HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Chemex Brewing (33 msgs / 1072 lines)
1) From: Ed Needham
Scott...
I used to use a standard amount for everything, but now I vary the amount for
different roasts and definitely different grinds.  I've abandoned my little
junky Hearthware grinder for drip and now use my La Pavoni commercial 'ZIP'
grinder for drip and espresso.  A real pain, but the result is so astounding
I just can't go back.  With that grinder, I can actually make the coffee much
stronger, and with the CM-4, I am using 3/4 cup of grinds (sorry, I don't
weigh it) per pot, using enough water to take it up to the second glass bead.
Ed Needham
ed
****************************************
**********************************************

2) From:
Wanted to ask a question before everyone went to sleep!  I did look thru the
archives, I was sure we had just talked about this but I cannot find it,
perhaps it is with a different subject heading.
How many grams of coffee do you use with the Chemex?  And how fine is the
grind?  Tom says two rounded tablespoons to 6 oz- but I remember some
discussion over it in the last month.
I thought for sure I could find it in the archives again- but there were
just too many to open each one.  Does it have a search option? I didn't see
one.
Thanks you,
Scott Jensen
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
From: 
Subject: +Chemex Brewing
Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 23:09:42 -0500
<Snip>
The quantity I put is considered 100+% more than normal so it wouldn't
be a good guide for you. The #1 thing I hate: watery coffee. I don't
buy coffee at stores not just because they're stale but also for this
reason. But they are making watery coffee because someone likes it
(among other obvious reasons). Only you'll know your taste.
After the preamble, I put about 40g per 12oz water or 17g per 5 fl. oz
cup. Ummm... it's way too much caffeine to me...  At the same time, I
also enjoy very light tea like premium green tea from Yunnan.
Chemex can handle very fine grinding but I like it slightly to the
coarse side to promote faster water flow. The #2, too long extraction
time. I usually try to finish extraction in 3.5 to 4 minutes. If you
adapt my criterion, you can time your extraction and adjust your
grinding accordingly. With Chemex the time is mostly determined by
grinding; how often you pour doesn't change much.
Either way, I strongly suggest you try various settings and find what
is best for you. You can use Chemex in so many different ways.
Disclaimer: opinions stated above are personal preferences and should
not be taken as factual statements.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Rick Farris
Scott wrote:
<Snip>
We just had a long discussion about that.  I use about a gram per ounce (40
grams to 40oz water).  But my coffee takes about 8.5 minutes to brew,
perhaps I'm grinding too fine.  Most people were using more, up to about 2
grams/oz.
<Snip>
Many suggest midrange on your grinder.  More specifically midrange on your
Solis Maestro.
I suggest experimentation; the idea is to get a four to five minute
extraction at a strength you like.  Increase the grain size until it
extracts in four minutes, and then it may be necessary to add more coffee to
bring the strength back up, which may require increasing the grain size
again to bring the extraction time back to four minutes.  Repeat.  :-)
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: EskWIRED
 Tom says two rounded tablespoons to 6 oz- but I remember some
<Snip>
On average, how much does 2 tablespoons of coffee weigh?
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: EskWIRED
<Snip>
Do you use the 4 minute benchmark no matter what size pot you make?  I use a
cup-top pourover sometimes, which will accept a number 4 filter.  I use it
for a single mug, and I use it to make a thermos full as well, on occasion.
One mug's worth of water pours through very fast - about 30 seconds.  I use
a lot of coffee - 4 tablespoons for a single 10-12 ounce mug.  Obviously
this is underextracted, but makes very tasty coffee.
If you were to make only a cup or two in the chemex, would you still shoot
for a 4 minute pour?
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: Ed Needham
The only time a fine grind works with Chemex is if you are making a very
small amount.  A fine grind for a larger amount clogs the filter and reduces
the flow to a drip, and severely overextracts the coffee.  A grind similar to
a supermarket drip grind is very close to the best.  A Melitta drip can take
a very fine grind,but the flow on a Melitta is much faster.
As to strength, I 'always' brew on the side of too strong.  You can always
add hot water to make it a bit weaker, but you can't do anything to a weak
brew.
Ed Needham
ed
****************************************
**********************************************

8) From: Rick Farris
Eskwired wrote:
<Snip>
In theory, yes.  In practice, if I was only making a cup or two, I'd use my
push-pot or my melitta two-cupper.  (And still shoot for four minutes of
extraction.)
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

9) From:
Thanks for  all the Chemex help!
I took the pot to work today with some of the Miel, Purple Mountain Kona and
Kenya Karani.  Had my bodum Hot H2O pot and Zassenhaus grinder and we made 4
or 5 pots of coffee.  It was all very strong!!  But it was so good and
smooth that we didn't want to change the ratio.
Pretty much made converts of everyone- the Bunn is faster- but the flavors
from the chemex were just incredible.  Of course some of that was probably
due to the Zass, normally at work we just use a whirly blade.
I think it was longer than a 4 minute extraction, but it was still great
coffee!
Scott
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

10) From: Ed Needham
Don't even try to get a drip to do a four minute extraction, especially a
Chemex.  Four minutes is the time the water is in contact with the coffee,
and in a drip, that does not mean the total brew cycle.  T:30 or 4 minutes
works well with a press pot, but a drip/Chemex is a totally different bird.
Just aim for a grind that produces the best brew and a steady stream out the
bottom throughout the pourings, and you'll get a great brew.
PS...Eye surgery for the detached retina went well yesterday (8/2 Friday),
and I am (painfully) recovering.  Tylenol 4's are helping a bit (and feel
pretty good!) I am squinting through one eye as the other is covered and
basically unusable at the time.  Hopefully I'll be getting better in a week
or so and start moving on with my life.  I roasted enough coffee for a week,
so I think I'm set.
Ed Needham
ed
****************************************
**********************************************

11) From: Steve Barber
Hi all,
I just bought a brand spanking new Chemex Brewer and I have a couple of
questions that perhaps someone could help me with. Basically, I don't like
the taste of the coffee from it. I usually use a Cuisinart pot or a FP. The
brew from the Chemex has a funky sort of bitter aftertaste to it that I dont
get from the Cuisinart or the FP. It seems that it takes a long time for me
to get all the water through the Chemex (10 cup model). I really thought
that  I had the coffee ground course enough - I used the same grind that I
usually use for the Cuisinart but not as course a grind as I use for the FP.
In a sid by side taste comparison I much prefered the Cusinart to the Chemex
which surprised the heck out of me. I am thinking that the grind is too fine
or something like that, but would that cause the funky aftertaste that I am
experiencing? Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Steve
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

12) From: Allon Stern
On Jun 11, 2008, at 10:04 AM, Steve Barber wrote:
<Snip>
What are you using to grind the coffee? Sounds like you're getting  
some overextraction...
-
allon
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

13) From: Steve Barber
Allon,
I have an oldie goldie Estro burr grinder.....ever hear of one of those? Got
it at a yard sale...thought it was a good deal but maybe not.
Steve
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 11:55 AM, Allon Stern  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

14) From: Steve Barber
So I am supposing that a courser grind than I have been using would be
better?
Steve
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 12:05 PM, Steve Barber  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

15) From: Ed Needham
The Chemex will accentuate the flavors in your beans.  If there's an off 
taste, it will find it.
If you're using a whirly blade grinder...upgrade to a burr grinder.  The 
powder and chunks will be a nightmare in the thicker Chemex filters.  The 
dust will plug the pours and stall the drip, and they will overextract in 
the process.
Your grind should be about the same size as storebought preground coffee.
Wet the grinds first without letting too much water flow into the pot.  Use 
water just off the boil.  Make your next pour about an inch or so from the 
rim, and let it subside most of the way, then pour the rest in slowly so you 
don't disturb the grinds too much.  The second slow pour keeps the filter 
from getting more clogged.
If there is not a steady pour from the bottom of the cone, you have a 
problem and it won't taste good.  Also use white filters, the brown ones 
make the coffee taste nasty.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

16) From: Gary Townsend
What Ed said, exactly!  I scored another handblown Chemex (I have 4 of them
,now) this last weekend.
I use mine everyday, paired with a Rocky grinder and a 1970's Norelco Ready
Brewer.
Another thing to think about is getting the total extraction time (the time
from when you 1st add in the water until the last drip drops), to 4 minutes.
Any longer than that, and you will be getting more bitterness in your cup.
Get your grind sized right. Use 1 cup of grounds to 48 oz of water to start
with (SCAA coffee/water ratio) this is what I make everyday. Make sure that
you are using a filtered water that tastes good to you.
Gary
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 6:43 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

17) From: Steve Barber
Thanks guys for the info.....I was using the brown filters so I will try the
white ones. Also I am pretty sure that I was clogging up the filter because
the coffee was awfully slow going through. I wouls say it took about ten
minutes for me to get it all through. I'll let you know how the next batch
goes.
Steve
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 7:27 PM, Gary Townsend  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

18) From: Lynne
I use a whirly blade (ya gotta use whatever ya got..), grind them kind of
fine. Have
been enjoying the greatest cups from this - bought this (an eBay score -
think this
might be one of the handblown ones) so I could leave my beloved French Press
(and maybe help my cholesterol, too).
I usually make 2 big mugs - tried to make 3 the other day, and I used too
much coffee -
it was dreadful.
Lynne
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

19) From: Bryan Wray
It's also important to pre-wash the filters (in my experience).  Wet, ring out, wet, ring out, etc.  I do this 4 or 5 times to get a lot of the "paper" taste out.  People say they can't taste the filters, but I know that I sure can, even if perhaps it is psychological.  
Everyone else's advice is spot on.
Pour around the outsides as you go so as to keep the grounds in the water and not stuck to the filter.  Otherwise you will underextract the ones that get stuck at the top of the filter and overextract the ones at the bottom of the cone.
Also, sometimes I find it necessary to pick up the filter a little to release a sort of seal that seems to stop the flow.  Anyone else find this?
To give you an idea of grind size:  Know the big bulk grinders at super-markets?  Most of them are Bunn models and if the one that you are looking at is, try it at the "Electric Perc." setting.  Maybe find some super cheap grocery store beans (or if you are lucky enough to be able to get some quality ones from a store and find a grinder that hasn't had a ton of flavored coffee run through it... and good luck with that one) and run them through a grinder on that setting just to get an idea of the grind size.
But yes, I think the most important thing mentioned so far is that the Chemex is an extremely revealing method of brewing.  I think the only thing more revealing is espresso (and only because there are more variables in espresso preparation than in drip preparation).  If there is anything wrong with your beans, water, temperature, grind, etc, etc, etc, the Chemex will REALLY bring those out.
HTH
-Bry
BTW, totally offtopic:  I can reply to messages but cannot start a topic at all.  I have tried numerous times but I cannot start a new topic, only reply to ones previously started.  It's really frustrating.  Anyone have any ideas?
&quot;It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art&quot;- Chris Owens of Cafe Grumpy in NYC.
--- On Wed, 6/11/08, Gary Townsend <garybt3> wrote:
From: Gary Townsend <garybt3>
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Chemex Brewing
To: homeroast, "Ed Needham" <ed>
Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 8:27 PM
What Ed said, exactly!  I scored another handblown Chemex (I have 4 of them
,now) this last weekend.
I use mine everyday, paired with a Rocky grinder and a 1970's Norelco Ready
Brewer.
Another thing to think about is getting the total extraction time (the time
from when you 1st add in the water until the last drip drops), to 4 minutes.
Any longer than that, and you will be getting more bitterness in your cup.
Get your grind sized right. Use 1 cup of grounds to 48 oz of water to start
with (SCAA coffee/water ratio) this is what I make everyday. Make sure that
you are using a filtered water that tastes good to you.
Gary
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 6:43 PM, Ed Needham <ed> wrote:
> The Chemex will accentuate the flavors in your beans.  If there's an
off
> taste, it will find it.
> If you're using a whirly blade grinder...upgrade to a burr grinder. 
The
> powder and chunks will be a nightmare in the thicker Chemex filters.  The
> dust will plug the pours and stall the drip, and they will overextract in
> the process.
> Your grind should be about the same size as storebought preground coffee.
>
> Wet the grinds first without letting too much water flow into the pot. 
Use
> water just off the boil.  Make your next pour about an inch or so from the
> rim, and let it subside most of the way, then pour the rest in slowly so
you
> don't disturb the grinds too much.  The second slow pour keeps the
filter
> from getting more clogged.
> If there is not a steady pour from the bottom of the cone, you have a
> problem and it won't taste good.  Also use white filters, the brown
ones
> make the coffee taste nasty.
> *********************
> Ed Needham
> "to absurdity and beyond!"
>http://www.homeroaster.com> *********************
>
>

20) From: Bryan Wray
Why are there crazy letters in my reply?
&quot;It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art&quot;- Chris Owens of Cafe Grumpy in NYC.
--- On Wed, 6/11/08, Bryan Wray <bwray_thatcoffeeguy> wrote:
From: Bryan Wray <bwray_thatcoffeeguy>
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Chemex Brewing
To: homeroast
Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 9:47 PM
It's also important to pre-wash the filters (in my experience).&nbsp;
Wet, ring out, wet, ring out, etc.&nbsp; I do this 4 or 5 times to get a
lot of the "paper" taste out.&nbsp; People say they can't
taste the filters, but I know that I sure can, even if perhaps it is
psychological.&nbsp; 
Everyone else's advice is spot on.
Pour around the outsides as you go so as to keep the grounds in the water and
not stuck to the filter.&nbsp; Otherwise you will underextract the ones
that get stuck at the top of the filter and overextract the ones at the bottom
of the cone.
Also, sometimes I find it necessary to pick up the filter a little to release a
sort of seal that seems to stop the flow.&nbsp; Anyone else find this?
To give you an idea of grind size:&nbsp; Know the big bulk grinders at
super-markets?&nbsp; Most of them are Bunn models and if the one that you
are looking at is, try it at the "Electric Perc." setting.&nbsp;
Maybe find some super cheap grocery store beans (or if you are lucky enough to
be able to get some quality ones from a store and find a grinder that
hasn't had a ton of flavored coffee run through it... and good luck with
that one) and run them through a grinder on that setting just to get an idea of
the grind size.
But yes, I think the most important thing mentioned so far is that the Chemex
is an extremely revealing method of brewing.&nbsp; I think the only thing
more revealing is espresso (and only because there are more variables in
espresso preparation than in drip preparation).&nbsp; If there is anything
wrong with your beans, water, temperature, grind, etc, etc, etc, the Chemex
will REALLY bring those out.
HTH
-Bry
BTW, totally offtopic:&nbsp; I can reply to messages but cannot start a
topic at all.&nbsp; I have tried numerous times but I cannot start a new
topic, only reply to ones previously started.&nbsp; It's really
frustrating.&nbsp; Anyone have any ideas?
&amp;quot;It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a
caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art&amp;quot;- Chris Owens
of Cafe Grumpy in NYC.
--- On Wed, 6/11/08, Gary Townsend &lt;garybt3&gt; wrote:
From: Gary Townsend &lt;garybt3&gt;
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Chemex Brewing
To: homeroast, "Ed Needham"
&lt;ed&gt;
Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 8:27 PM
What Ed said, exactly!  I scored another handblown Chemex (I have 4 of them
,now) this last weekend.
I use mine everyday, paired with a Rocky grinder and a 1970's Norelco Ready
Brewer.
Another thing to think about is getting the total extraction time (the time
from when you 1st add in the water until the last drip drops), to 4 minutes.
Any longer than that, and you will be getting more bitterness in your cup.
Get your grind sized right. Use 1 cup of grounds to 48 oz of water to start
with (SCAA coffee/water ratio) this is what I make everyday. Make sure that
you are using a filtered water that tastes good to you.
Gary
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 6:43 PM, Ed Needham &lt;ed&gt;
wrote:
&gt; The Chemex will accentuate the flavors in your beans.  If there's
an
off
&gt; taste, it will find it.
&gt; If you're using a whirly blade grinder...upgrade to a burr
grinder. 
The
&gt; powder and chunks will be a nightmare in the thicker Chemex filters. 
The
&gt; dust will plug the pours and stall the drip, and they will overextract
in
&gt; the process.
&gt; Your grind should be about the same size as storebought preground
coffee.
&gt;
&gt; Wet the grinds first without letting too much water flow into the pot.
Use
&gt; water just off the boil.  Make your next pour about an inch or so from
the
&gt; rim, and let it subside most of the way, then pour the rest in slowly
so
you
&gt; don't disturb the grinds too much.  The second slow pour keeps the
filter
&gt; from getting more clogged.
&gt; If there is not a steady pour from the bottom of the cone, you have a
&gt; problem and it won't taste good.  Also use white filters, the
brown
ones
&gt; make the coffee taste nasty.
&gt; *********************
&gt; Ed Needham
&gt; "to absurdity and beyond!"
&gt;http://www.homeroaster.com&gt; *********************
&gt;
&gt;

21) From: Joseph Robertson
Bryan,
Lynn said the same thing about the strange characters. Gmail or SM's ? There
is a clue here somewhere.
JoeR
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 6:47 PM, Bryan Wray 
wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ambassador for Specialty Coffee and pallet reform.
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

22) From: Allon Stern
On Jun 11, 2008, at 1:05 PM, Steve Barber wrote:
<Snip>
When was the last time those old burrs were replaced?
Yeah, I didn't think so.
-
allon
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

23) From: Ed Needham
Bryan, that's even over the top for me.  The white filters really don't 
impart any perceptible taste to the coffee in my experience.  If it makes 
your coffee experience more enjoyable, then have at it.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

24) From: Dean De Crisce
I am a little confused. Would the chemex give any different result than a pourover melitta type cone...if so why?
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo phone.

25) From: Rich
The crazy letters are the result of the code page you are using to 
compose your message.  One of the standards is Western (ISO-8859-1). 
Sometimes microsoft decides to use a neat code page.  You can see what 
it does...  could be the reason you can not initiate a thread also.
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

26) From: Michael Mccandless
It's all in the filter medium.
McSparky
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 8:46 PM, Dean De Crisce 
wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

27) From: Steve Barber
I just wanted to tell you all who gave suggestions.....a big Thanks! My
problem with the Chemex was that the brewing was taking much too long
thereby giving me a bitter cup due to overextraction. I want you to know
that I just brewed a pot per suggestions (brew time around 4 minutes or so)
and all is right with the world.
Steve
On Thu, Jun 12, 2008 at 4:43 PM, Michael Mccandless 
wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

28) From: Ed Needham
Well, there are several variables between the Melitta and the Chemex, 
including the thinner Melitta filter, the ribbed filter cone, and the little 
drain home at the bottom vs. a thicker Chemex cone with three layers on one 
side when folded, a smooth filter cone and no hole at the bottom.  The grind 
for a Melitta needs to be much finer than for the Chemex, since the water 
drains very fast if the Melitta grind is regular or coarse.
Each makes a good cup of coffee, but I prefer the Chemex for complexity and 
richness of flavor.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

29) From: Lynne
Steve -
When I made my morning cup (that ended up being in the afternoon - long
boring story), I was thinking that this *had* to be the answer. My cups have
been great - however, I only make one or two cups (mugs, really). I grind
fine - but I remember that Tom himself wrote somewhere on the list that this
was O.K. w/this very forgivable method of brewing coffee. My grinder is a
whirly-grind; can't do medium grinds - and for a couple of cups, this is
fine.
I did make a larger pot last wk - it turned out awful (forgot all about it -
we dumped it). I blamed myself for it - now realize it was most likely over
extracted, too.
Glad you figured it out - hope you are enjoying the Chemex now.
Lynne
On Thu, Jun 12, 2008 at 7:49 PM, Steve Barber  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

30) From: Steve Barber
Lynne,
Funny that you should mention this...I tried to make a full pot today and
had a bit of trouble, but it wasnt as bad as it had been. When I make about
a half pot or a couple of cups worth I have no trouble at all. I guess we
are in the same boat. Heck, I only need to make a couple of cups worth at a
time anyway....I'm the only coffee drinker in my house.
Steve
On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 12:24 PM, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

31) From: Paul Helbert
Ed,
Thanks for that. Sometimes just reading everyone's input pays off.
This morning I reduced the particle size for my Melita #2 rig and got
the best cup it ever produced. Why didn't I notice that it was passing
through too fast? Duh!
On Thu, Jun 12, 2008 at 9:34 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Paul Helbert
Prepackaged, roasted & ground coffee,,,
Some of the worst ideas since sliced bread.
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

32) From: Paul Helbert
Thanks to Ed's post I've been grinding much finer for my little Melita
#2 this week. It has slowed down the throughput nicely. I normally
brew two cups with the little Melita. One for me and one for my dad. I
have always taken the first one and left the second for him since he
masks his coffee with a double dollop of honey and condensed milk. I
notice, with the finer grind, that my first cup was still passing too
quickly and that the second cup was infusing longer in the cone.
This morning, rather than doing as I have always done (moving the
filter cone from the first cup to the second) I found a monster mug,
preheated it and brewed the whole pour into it, then divided the
coffee into two preheated cups. The result reminds me of the better
cup that I get from the Chemex (even though the paper filter was of
lighter gage).
Leaves me thinking that one of the advantages of the Chemex over the
small Melita is the homogeneous mixing of all parts of extraction into
a single vessel rather than having different fractions in different
cups. This carafe effect may be more important than the type of filter
paper used. It would be hard to reverse the experiment since the
Chemex needs the sturdier paper to support the infusion. The flimsy
paper filter which works with eh Melita would fall into the bottom of
the Chemex without added support. (I do not use special filters with
the Melita...just cheap basket style filters scrunched to fit).
Another possible explanation may be that size matters. The larger
volume of the Chemex filter allows better mixing in the filter,
especially in the pre-wetting phase. With the Melita, I'm still
pouring through bloom by the time the first cup is full, while the
second cup gets all the grounds washed down the walls and collected
near the bottom.
Whatever the reason, the result is the same. The coffee is better when
it is all caught in one container and then distributed to the cups. I
have noticed this before in "catching" a cup out of an automatic
coffee machine. The early cups are strong and the later ones weak; and
removal of any before the finish ruins the pot.
On Thu, Jun 12, 2008 at 9:34 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Paul Helbert
Prepackaged, roasted & ground coffee,,,
Some of the worst ideas since sliced bread.
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

33) From: Bryan Wray
(Quote) Paul Herbert-
Whatever the reason, the result is the same. The coffee is better when
it is all caught in one container and then distributed to the cups. I
have noticed this before in "catching" a cup out of an automatic
coffee machine. The early cups are strong and the later ones weak; and
removal of any before the finish ruins the pot. (end quote)
...Well... uh... yeah...  I mean, I don't want to offend, but... duh?  Ever watch a shot of espresso blond?  Try the experiment where you line up 5 different demitasse cups and let each one fill for five seconds of the pour, then slide the first out, the second in, etc.  Each "shot" tastes pretty horrible (ones in the middle are alright, but not good).  It's all underextraction/overextraction no matter what type of preparation is used.
Jim Schulman's (sp?) article on the Science of Extraction (or something like that) over on HB is a great read (really long, but good).  I'd suggest looking it over.
-Bry
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens of Cafe Grumpy in NYC.
--- On Wed, 6/18/08, Paul Helbert  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20


HomeRoast Digest