjoy the journey and realize that you are getting some of the best = coffee in your area!  I had a newbie roaster send me some of her roast = in the exchange.  To be honest, I was hoping for Bret or Ron or one of = the other experienced roasters.  I was amazed at the great coffee from = someone who has been roasting less than a year.  So don't get = discouraged as you see people pushing the envelope toward perfection!  = Enjoy your great coffee and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.  I = have been homeroasting for 22 years and I am still learning. =   Les   On 12/19/06, Rich = M <rmatiszik> = wrote: Hi- I = got into the home roasting habit about 6 months ago. While doing = my research, it seemed that the primary reason to home roast was to = be able to drink fresh, "just-roasted" coffee.  Now, I'm reading = on these lists of the need to wait 3,4, even 10 days before drinking = my stuff.  Is there any rule of thumb as to how long one must = wait before partaking in ones own brew?  As an aside, what do = you folks feel is the best way to store roasted beans?  I = currently use a simple zip-lock for the 3-4 days it takes me to drink = what I have roasted.  Any better suggestions?  This whole = roasting thing is a lot of fun, but it sure seems I'm always going = two steps forward and one step back as far as knowledge goes.  Than= ks = all. Rich hom= eroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= --Apple-Mail-3--729209289--

45) From: Justin Marquez
On 12/19/06, Rich M  wrote:
<Snip>
I occasionally have messed up a roast.  When that happens, I always
test brew the roast, just to see what can be learned.  So far, I have
always had a result that was still better than canned coffee from the
store.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

46) From: Brett Mason
HI RIch,
Many on this list sell their coffee...  I do, for roughly $10 a lb.
Many others on this list have spent countless hours trying to dissuade
people from selling their coffee, primarily in the name of sustainable
business.
But virtually all on this list love their coffee!
Brett
On 12/19/06, Rich M  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

47) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Rich,
	It really depends on the coffee.  Some like the Moka Kadir blend
are good after 12-24 hours and some like the Misty Valley that require
3-4 days for the fruit to develop. Try your coffees at 1 day and testing
daily until you run out and find the sweet spot for what you are
roasting and your palette some people enjoy the same coffee at 3 days
while others will tell you same coffee same roast 5 is the minimum I
roast at least once a week and Most of the coffees are great after 2-3
days and are good until I run out at the 6-7 day mark. Roasting about
3.5-4.5 pounds per week keeps me going but there are some days when I go
coffee free(I go with out rather than drink "navy Coffee") due to a
shortage. 
	As for the two steps forward and one step back.  I know how you
feel but remember we have the greatest wealth of home roasting right
here combine that with the best beans, that make a great recipe for
success. The curve may seem steep but the more you know the more you
will learn my first 3 months of lurking on this list I had no idea about
what most of the conversation was about. Now I know enough to understand
how much I don't know.  Home roasting can be as simple as (quoting a
list member) heat+Beans all the rest is commentary to as complex as
surfing tempos in a high end espresso machine to roast profiling to a
tenth of a degree. The real question is how obsessed are you and how
obsessed are you willing to be? The wonderful thing about home roasting
is you can get started for less than $50.00 (popper plus a sampler pack
and a French press-that is how I started) and from the very beginning
you will already be better than 95% of what you could buy commercially
and that is only if you can find a local fresh roaster that doesn't over
roast as a course of habit.
	To answer your storage question I use the one way valve bags out
to sea and vacuum containers at home. Personal prefrence some people on
here will tell you that the kraft bags with the lining are fine for
storage. Zip Lock should be fine for you needs presently. 
IMO hope some of this helps!
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf
 "On station and on point 136 and counting down..." 
Hi-
I got into the home roasting habit about 6 months ago. While doing my  
research, it seemed that the primary reason to home roast was to be  
able to drink fresh, "just-roasted" coffee.  Now, I'm reading on  
these lists of the need to wait 3,4, even 10 days before drinking my  
stuff.  Is there any rule of thumb as to how long one must wait  
before partaking in ones own brew?  As an aside, what do you folks  
feel is the best way to store roasted beans?  I currently use a  
simple zip-lock for the 3-4 days it takes me to drink what I have  
roasted.  Any better suggestions?  This whole roasting thing is a lot  
of fun, but it sure seems I'm always going two steps forward and one  
step back as far as knowledge goes.  Thanks all.
Rich

48) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hey Rich in case you hadn't noticed Les is one of our other
newbies...LOL  
 
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
CS/CS-5 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf 
 "On station and on point 135 and counting down..."

49) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
No it is not all for me I make about 3-4 12 cup pots per day for the
watch.
I get the first cup from each pot then it is a giant free for all (then
I feel bad because someone always gets left out so I will make another
pot)
Some people have actually started giving donations to help with my next
Harvey order 
Appreciation is great....
Changing navy coffee one sailor at a time!
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf
 "On station and on point 135 and counting down..." 
Rich
ps. 3.5 to 4.5 pounds per week??!!  That can't be all for you, can it?

50) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
shill   Slang. 
-noun 
1.	 a person who poses as a customer in order to decoy others into
participating, as at a gambling house, auction, confidence game, etc. 	
2.	 a person who publicizes or praises something or someone for
reasons of self-interest, personal profit, or friendship or loyalty. 	
-verb (used without object) 
3.	 to work as a shill: He shills for a large casino. 	
-verb (used with object) 
4.	 to advertise or promote (a product) as or in the manner of a
huckster; hustle: He was hired to shill a new TV show. 	
 
 
And Which defination would you fit under?
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
CS/CS-5 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf 
 "On station and on point 135 and counting down..." 
No Dennis I am an official shill.
 
Les
 
On 12/19/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote: 
	Hey Rich in case you hadn't noticed Les is one of our other
newbies...LOL  
	 
	
	Dennis 
	AKA 
	FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
	CS/CS-5 
	USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
	FPO AE 09532-2830 
	HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf 
	 "On station and on point 135 and counting down..." 
	 

51) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yes #2, under friendship & loyalty.
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Les
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2006 11:20 AM
I don't know ask Mike McKoffee, he gave me the title!  I would guess number
two.  It couldn't be number 3, because with Sweet Marias, it is never a
gamble, it is always good coffee!
 
Les
On 12/19/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote: 
shill   Slang. 
-noun 
1.	 a person who poses as a customer in order to decoy others into
participating, as at a gambling house, auction, confidence game, etc. 	
2.	 a person who publicizes or praises something or someone for reasons
of self-interest, personal profit, or friendship or loyalty. 	
-verb (used without object) 
3.	 to work as a shill: He shills for a large casino. 	
-verb (used with object) 
4.	 to advertise or promote (a product) as or in the manner of a
huckster; hustle: He was hired to shill a new TV show. 	
 
And Which defination would you fit under?
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
CS/CS-5 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf 
 "On station and on point 135 and counting down." 
No Dennis I am an official shill.
 
Les

52) From: LInda Reese
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
And that would also describe the majority of people on this list.

53) From: Brett Mason
Cold Scale in Iowa
60 above zero:
Arizonians turn on the heat.
People in Iowa plant gardens.
50 above zero:
Californians shiver uncontrollably.
People in Cedar Rapids sunbathe.
40 above zero:
Italian & English cars won't start.
People in Iowa drive with the windows down.
32 above zero:
Distilled water freezes.
The water in Des Moines gets thicker.
20 above zero:
Floridians don coats, thermal underwear, gloves, wool hats.
People in Iowa throw on a flannel shirt.
15 above zero:
New York landlords finally turn up the heat.
People in Iowa have the last cookout before it gets cold.
0
People in Miami all die.
People in Iowa close the windows.
10 below zero:
Californians fly away to Mexico.
People in Iowa get out their winter coats.
25 below zero:
Hollywood disintegrates.
The Girl Scouts in Iowa are selling cookies door to door. (True!)
40 below zero:
Washington DC runs out of hot air.
People in Iowa let the dogs sleep indoors.
100 below zero:
Santa Claus abandons the North Pole.
People in Iowa get upset because they can't start the Mini-Van.
460 below zero:
ALL atomic motion stops (absolute zero on the Kelvin scale.)
People in Iowa start saying..."Cold 'nuff fer ya?"
500 below zero:
Hell freezes over.
On 12/19/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

54) From: Eddie Dove
That was really good ... I enjoyed that!
Eddie
On 2/16/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

55) From: Sandra Andina
--Apple-Mail-46-76680486
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Ever hear the old folk song, "The Frozen Logger?" It's in Alan  
Lomax's "Great American Songbook." The protagonist buttons up his  
shirt at 100 degrees below zero; he also stirs his coffee with his  
thumb.
On Feb 16, 2007, at 2:04 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Sandra Andina
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-46-76680486
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Ever hear the old folk song, =
"The Frozen Logger?" It's in Alan Lomax's "Great American Songbook." The =
protagonist buttons up his shirt at 100 degrees below zero; he also =
stirs his coffee with his thumb.
On Feb 16, 2007, at 2:04 =
PM, Brett Mason wrote:
Cold Scale in Iowa

60 above zero:

Arizonians turn on the heat.

People in Iowa plant gardens.

 

50 above zero:

Californians shiver uncontrollably.

People in Cedar Rapids = sunbathe.

 

40 above zero:

Italian & English cars won't start.

People in Iowa drive with the windows = down.

 

32 above zero:

Distilled water freezes.

The water in Des Moines gets thicker.

 

20 above zero:

Floridians don coats, thermal underwear, gloves, wool hats. =

People in Iowa throw on a = flannel shirt.

 

15 above zero:

New= York landlords finally turn up the heat.

People in Iowa have the last cookout before it = gets cold.

 

0

People in = Miami all die.

People in = Iowa close the windows.

 

10 below zero:

Californians fly away to Mexico.

People in Iowa get out their winter coats. =

 

25 below zero:

Hollywood disintegrates.

The Girl Scouts in Iowa are selling cookies door to door. = (True!)

 

40 below zero:

Washington DC runs out of hot air.

People in Iowa let the dogs sleep indoors. =

 

100 below zero:

Santa Claus abandons the North = Pole.

People in Iowa get = upset because they can't start the Mini-Van.

 

460 below zero:

ALL atomic motion stops (absolute zero on the Kelvin scale.) =

People in Iowa start = saying..."Cold 'nuff fer ya?"

 

500 below zero:

Hell freezes over.

On 12/19/06, Sandy = Andina <sandraandina> = wrote: I fly with my beans in one-way valve bags and = have had no pressure mishaps. On Dec 19, = 2006, at 7:58 AM, Tom Ulmer wrote: Early on in my roasting adventures I tried = flying with whole beans, grinder, and travel press. If you transport the beans in a container = unable effectively deal = with the change in pressures it can be = counter-productive to say the least.  = Sandy = www.sandyandina.comwww.sass-music.com
-- Cheers, Brett http://homeroast.freeservers.com= Sandra = Andinawww.sandyandina.com

= = --Apple-Mail-46-76680486--

56) From: Frank Parth
Puts me in mind of Robert Service's poem The Ballad of Sam Magee.
Frank
<Snip>

57) From: Bruess, Don
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have read so many posts on the resting time and the importance. I know
the resting time is valid since I am a doubting soul have tried coffees
with and without rest. (boy big change) 
However I am also a very impatient person and always look for quicker
methods. Since the resting period as I understand allows the escape of
gas from inside the bean, could that be expedited by drawing a vacuum on
the beans forcing the gaseous out of the beans in a much short period or
is the fact the slow escape of the gas is what increase the quality of
the coffee?
 
Thanks,
 
Don
 
 
 

58) From: miKe mcKoffee
I don't believe vac sealing post roast speeds degassing or the rest process.
In fact I believe it may somewhat slow the rest progression.
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bruess, Don
	Sent: Monday, April 02, 2007 7:35 AM
	I have read so many posts on the resting time and the importance. I
know the resting time is valid since I am a doubting soul have tried coffees
with and without rest. (boy big change) 
	However I am also a very impatient person and always look for
quicker methods. Since the resting period as I understand allows the escape
of gas from inside the bean, could that be expedited by drawing a vacuum on
the beans forcing the gaseous out of the beans in a much short period or is
the fact the slow escape of the gas is what increase the quality of the
coffee?
	Thanks,
	Don

59) From: Eddie Dove
This you cannot and should not rush.  With the application of heat,
you have set into motion a wondrous chain of events that occur on a
molecular level and there is much work to be done in there.  The
diminutive workers will execute their task perfectly, but it must be
done right and take the time it takes.  Consider the release of CO2 to
be the sweat from their brow.
Ditto on what Mike said.
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/2/07, Bruess, Don  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/2/07, Bruess, Don  wrote:
<Snip>

60) From: Larry Johnson
Elegantly put, Mr. Dove.
On 4/2/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

61) From: Justin Marquez
On 4/2/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
Mike - I wonder why? You would think a vacuum would suck the gases
right out of that coffee.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

62) From: Eddie Dove
See ... chew the beans right out of the roaster ...
Thanks Larry!
Eddie
On 4/2/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Docendo Discimus
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

63) From: miKe mcKoffee
I read about the why of vac'ing not causing increased CO2 loss some time ago
but don't rightly recall the technical details. IIRC basically the roasted
coffee cell walls aren't really affected by the vac and the little beanie
CO2 release workers just do their thing at their own pace.
miKe
<Snip>

64) From: Brett Mason
That, my friend, would be a sucker punch...
Brett
On 4/2/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

65) From: Jeff Oien
Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>
I'm no scientist, but I don't see how gases could be sucked out of coffee.
JeffO

66) From: Floyd Lozano
i guess the idea would be that the pressure differential would drive them
out (pull them out really) since vacuum really likes to be filled.  It's the
way of the universe.  A better mechanism would be to find something that
really really really likes to bind CO2 but doesn't affect anything else in
coffee, and expose the coffee to that to suck the CO2 out.  BUT, the problem
is I don't really know what's making the CO2.  As has been stated, more
eloquently than i will bother to try stating, many miraculous things
(barring knowledge, science and magic are indistinguishable, right?) which
make coffee taste pretty damn good and which, as it turns out, produce CO2.
So it's not like the CO2 is necessarily just sitting there looking for the
Out door.  It comes out in it's own good time!
-F
On 4/3/07, Jeff Oien  wrote:
<Snip>

67) From: Larry Williams
It seems that the longer I roast the less I know.  A co-worker from 
Nicaragua gave me three pounds from her country.  I roasted three small 
batches and let them rest for a few days.  One batch was much like other 
central American coffees I had tasted - on the chocolate side with a 
slight fruit.  I roasted this batch and finished it off.  Another batch 
was an off white bean that I soon learned was Monsooned - a fruity 
flavor - very different but drinkable.  The third batch roasted to 
different shades indicating a blend.  The result was a brew that I could 
not drink - kind of a sour fruit  - I had to pour it out.  Yuk!
One month later I brewed some of the monsooned beans.  I has matured 
into a fine cup.  More chocolate and fruit.  I brewed a pot of the 
blended beans this morning and they are wonderful.  The fruit flavors 
now have mellowed to a nice brew.  Not a hint a chocolate - just sweet 
fruit.  Wow!
I  thought the resting period would be much less than a month. How much 
longer can it go?  How long have you rested with success?  It seems like 
we all can't wait to grind those beans to taste that cup.
Larry
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition. 
Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.14.4/1055 - Release Date: 10/7/2007 10:24 AM

68) From: RK
I find that 48 to 96 hours, lighter roast longer then darker roast, and
espresso as much as 9 days.
RK

69) From: Aaron
The general consensus is that coffee should be drank within a week, or 
two at most for it's optimum freshness with 3 to 4 days being the 'magic 
zone'... some say...
Then there are coffee's like Kona's where I find that resting about 10 
days will bring out their best.   Again it all depends on how you 
roasted them etc etc.
These are not really rules or carved in stone, and as you have found 
out, that coffee, defines it's own peak flavor time somewhat longer.  
Ive literally poured coffee from the roaster directly into the grinder 
and made a cup.  I have had some for several weeks.  It won't really be 
a 'bad' cup of coffee if it gets 'seasoned' a little bit... just that 
the flavors might change a bit.
\
Aaron

70) From: Les
This is bean dependant too.  You will only know by tasting through the
rest period.
Les
On 10/7/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

71) From: Michael Wade
I've had a similar experience with Idido Misty Valley.  Not long ago I 
bought my first drum roaster, one of Jeffrey Pawlan's CCR's.   I had been 
experimenting with unconventional profiles in an attempt to maximise the 
fruited qualities I had enjoyed with air roasters and had a small quantity 
still sitting around over a month later.  Searching for something a house 
full of teenage neices might like,  I took a chance and brewed it up.  I 
was astonished when everyone was wildly enthusiastic about the strong 
blueberry taste!
Recently another experiment ended badly, leaving me with a barely-cinnamon 
roast of (last year's) MV that smells intensely of apricots.  It doesn't 
brew that well, has a harsh midrange, but very sweet.
The more I try to refine my ability, the more I become convinced I haven't 
learned a damn thing...
Michael Wade

72) From: RK
One in the same RK AKA ron kyle

73) From: Jeff Bensen
At 03:47 PM 10/7/2007, Larry Williams wrote:
<Snip>
Larry -
The longest I've rested a bean is around two weeks. In general, it 
seems like my lighter roasts fare better over a longer rest versus my 
darker ones.
A case in point is last year's IMV. At one point I roasted up over a 
pound of it to C+ and drank it from right out of the roaster through 
11 days post-roast (all in a vac pot). My notes indicated that it 
started getting really good at the 5 day mark, peaked at around 7 
days, and lost a little of it's nuances during days 9-11. It was 
still drinkable to the end, just not quite as good.
Most of my darker roasts (FC, FC+) seem to peak earlier and not keep as long.
I usually only keep coffee for two weeks when I roasted up too much 
at once. In almost all cases the cup quality suffered near the end of 
that time, with a few of the Konas being an exception. As Aaron 
mentioned, some of these actually benefit from a week or so of rest.
Side note: I keep my roasted beans in small mason jars (pint or 
half-pint), as full as I can get them to minimize air space. Once I 
open one of these jars, I will usually use it until it is gone before 
opening a different jar. That seems to help them maintain their 
flavor over time.
- Jeff Bensen
   Palm Bay, FL

74) From: Cory Creighton
I am currently roasting a Yemen coffee that needs resting before drinking.
It is recommended to let the coffee rest for at least 48 hours before
trying.  While letting the coffee rest, should I leave it sealed in the jar
or let fresh air in, or does it even matter?
Best regards,
Cory
--
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

75) From: Jim Wilson
I am currently roasting a Yemen coffee that needs resting before drinking.
It is recommended to let the coffee rest for at least 48 hours before
trying.  While letting the coffee rest, should I leave it sealed in the jar
or let fresh air in, or does it even matter?
Best regards,
Cory
~~~You can cap the jar loosely to let intial gas escape but seal the jar after a few days by turning the lid til it stops.  Air is the enemy of coffee beans
I like and use the one way valve bags to store my roasted coffee.  Others may have better and different ideas
Jake
Reddick Fla.
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76) From: Cory Creighton
Thank you, Jake.
I have been roasting about two years and just joined the list yesterday and
looking forward to the information.  I have always sealed my beans after
cooling and not opening again until I'm ready to brew.
Always let initial gas out after roasting?
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 3:48 PM, Jim Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cory Creighton
LegalFish, LLC
P: 312.239.8670
F: 312 329 0930
cory.creighton
www.legalfish.com
Homeroast mailing list
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77) From: Lynne
Cory -
We discussed this awhile ago, and someone (forgot who - blame it on
part-timers)
actually experimented - left some roasted beans in a bowl, and another
portion in a
mason jar (I use mason jars).
He said the ones in the bowl (if I remember correctly) tasted fresher! I
haven't been
able to try it - I made the mistake of telling my son, but he insisted I
continue doing
the same (I put them in a mason jar, but loosen the top for the first
night).
Guess he figures if it ain't broke.... and he loves my homeroast.
Lynne
(if you try leaving it open - let us know how it turns out)
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 4:48 PM, Jim Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>
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78) From: Carol Lugg
QWN0dWFsbHksIHNpbmNlIHRoYXQgZGlzY3Vzc2lvbiwgSSBoYXZlIGJlZW4gbGVhdmluZyBteSBi
ZWFucyBvdXQgaW4gYSBib3dsIApmb3Igc2V2ZXJhbCBob3VycywgdGhlbiBJIHB1dCB0aGVtIGlu
IGEgbWFzb24gamFyLCBhbmQgY2xvc2UgaXQgdGlnaHQuICBNeSAKcGVyc29uYWwgb3BpbmlvbiBp
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ZXhwZXJpbWVudGVkIC0gbGVmdCBzb21lIHJvYXN0ZWQgYmVhbnMgaW4gYSBib3dsLCBhbmQgYW5v
dGhlcgo+IHBvcnRpb24gaW4gYQo+IG1hc29uIGphciAoSSB1c2UgbWFzb24gamFycykuCj4KPiBI
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dGVkIGZyZXNoZXIhIEkKPiBoYXZlbid0IGJlZW4KPiBhYmxlIHRvIHRyeSBpdCAtIEkgbWFkZSB0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79) From: Cory Creighton
Lynne,
Thanks for the input!  Use mason jars as well.  Think I will roast a batch
and seal while it rests and do a batch unsealed.  Get five cups per roast so
I won't be out too much coffee if I don't like (although I highly doubt it).
Love the home roast and all the wonderful things that go along with it!
Cory
Chicago
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 4:25 PM, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cory Creighton
LegalFish, LLC
P: 312.239.8670
F: 312 329 0930
cory.creighton
www.legalfish.com
Homeroast mailing list
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80) From: John Mac
Cory,
I let all my coffee rest at least two days before brewing, it taste better
to me, so that's what I do. I roast 1/2 pound batches in my Behmor and
between me and the wife, the coffee never lasts more than a few days. I
store my beans in 1/2 lb. paper coffee bags, the kind with the window in it.
I think storage methods matter when you are storing roasted beans for
extended periods, but the whole point in home roasting is to have fresh
beans to brew with, so don't worry about.
Cheers,
John in Nor Cal
On 12/1/08, Jim Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>
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81) From: John A C Despres
Hi, Cory. I find it doesn't matter. But resting a Yemen coffee for
only 48 hours is too short. I typically rest Yemens for a week.
Best,
John
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 12:50 PM, Cory Creighton  wrote:
<Snip>
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82) From: Cory Creighton
John,
I have recently found that the longer the Yemen rests the better it is.  I
usually get too anxious in letting the coffee rest because I want to try
it.  Guess I will have to practice a little better discipline and start
roasting for future batches so it can rest rather than roasting only for
what my wife and I drink.
Cheers,
Cory
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 8:15 PM, John A C Despres wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cory Creighton
LegalFish, LLC
P: 312.239.8670
F: 312 329 0930
cory.creighton
www.legalfish.com
Homeroast mailing list
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83) From: Brian Kamnetz
Cory,
The main thing I've heard on this topic is that it is not good to seal
the coffee immediately after roasting because is seems to blunt the
flavors. Ed (I think it was) says that his taste tests haven't shown
any difference between leaving the roasted beans in an open bowl vs.
sealing them in a jar, as long as they are consumed in 10 days or so.
Personally, after roasting I put the coffee beans into a glass jar and
leave it open for a day, then just set the lid on, without tightening,
for a couple days after that. Then I start closing the lid. I don't
have a good reason for doing it this way, other than wanting to avoid
sealing the beans immediately after roasting.
Brian
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 5:20 PM, Cory Creighton  wrote:
<Snip>
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84) From: Terry
After I roast and cool my beans, I put them in a glass jar.  My wife does a lot of canning, and I took one of her seals and put a small nail hole for gas to escape.  I secure the seal with the metal ring.  It is my theory that this allows the gas to escape and keeps air out of the jar.  At least it made sense when the thought came to me.  After a day or so, I use a regular lid.
-Terry
From: Brian Kamnetz 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 9:57:35 AM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
Cory,
The main thing I've heard on this topic is that it is not good to seal
the coffee immediately after roasting because is seems to blunt the
flavors. Ed (I think it was) says that his taste tests haven't shown
any difference between leaving the roasted beans in an open bowl vs.
sealing them in a jar, as long as they are consumed in 10 days or so.
Personally, after roasting I put the coffee beans into a glass jar and
leave it open for a day, then just set the lid on, without tightening,
for a couple days after that. Then I start closing the lid. I don't
have a good reason for doing it this way, other than wanting to avoid
sealing the beans immediately after roasting.
Brian
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 5:20 PM, Cory Creighton  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
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85) From: Jim Wilson
Thank you, Jake.
I have been roasting about two years and just joined the list yesterday and
looking forward to the information.  I have always sealed my beans after
cooling and not opening again until I'm ready to brew.
Always let initial gas out after roasting?
~~~~You have more experience roasting than I have Cory.  I started raosting in the late spring, early summer of this year.  The empirical info I gleaned from the beginning is to let the gas escape right after roasting, so if you store in a jar, leave the cap loose for a few days so the high initial portions of gas is allowed to vent.  
Personally, and this is only my opinion, the harm done by not allowing the gas to escape would be the possibility of an explosion of the vessel (glass jar) you store the non vented beans in.  From day one I have been keeping my roasted beans in plastic 1 lb roasted bags made specifically to store roasted coffee in, with a one way valve so the beans can de-gas throughout their entire life, which for me is usually no more than a week if that long.
I roast 12 ounces at a time which nets me 10 ounces.  Typically I go through 10 ounces of roasted coffee in 3-4 days so, nothing roasted sits around to go stale.  All of my roasted coffee lives in the one way valve bags so they are allowed to de-gas from the moment they're out of the roaster until the last bean is ground, but I have sometimes used canning jars to store fresh roasted beans in and when I do, the lid is screwed on til it seats, then I back it off a smidge.  This allows the gas to vent.  After two days I completely seal the lid by tightening fully.  Sometimes after closing the lid and opening it the next day, I'll hear a little bit of gas escape.  That build up IMO has not affected the flavor of my beans nor has it dangerously climbed to the point of exploding the glass jar.
Something else to think about when opening a glass jar of beans that were not allowed to vent, there is the danger of chaff, an errant bean perhaps?, blowing into your eyes.  I'm going to guess this hasn't happened to you probably because you keep the jar at a respectable distance from your eyes when opening.
Jake
Reddick Fla.
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86) From: Cory Creighton
Good to know about the bags.  I think I will give them a try.
Immediately when I'm done roasting a batch I always put the beans in a mesh
colander and  proceed to shake the beans until they are at room temp.  Do
this for two reasons, one obliviously to cool and also to remove any
additional chaff that may remain on the beans, thus preventing any problems
when initially opening the jar.  Is this a normal method that I'm using or
am I wasting time and effort cooling in the colander?  Do you do anything to
cool the beans or do you let them cool naturally in a bowl or something?  I
was paranoid to keep my precious beans uncovered as I thought they would
lose flavor or aroma.  Good to know about letting the gas out.
Roast On!
Cory
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 4:55 PM, Jim Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cory Creighton
LegalFish, LLC
P: 312.239.8670
F: 312 329 0930
cory.creighton
www.legalfish.com
Homeroast mailing list
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87) From: Paul Helbert
Cory,
I subscribe to the "try it and see what you like" school. I suggest you
roast enough to be able to try it every day of so from hour zero. Try it
right out of the roaster. Then make your own notes as to what you like best.
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 12:44 PM, Cory Creighton wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Paul Helbert
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
-Laurence J. Peter, educator and author (1919-1990)
Homeroast mailing list
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88) From: John A C Despres
The way I handle this is to have at least half dozen roasts in
cupboard at a time, often more. That way I'm not required to drink the
only batch available. They tend to last for longer rest periods this
way. When I get to the bottom of a jar, usually less than a pot's
worth, I play with blending.
John
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 9:09 PM, Paul Helbert  wrote:
<Snip>
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89) From: Jim Gundlach
Cory,
      That is my school too.  Just part of the home roasting experience.
           pecan jim
On Dec 2, 2008, at 8:09 PM, Paul Helbert wrote:
<Snip>
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90) From: Brian Kamnetz
I agree.... I initially thought there was one "right" way, and it took
me a while to get out of that mindset. I finally accepted that I will
be learning about roasting and coffee throughout my life. Rome wasn't
built in a day, etc.
Brian
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 9:41 PM, Jim Gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
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91) From: Ed Needham
What I observed was that beans that were sealed tended to get that rancid 
smell/taste which made the beans significantly less enjoyable after a couple 
weeks.  Beans left in the open did not get the rancid taste/smell but lost 
flavor and aroma.
Personally, I solve both problems by consuming what I roast within a week. 
I have never found a reason to rest coffee.  I like the greater intensity of 
flavor that comes with beans freshly roasted.  Some tend to favor those with 
a more muted profile and might find benefit in 'resting' the beans.
The bulk of the coffee flavors are pretty durable and remain flavorful for a 
couple of weeks, but the very volatile and elusive, delicate flavors I crave 
go away in a day or two.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

92) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks for clearing that up, Ed. Sorry to be off a bit in my recollection.
Brian
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 11:54 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
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93) From: Brian Kamnetz
Actually, as is often pointed out, all who are interested can do some
very simple experiments, such as you did, to find out what processes
produce the best (to them) flavors in the cup.
Brian
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 11:54 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
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94) From: Royalcoffeedubai Fzco
Dear Terry
Try www.tightpac.com
They are perfect vacuum container for cofee
Sam =
From: Terry 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 10:24:13 PM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
After I roast and cool my beans, I put them in a glass jar.  My wife does=
 a lot of canning, and I took one of her seals and put a small nail hole fo=
r gas to escape.  I secure the seal with the metal ring.  It is my theo=
ry that this allows the gas to escape and keeps air out of the jar.  At l=
east it made sense when the thought came to me.  After a day or so, I use=
 a regular lid.
-Terry
From: Brian Kamnetz 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 9:57:35 AM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
Cory,
The main thing I've heard on this topic is that it is not good to seal
the coffee immediately after roasting because is seems to blunt the
flavors. Ed (I think it was) says that his taste tests haven't shown
any difference between leaving the roasted beans in an open bowl vs.
sealing them in a jar, as long as they are consumed in 10 days or so.
Personally, after roasting I put the coffee beans into a glass jar and
leave it open for a day, then just set the lid on, without tightening,
for a couple days after that. Then I start closing the lid. I don't
have a good reason for doing it this way, other than wanting to avoid
sealing the beans immediately after roasting.
Brian
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 5:20 PM, Cory Creighton  wr=
ote:
<Snip>
nd
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
      =
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
      =
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820

95) From: Royalcoffeedubai Fzco
Try www.tightpac.com containers, they are perfect vacuum containers for cof=
fee
Sam
From: Brian Kamnetz 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 7:57:35 PM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
Cory,
The main thing I've heard on this topic is that it is not good to seal
the coffee immediately after roasting because is seems to blunt the
flavors. Ed (I think it was) says that his taste tests haven't shown
any difference between leaving the roasted beans in an open bowl vs.
sealing them in a jar, as long as they are consumed in 10 days or so.
Personally, after roasting I put the coffee beans into a glass jar and
leave it open for a day, then just set the lid on, without tightening,
for a couple days after that. Then I start closing the lid. I don't
have a good reason for doing it this way, other than wanting to avoid
sealing the beans immediately after roasting.
Brian
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 5:20 PM, Cory Creighton  wr=
ote:
<Snip>
nd
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
      =
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820

96) From: Royalcoffeedubai Fzco
Try www.tightpac.com vacuum containers, they are perfect for coffee
Sam
From: John Mac 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 2:25:20 AM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
Cory,
I let all my coffee rest at least two days before brewing, it taste better
to me, so that's what I do. I roast 1/2 pound batches in my Behmor and
between me and the wife, the coffee never lasts more than a few days.. I
store my beans in 1/2 lb. paper coffee bags, the kind with the window in it.
I think storage methods matter when you are storing roasted beans for
extended periods, but the whole point in home roasting is to have fresh
beans to brew with, so don't worry about.
Cheers,
John in Nor Cal
On 12/1/08, Jim Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>
 jar
<Snip>
rs
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main..php?g2_itemId=7820
      =
Homeroast mailing list
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97) From: Royalcoffeedubai Fzco
Try www.tightpac.com vacuum containers, they are perfect for coffee
Sam
From: Cory Creighton 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 2:21:39 AM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
Lynne,
Thanks for the input!  Use mason jars as well.  Think I will roast a ba=
tch
and seal while it rests and do a batch unsealed.  Get five cups per roast=
 so
I won't be out too much coffee if I don't like (although I highly doubt it).
Love the home roast and all the wonderful things that go along with it!
Cory
Chicago
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 4:25 PM, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
he
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
-- =
Cory Creighton
LegalFish, LLC
P: 312.239.8670
F: 312 329 0930
cory.creighton
www.legalfish.com
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98) From: Royalcoffeedubai Fzco
VHJ5IHd3dy50aWdodHBhYy5jb20gdmFjdXVtIGNvbnRhaW5lcnMsIHRoZXkgYXJlIHBlcmZlY3Qg
Zm9yIGNvZmZlZQpTYW0KCgoKCgpfX19fX19fX19fX19fX19fX19fX19fX19fX19fX19fXwpGcm9t
OiBDYXJvbCBMdWdnIDxoZWlzbG9yZEBwcmFpcmllbmV0d29ya3MuY29tPgpUbzogaG9tZXJvYXN0
QGxpc3RzLnN3ZWV0bWFyaWFzY29mZmVlLmNvbQpTZW50OiBUdWVzZGF5LCBEZWNlbWJlciAyLCAy
MDA4IDE6MTE6MTMgQU0KU3ViamVjdDogUmU6IFtIb21lcm9hc3RdIFJlc3RpbmcgVGltZQoKQWN0
dWFsbHksIHNpbmNlIHRoYXQgZGlzY3Vzc2lvbiwgSSBoYXZlIGJlZW4gbGVhdmluZyBteSBiZWFu
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bWFzb24gamFyLCBhbmQgY2xvc2UgaXQgdGlnaHQuoCBNeSAKcGVyc29uYWwgb3BpbmlvbiBpcyB0
aGF0IGl0IHRhc3RlcyBiZXR0ZXIgdGhpcyB3YXkuoCBNYXliZSBpdCBpcyBvbmUgb2YgdGhvc2Ug
CnRoaW5ncyB0aGF0IGV2ZXJ5b25lIGhhcyB0aGVpciBvd24gd2F5LCBhbmQgdGhlcmUgaXMgbm8g
cmlnaHQgb3Igd3JvbmcuCi0tLS0KQmxlc3NpbmdzLApDYXJvbAoKIlRoZXJlIGlzIG5vIHBpdCBz
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CkJvb20KCk9uIE1vbmRheSAwMSBEZWNlbWJlciAyMDA4IDAzOjI1OjI4IHBtIEx5bm5lIHdyb3Rl
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KGZvcmdvdCB3aG8gLSBibGFtZSBpdCBvbgo+IHBhcnQtdGltZXJzKQo+IGFjdHVhbGx5IGV4cGVy
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cmVzaGVyISBJCj4gaGF2ZW4ndCBiZWVuCj4gYWJsZSB0byB0cnkgaXQgLSBJIG1hZGUgdGhlIG1p
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c3QgbWFpbGluZyBsaXN0CkhvbWVyb2FzdEBsaXN0cy5zd2VldG1hcmlhc2NvZmZlZS5jb20KaHR0
cDovL2xpc3RzLnN3ZWV0bWFyaWFzY29mZmVlLmNvbS9saXN0aW5mby5jZ2kvaG9tZXJvYXN0LXN3
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X19fX19fX19fX19fX19fX18KSG9tZXJvYXN0IG1haWxpbmcgbGlzdApIb21lcm9hc3RAbGlzdHMu
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bGlzdGluZm8uY2dpL2hvbWVyb2FzdC1zd2VldG1hcmlhc2NvZmZlZS5jb20KSG9tZXJvYXN0IGNv
bW11bml0eSBwaWN0dXJlcyAtdXBsb2FkIHlvdXJzISkgOiBodHRwOi8vd3d3LnN3ZWV0bWFyaWFz
Y29mZmVlLmNvbS9nYWxsZXJ5L21haW4ucGhwP2cyX2l0ZW1JZD03ODIw

99) From: Brian Kamnetz
Cory,
I cut a hole just a bit smaller than my colander in the end of a
cardboard box. I sent the box on end, hole up, next to a box fan. When
my roast is done, I set the colander into the hole and turn the fan
on. In cooler weather I blow up through the beans, which I like
because it blows all the chaf out. In wamer weather I suck air through
the beans because it cools much more effectively that way.
Brian
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 9:04 PM, Cory Creighton  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
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100) From: Paul Whitener Jr.
I've found that dry-processed coffees benefit most from several days  =
of resting (3-5). I recently roasted some of the El Salvador Santa  =
Rita Full Natural in my Behmor. After 18 hours rest, the cup was  =
watery and uninspiring (brewed in my french press); I was very  =
disappointed. A few days later I repeated the brewing process, and  =
the cup had definitely matured; it had the richness and dark  =
chocolate characteristics I was hoping for. As I'm quite robotic  =
about my brewing, I can only assume that the dramatic difference in  =
taste was due to the rest time.
I find the "rustic" characteristics of many dry-processed coffees  =
(such as Ethiopians) to be a bit overwhelming for the first few days.  =
The "wild" aromas/flavors fall back a bit after a few day's rest,  =
which is more to my liking. When I contact SM about this, Derek  =
recommended "making sure you are resting ("rustic" dry-processed)  =
coffee for maybe 4-7 days."
Lighter roasts (City, City+) also benefit from a bit more rest, more  =
like two days. From the "Sweet Maria's Roasted" blog:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
I try to keep a variety of beans in the pantry (stored in glass  =
canning jars as others have suggested) so I can allow for proper  =
resting times. It can be tough to wait, but after my experience with  =
the El Salvador Full Natural I'm willing to be patient.
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101) From: Mark McBrearty
Hello,
Just a list lurker here... but I thought I'd share this cooling  
technique I stumbled onto. It works wonderfully if the vent hood on  
your stove is powerful enough.
I use a poppery, which I roast on the stove so the vent hood can pull  
out any smoke. I found that I then just dump the beans into an  
aluminum colander, switch the vent hood to high (mine has a really  
high setting, 'B', which I think must mean 'blow it out your chimney')  
and I place the colander against the vent hood screen. The fan suction  
holds the colander in place all by itself, and pulling air through the  
aluminum has the beans completely cooled in less than a minute,  
probably closer to 30 seconds. Any leftover chaff is then caught in  
the vent hood filter, which simply rinses off in the sink.
Just make sure no one comes along and turns down the vent hood when  
you have your back turned. It's amazing how far those beans can travel  
when they are bouncing off the stove top... :-)
-Mark McB
On Dec 3, 2008, at 12:00 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
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102) From: Royalcoffeedubai Fzco
Try www.tightpac.com
good vacuum containers for coffee =
Sam
From: Cory Creighton 
To: homeroast
Sent: Wednesday, December 3, 2008 6:04:50 AM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
Good to know about the bags.  I think I will give them a try.
Immediately when I'm done roasting a batch I always put the beans in a mesh
colander and  proceed to shake the beans until they are at room temp.  =
Do
this for two reasons, one obliviously to cool and also to remove any
additional chaff that may remain on the beans, thus preventing any problems
when initially opening the jar.  Is this a normal method that I'm using or
am I wasting time and effort cooling in the colander?  Do you do anything=
 to
cool the beans or do you let them cool naturally in a bowl or something? =
 I
was paranoid to keep my precious beans uncovered as I thought they would
lose flavor or aroma.  Good to know about letting the gas out.
Roast On!
Cory
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 4:55 PM, Jim Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>
nd
<Snip>
ting
<Snip>
eaned
<Snip>
ou
<Snip>
ss
<Snip>
ng my
<Snip>
ng.
<Snip>
imes
<Snip>
 of
<Snip>
nor
<Snip>
?,
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
-- =
Cory Creighton
LegalFish, LLC
P: 312.239.8670
F: 312 329 0930
cory.creighton
www.legalfish.com
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
      =
Homeroast mailing list
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Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820

103) From: Ira
At 12:36 AM 12/4/2008, you wrote:
<Snip>
Would someone please ban this guy!!!
Ira
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104) From: Angelo
What's wrong? You don't like a little spam with your coffee? :-)
I think he probably sells them...
<Snip>
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105) From: Skydragon454
I used to always vacuum pack mine (resealable vacuum bags) immediately  after 
cooling the beans. Once I tried resting them in an open bag, I never went  
back to vacuum sealing. I always finish mine with in 8-15 days. I now leave the  
bag unsealed for the first 2 days and then just zip it up after that. Since 
so  many seem to use glass for storage, I think I will try that next.
 
Eric
 
In a message dated 12/4/2008 11:47:05 A.M. Central Standard Time,  
royalcoffeedubai writes:
Try  www.tightpac.com containers, they are perfect vacuum containers for  
coffee
Sam
From:  Brian Kamnetz 
To:  homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008  7:57:35 PM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
Cory,
The  main thing I've heard on this topic is that it is not good to seal
the  coffee immediately after roasting because is seems to blunt the
flavors. Ed  (I think it was) says that his taste tests haven't shown
any difference  between leaving the roasted beans in an open bowl vs.
sealing them in a  jar, as long as they are consumed in 10 days or so.
Personally, after  roasting I put the coffee beans into a glass jar and
leave it open for a  day, then just set the lid on, without tightening,
for a couple days after  that. Then I start closing the lid. I don't
have a good reason for doing it  this way, other than wanting to avoid
sealing the beans immediately after  roasting.
Brian
On Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 5:20 PM, Cory Creighton   
wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast  mailing  list
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Homeroast  community pictures -upload yours!) :  http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20**************Make your life easier with all your friends, email, and 
favorite sites in one place.  Try it now. 
http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000010)Homeroast mailing list
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106) From: Jim Wilson
Ed wrote:
I have never found a reason to rest coffee.  I like the greater intensity of 
flavor that comes with beans freshly roasted.  Some tend to favor those with 
a more muted profile and might find benefit in 'resting' the beans.
The bulk of the coffee flavors are pretty durable and remain flavorful for a 
couple of weeks, but the very volatile and elusive, delicate flavors I crave 
go away in a day or two.
*********************
Ed Needham
~~~~I like em rough and ready too, single origins, but I've found roasting some of Tom's green blends that they require a rest period of 48 hours for better flavor
Jake
Reddick Fla.
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107) From: Jim Wilson
Cory asks-
Good to know about the bags.  I think I will give them a try.
Immediately when I'm done roasting a batch I always put the beans in a mesh
colander and  proceed to shake the beans until they are at room temp.  Do
this for two reasons, one obliviously to cool and also to remove any
additional chaff that may remain on the beans, thus preventing any problems
when initially opening the jar.  Is this a normal method that I'm using or
am I wasting time and effort cooling in the colander?  Do you do anything to
cool the beans or do you let them cool naturally in a bowl or something?  I
was paranoid to keep my precious beans uncovered as I thought they would
lose flavor or aroma.  Good to know about letting the gas out.
Roast On!
Cory
~~~~Your cooling method sounds fine to me.  I use a Behmor Roaster to roast my green beans and the machine has a cooling cycle (drum rotates-fan forced air cools the beans) which takes care of cooling needs, so no need to do the colander routine but that was the method I used when I was roasting with a fluid bed roaster (Poppery 2), except I placed the colander on top of a box fan that I positioned horozontally atop a pair of tool boxes in my garage...worked fine but with the Behmor drum roaster, no need to manually cool the hot roast
Jake
Reddick Fla.
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108) From: Royalcoffeedubai Fzco
Thanks
From: Ira 
To: homeroast
Sent: Thursday, December 4, 2008 10:51:16 PM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Resting Time
At 12:36 AM 12/4/2008, you wrote:
<Snip>
Would someone please ban this guy!!!
Ira
Homeroast mailing list
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