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Topic: Coffee tree varieties that sound like felines (was: Valvebags and vacuum - everything has an outgas point) (6 msgs / 249 lines)
1) From: Robert Cantor
Here's my outgas...
caturra?  (The Irish Lullaby feline)  try:http://www.juanvaldez.com/menu/history/trees.htmlno, really...     ;)
or catuai   (a bored feline)http://www.journal.au.edu/au_techno/article3.pdfhttp://www.dlcoffee.com/ultimate.htm
and there's another 2 species besides Robusta and Arabica, evidently they
taste even worse than Robusta!
Arabica varieties from  http://www.ico.org/acoff/botan.htm :
Mutants: Caturra - a compact form of bourbon Maragogipe - a mutant typica
with large beans San Ramon - a dwarf typica Purpurascens - purple leaved
forms
Cultivars have been developed to give the maximum economic return under
specific regional conditions such as climate, soil, methods of cultivation
and the prevalence of pests and diseases. Some of the better known cultivars
are:
Blue Mountain - grown in Jamaica and Kenya
Mundo Novo - a cross between typica and bourbon, originally grown in Brazil
Kent - originally developed in India, showing some disease resistance
Catuai - developed as a hybrid of Mundo Novo and Caturra, characterized by
either yellow or red cherries: Catuai-amarelo and Catuai-vermelho
respectively.
Bob C.
rcantor

2) From: Charlie Herlihy
Robert C. wroteKent - originally developed in
India, showing some disease resistance
Catuai - developed as a hybrid of Mundo Novo and
Caturra, characterized 
by
either yellow or red cherries: Catuai-amarelo and
Catuai-vermelho
respectively.
It's probably Catamor, the latest of the 'Cats" as far
as I know. A little more desease resistant at lower
elevations and full sun than Caturra or Cataui and
generaly thought of as lesser quality than either. I
don't like any of the Cat coffees personally because
the citrus aftertaste and their generaly high acidity
doesn't agree with me. Well grown at good elevation
they're pretty popular, though, with many including
Tom. The basis of CR and Columbian specialty coffee
and grown around the world now. Much more productive
for the farmers than typica and they do well in shade
or full sun. Need more fertilizer for those high
yields, however. They are much better than the newest
hybrids (var. Columbiana for example) which taste more
like robusta but pump out the tonnage.
The Kent variety(or so I've read) came from the few
arabica trees that survived the leaf rust fungus that
wiped out most of the arabica being grown below 300
meters (such as the famous Java plantations) 150 years
ago. From tasting it my guess is that is was a Bourbon
type.    The yellow Caturra and Catuai berries are
sure pretty, like yellow pie cherries.
Charlie
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3) From: Maria Tsang
I have just been to Yunnan, China and have tried some really good Bourbon
and Catamor.
Wonderful experience.

4) From: Robert Cantor
Catimor is a cross between Caturra and Hibrido de Timor and is resistant to
coffee leaf rust (Hemileia vastatrix).  (Hibrido de Timor is a natural
hybrid of arabica x robusta which resembles arabica coffee and has 44
chromosomes.)
Icatu hybrids are the result of repeated backcrossing of interspecific
arabica x robusta hybrids to arabica cultivars Mundo Novo and Caturra.
How were they brewed?  Did you know how they were roasted and how dark?
Where they were grown?  Not that any of that is needed to enjoy the coffee,
but we'd be interested in hearing more...
Bob C.
rcantor

5) From: Robert Cantor
Which reminds me, I always wonder why nobody sells coffee berry pulp in any
form.  Those who tear it off could sell it as jelly or pie filling, those
who ferment it off as wine or vinegar.  Rumor has it it's very good.
Bob C.
rcantor

6) From: Charlie Herlihy
Robert Cantor wrote>I always wonder why nobody sells
coffee berry pulp in 
any
form.  Those who tear it off could sell it as jelly or
pie filling, 
those
who ferment it off as wine or vinegar.  Rumor has it
it's very good.<
 Probably used for all those things
somewhere(Ethiopia?) but in southern Mexico the best
way to age and improve a rough mezcal is to soak a
bunch of fresh coffee pulp in a crock of the hard
stuff and let it sit for a year or two. The result is
a nector of the gods that could be sold for as much as
almost any aged single malt scotch, but rarely gets
beyond imediate family. I've seen coffee fruit wine
for sale, thanks to a govt. delevopement project
grant, but haven't had a chance to try it. The fruit
is very cherry like, but unlike the sweet cherries we
all love it hasn't been bred for more fruit and less
seed-just the opposite.When your walking up a steep,
hot trail in coffee country a few ripe coffee cherries
are more thirst quinching and refreshing than any pop
or sports bar.  The pulp does make the richest compost
I've ever seen, black and sweet smelling. Weed free,
too! Wherever coffee grows there are so many other
tropical fruits that win over coffee pulp for juice,
pie or wine.
Charlie
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