HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New to list and soon to roasting! (3 msgs / 178 lines)
1) From: Aurelio & Jenifer
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
Wow!  What a wonderful website and discussion 
group!  My wife has been on me to find a new, less expensive, hobby than 
high-end audio.  Much to her chagrin, I've chosen coffee roasting! 
;-)  So, it's either thousands of dollars spent on audio equipment or a 
house full of smoke!  But I digress... I've been a coffee lover since 
college, so it was only a natural progression that this obsession would lead to 
the roasting of my own coffee.  Like any other hobby I undertake, I try to 
research it to death before I jump in, which is why I joined this list.  
Your comments have taught me much in the last few weeks - thank you!  I 
have some very simple questions I was hoping you could help me 
with:
 
1.  Who is "Tom" and is there a "Sweet Maria"? 
;-)
 
2.  The coffee roaster from which I 
currently buy my coffee (at $16/lb!) always talks about a "bean's ability 
to hold a dark roast".  What does this mean?  For example, he prefers 
to use Brazilian Santos for espresso roast due to its ability to hold a dark 
roast.  I prefer Sumatra Mandehling at an espresso roast, which he 
discourages.
 
3.  Do particular beans have a "peak" roast at 
which they are most flavorful?  In other words, it seems that Full City 
Roast is what most of you roast at, but I see many beans in shops, like Kenya 
AA, that always seem to be roasted at a lighter roast like American or 
City.
 
4.  From everything I've read in books and at 
Sweet Maria's website, it sounds like you get more body from a stove-top roaster 
(i.e. non-air) but the drawback is that it may take 15-20 minutes versus a few 
minutes in an air popper.  Body is very important to me, so I would like to 
go with a stove top roaster.  However, with a stove-top, I wouldn't roast 
the coffee each time before I brew it.  I would probably brew every week or 
two and store it appropriately.  With an air-popper, I would probably roast 
the coffee each day just before I brew it since it takes no time and little 
effort.  So, the question becomes....do I go with an air popper to have the 
freshest roast possible before brewing, or is it still better to go with the 
stove-top roaster even though my beans could be a week or so old when 
brewing but have greater body?
 
Any feedback would be greatly 
appreciated!!!
 
Mr. Aurelio Stella
Clawson, Michigan, USA
 
"Real espresso drinkers don't use a lemon peel" 
;-)
 
 

2) From: Ken Mary
Re: + New to list and soon to roasting!
First order of business is for you to set your mailer to plain text.
The peak roast is to *your* preference and brew method. That is the main advantage that we homeroasters have over the commercial roasters. If you haven't already, read Kenneth Davids' books, especially "Home Coffee Roasting". I prefer the light roasts, sometimes stopping shortly after the end of first crack.
I have no experience with a stovetop roaster, but it may be the most difficult method with which to start. Try a popcorn popper first to get familiar with the process and associated problems like chaff, smoke, and odor.
If you prefer lots of body, you must choose an origin famous for that character, like Sumatra, and roast no darker than 235 C. The length of roast time may influence the amount of body. The roast apparatus may be important only to the extent that it provides the required time.
Coffee consumption may be the deciding factor in choosing a roaster. About one week is the maximum storage time for fresh coffee. I normally consume one roast worth every two to three days. IMO, for greater body, you should let the coffee rest at least 24 hours or even 48 hours before brewing. There is nothing wrong with brewing immediately after the roast, but consider the alternatives.
-- 
Ken Mary - Aromaroast - whirlyblade - decanter
----------
From: "Aurelio & Jenifer" <isanum1>
To: "Marias Sweet" <homeroast>
Subject: + New to list and soon to roasting!
Date: Wed, Jun 28, 2000, 12:28 PM
Wow!  What a wonderful website and discussion group!  My wife has been on me to find a new, less expensive, hobby than high-end audio.  Much to her chagrin, I've chosen coffee roasting! ;-)  So, it's either thousands of dollars spent on audio equipment or a house full of smoke!  But I digress... I've been a coffee lover since college, so it was only a natural progression that this obsession would lead to the roasting of my own coffee.  Like any other hobby I undertake, I try to research it to death before I jump in, which is why I joined this list.  Your comments have taught me much in the last few weeks - thank you!  I have some very simple questions I was hoping you could help me with:
 
1.  Who is "Tom" and is there a "Sweet Maria"? ;-)
 
2.  The coffee roaster from which I currently buy my coffee (at $16/lb!) always talks about a "bean's ability to hold a dark roast".  What does this mean?  For example, he prefers to use Brazilian Santos for espresso roast due to its ability to hold a dark roast.  I prefer Sumatra Mandehling at an espresso roast, which he discourages.
 
3.  Do particular beans have a "peak" roast at which they are most flavorful?  In other words, it seems that Full City Roast is what most of you roast at, but I see many beans in shops, like Kenya AA, that always seem to be roasted at a lighter roast like American or City.
 
4.  From everything I've read in books and at Sweet Maria's website, it sounds like you get more body from a stove-top roaster (i.e. non-air) but the drawback is that it may take 15-20 minutes versus a few minutes in an air popper.  Body is very important to me, so I would like to go with a stove top roaster.  However, with a stove-top, I wouldn't roast the coffee each time before I brew it.  I would probably brew every week or two and store it appropriately.  With an air-popper, I would probably roast the coffee each day just before I brew it since it takes no time and little effort.  So, the question becomes....do I go with an air popper to have the freshest roast possible before brewing, or is it still better to go with the stove-top roaster even though my beans could be a week or so old when brewing but have greater body?
 
Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!!!
 
Mr. Aurelio Stella
Clawson, Michigan, USA
 
"Real espresso drinkers don't use a lemon peel" ;-)
 
 

3) From: Texinga
In a message dated 6/28/2000 12:31:36 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
isanum1 writes:
<< I have some very simple questions I was hoping you could help me with:
 
<< 1.  Who is "Tom" and is there a "Sweet Maria"? ;-)
He's Tom...you know..what'sis last name..oh well, we just know him as Tom 
(owner of Sweet Maria's).  Yes there is a "Sweet Maria"...do some mining at 
Tom's site and you'll find out...oh ok, here's the 
url..http://www.sweetmarias.com/sm.shop.html 
<< 2.  The coffee roaster from which I currently buy my coffee (at $16/lb!) 
always talks about a "bean's ability to hold a dark roast".  What does this 
mean?  For example, he prefers to use Brazilian Santos for espresso roast due 
to its ability to hold a dark roast.  I prefer Sumatra Mandehling at an 
espresso roast, which he discourages.
Well, I'm no expert, but there definitely are beans that are better IMO when 
roasted dark.  Even with beans like a Kenya that have full flavor at a 
lighter roast, I like to roast it darker because I'm no fan of bright fruity 
flavors.  Good news is..by homeroasting, you will be able to stop paying 
$16/lb for a roast that doesn't meet your tastes.  For once, you'll get your 
favorite bean the way you like it.  You'll be able to experiment in some new 
ways too that are not possible with most commercial coffee vendors.
 
 <<3.  Do particular beans have a "peak" roast at which they are most 
flavorful?  In other words, it seems that Full City Roast is what most of you 
roast at, but I see many beans in shops, like Kenya AA, that always seem to 
be roasted at a lighter roast like American or City.
Yes, roast level/method has a lot to do with getting good results with a 
particular bean.  Some beans are more forgiving than others and have a 
broader roast spectrum that still deliver good flavor.  You will discover 
this as you roast different beans and it is an excellent learning experience. 
 When Tom includes 8-packs of beans with some of his roasters, he is actually 
doing you a "learning favor" more than a sales perk.
 
<< 4.  From everything I've read in books and at Sweet Maria's website, it 
sounds like you get more body from a stove-top roaster (i.e. non-air) but the 
drawback is that it may take 15-20 minutes versus a few minutes in an air 
popper.  Body is very important to me, so I would like to go with a stove top 
roaster.  However, with a stove-top, I wouldn't roast the coffee each time 
before I brew it.  I would probably brew every week or two and store it 
appropriately.  With an air-popper, I would probably roast the coffee each 
day just before I brew it since it takes no time and little effort.  So, the 
question becomes....do I go with an air popper to have the freshest roast 
possible before brewing, or is it still better to go with the stove-top 
roaster even though my beans could be a week or so old when brewing but have 
greater body?
From my experience, you should pick a roaster that meets your taste needs and 
that you will enjoy using.  For example, I went with the AlpenRost because I 
don't want to roast every day, but I also use about 1/2lb of coffee every 4-5 
days.  I also chose the Alp because I love Indonesian coffee that has a lot 
of body and lower acidity.  Some beans need to rest for 2-3 days before they 
really hit their peak.  So, even if you roast every day, it's likely that you 
will be roasting for use that is 2-3 days out.    Read Tom's pluses and 
minuses section on each roaster type and you should find one that speaks to 
your overall needs.
 
 >>Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!!!
My pleasure and best wishes.


HomeRoast Digest