HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Refrigerating or freezing - was +Re: St. Helena, Kona (7 msgs / 202 lines)
1) From: Irene and Lubos Palounek
" ...only taking out what I wanted to brew, and refreezing the rest..."
Remember what happens when you walk out from an air-conditioned room into
moist outside? The glasses fog as some moisture from the outside air
condenses on the colder surface.
Inside of an refrigerator or freezer is a very cold environment as compared
even to an air-conditioned room. Excessive moisture is an big enemy of
roasted beans. Make sure that, when you take out the very cold beans, they
are not exposed to a humid environment.  Otherwise, some moisture will
condense on the surface of the beans and destroy the quality of the coffee.
In fact, I do not know how to do it.
That's why people who refrigerate or freeze their coffee recommend to use
just small packages, so you can take the package out of the refrigerator or
freeze, wait for it to reach the room temperature before you open it and use
the coffee.
As I said in different thread:
It is interesting to note that David Schomer states on page 67 of his
excellent book "Espresso Coffee" that they do refrigerate the decaf due to
its extreme volatility after roasting. He states: "We put it into 1/2 pound
bags and each bag is put into a container before refrigeration. The decaf is
fine for up to a week after roasting if refrigerated right after roasting."
Remember that they use a lot of coffee.  1/2 pound is much less coffee as
compared to 1/2 pound means to me. I would probably use much smaller bags
for freezing.
Regards, Lubos
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2) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Irene and Lubos Palounek" 
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compared
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coffee.
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Re-vacuum sealing frozen canning jars of beans not only pulls out any 'air'
but the moisture in the air... The key is to take the vacuum sealed jar from
the freezer, pop the top and pour the frozen beans from the jar into the
grinder hopper, immediately re-vacumm seal the jar and return to freezer,
and then (after 5min or so to thaw) grind the beans from the freezer. Don't
leave the jar out long enough for the condensation process to have any
effect I've noticed.
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or
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use
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You can, and I have, made small individual vac packets. For home consumption
I don't. It calls for assuming all brew batches will be the same size and
it's much more work (and expense) than using canning jars and re-vac'ing. I
do use this method for travel. I also make up small vac packets of ground
for Debi to take to work...
MM;-)
Home Ju-Ju Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
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3) From: Bart Frazee
On Sat, 10 Aug 2002 12:29:07 -0500, you wrote:
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into
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I brew in a vac pot and use 40 gr/pot. My Popprey nets @85 gr. The 1/2
pint jars hold one batch. I take a jar out of the freezer, let it thaw
and am set for two days. If I'm blending it is still not more than I
will use before it gets stale.
Now that I have a Hot Top, I'll still use the 1/2 pint jars. Just more
of them.
Bart
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compared
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they
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coffee.
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use
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 or
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 use
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to
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pound
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decaf is
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roasting."
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as
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bags
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4) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Mike you seem to have the answers, I truly believe you are a genius
Ron Kyle
a coffee roaster from South Carolina
rnkyle

5) From: Rick Farris
Mike wrote:
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Mike, have you figured out any way to make a "string" of vac packets?  You
know what I mean, put some beans in, make a seal, put some more beans, make
another seal, etc?
I was thinking that when you started, you could take the long tail and wrap
it around a pencil and drop it in the vacuum tray, seal the first section,
unwrap the tail, add beans, wrap the remainder back around a pencil, and so
on.
The Tilia website mentions that the Pro model has a "larger" vacuum channel.
I wonder if that would make it easier.
I was just thinking that if you were making up, say, seven individual brew
packets of the same coffee, it would be convenient to have them all hooked
together.
-- Rick
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6) From: TFisher511
rick writes:
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On a different note, I was playing with maximizing bag utilization for small 
bags yesterday and came up with the following:
1) Take an 11" wide roll of Tilia FoodSaver bag material and cut off a strip 
4 1/2" long. This is about 1 1/2 lines on the sides.
2) Seal the bottom of the bag.
3) Cut the bag in half, width wise so you have two sealed 'V' 's that are 
half of the 11" wide original bag. Now seal the side that you just cut on 
each of the bags.
What is left is a bag 5 1/2' wide by 4 1/2" deep that holds just enough 
coffee for one pot. They may have to be made slightly deeper for those that 
use 300 grams of coffee per cup:) but this does make a more economical use of 
the bag material for small batches.
Terry F

7) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Terry wrote:
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That's pretty clever, Terry.  As you've probably noted, the Tilia material
is the same price per square inch no matter what form factor you buy it in.
Getting a narrower bag means less lost in the one-inch sealing section.
Thanks for the idea!
-- Rick


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