HomeRoast Digest


Topic: [Re: [Re: +ISH review - part 2, the 36 hour espresso]] (2 msgs / 43 lines)
1) From: Rick Farris
Charlie Herlihy  wrote:
<Snip>
Hmm....I almost always roast a "spread" of batches, and this time was no
exception, so I'll try the batch I roasted darkest -- oily and black, wel=
l
into 2nd -- both ways, press and espresso.
<Snip>
How do y'all roast your Monkey blend?  I find that when I try to roast it=
dark, it comes out tasting burnt and when I roast it light, it's sour.  W=
hat
am I missing?  One thing I noticed when I moved to Arizona, is that coffe=
e
roasts much more quickly here in the high-altitude, dry air than in San D=
iego.
 Roasts that were taking me 9- to 10- minutes in San Diego typically take=
 less
than 5-minutes here.  Do you think that's what's causing my sour-tasting
roasts?
-- Rick
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2) From: Charlie Herlihy
Charlie Herlihy  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
When I wrote "well into second crack I didn't mean all the way to "oily and black",sorry, just to an oily sheen., chocolate color.
<Snip>
<Snip>
 I can only guess you're roasting too hot and fast. Other folks have wondered about how ambient humidity affects roasting. I have no idea. It's always dry here, but the inside of a brick oven will always be dry no matter what. I'd think that all of our roasters pre dry the air that heats the beans. 500 degree air couldn't hold much humidity could it? Stored beans would be wetter or dryer depending on ambient humidity and we try to level that playing field in the early stages of the roast by bringing up to cracking temp. in a couple of stages, the length of them depending on the amount of beans and their moisture level. and the heat supplied depending on how long it's taking to reach those stages  Is it damp enough in San Diego to affect stored beans that much?  Just how high an elevetion are you roasting at now?The south east US would really be the place where stored coffee could gain instead of lose moisture over time. Must be a  concern.                                     
                                                            The Monkey blend , because it's a mix of differant beans, is trickier than roasting a single bean. I get just a few that overroast and a couple of slightly too light beans per batch, but otherwise have no trouble stopping just into rolling second crack as Tom suggests. A quick cool down is vital to prevent it from tasting "dark French" roasted. Seems like you need more control over the temp. at the different stages of your roasts(?)  good luck!
Charlie
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