HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Texture (4 msgs / 141 lines)
1) From: Irene and Lubos Palounek
I plan to roast some espresso blends in our HotTop roaster. I will
appreciate any advice on best times for the "Monkey Blend", "Moka Kadir
Blend" and "Classic Italian Espresso Blend" -- they all  came from Sweet
Maria's about a week ago. We ordered 2 pounds of each, thus I want to roast
302.4g (2/3 of a pound) batches - each 2 pound bag split into three batches.
I aim for the "Northern Italian" roast, the middle roast in the "Roasting
Degree" picture in David Schomer's book or onhttp://www.lucidcafe.com/cafeforum/factors.html-- and will appreciate any
tips.
This Thursday afternoon, our new Isomac Tea espresso machine is scheduled to
be delivered by UPS to our home. Thus, I plan to roast some Moka Kadir blend
this Wednesday. I assume that I will need 14g of coffee for each "double
shot" and that I will get about 250g of roasted beans, each roasted batch
should provide enough coffee for about 18 double-shots of espresso, correct?
I want to aim for the best texture, aroma, and taste both for the coffee and
the milk; an espresso or cappuccino or café latte drink with silky, buttery
textures. I will appreciate any advice for that journey to a perfect cup.
Cheers, Lubos
---
In his "Book Of Coffee", Francesco Illy calls espresso a romantic,
remarkably aromatic, and complex liquid. It is at once a solution of sugars,
caffeine, acids, and proteins; a suspension of tiny particles of coffee
beans and minute bubbles of gas; an emulsion of oils and colloids -- all
concentrated into a small volume and covered with a light, brown-colored
foam known as "crema."
David Schomer wrote in his excellent "Espresso Coffee" book on pages 3 and
5: "...espresso can be made to taste exactly like ground coffee smells, only
more so. A honey-thick nectar ... combining the experience of flavor and
texture ... texture is featured always, and should feel like a pair of
velvet pajamas wrapped around your tongue.") Elsewhere, without the romantic
touch, he calls espresso "a polyphasic colloidal foam made by forcing
pressurized brewing water through finely ground, tightly packed coffee."
About milk texturing, David Schomer wrote starting on page 131 of his book:
Ultra-fine texture is the only desirable milk foam consistency for espresso
making.  ...the texture not only offers the most velvet-like mouth feel, but
also enhances to the highest degree coffee's flavor....milk texturing
featuring ultra-fine bubbles will enhance coffee's flavor, mouth feel, and
appearance.
===
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2) From: John Abbott
Lubos, 
    Monkey Blend came out extemely well as a 6 plus two pluses and it
was excellent.
     I haven't done any of the others yet - may not if I don't quit
losing beans under the drum.
On Mon, 2002-08-26 at 12:58, Irene and Lubos Palounek wrote:
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3) From: Jim Schulman
Hi,
AFAIK, the classic Northern Italian roast is as dark as possible without o=
il. 
For my modded FR+ that means very slow after the first crack, wait till th=
e 
beans are a little sweaty, then stop. When the beans cool, they are dry. A=
fter 
three, four days, some varieties show an oil gleam, others don't. I usuall=
y get 
only a few pops of the second crack at this roast point, but I hear drum 
roasters can go further and darker without getting oil.
I find the Tea works better with overfilled baskets (16 grams for the 14 g=
ram 
one) so that the tamped grounds touch the shower screen. Most E61 
machine owners seem to agree with this. 
It is a minor point however. The big thing is to realize that after the ma=
chine is 
turned on and warmed up, the water in the heatexchanger is at about 120C, 
and the head at exactly 100C (the circulating water boils inside the head)=
.. 
Before pulling the first shot, you should run 6 to 7 ounces of water to ge=
t both 
the HX and the brewhead into the 90 to 95 range. After that, you can pull =
one 
shot after another and the temperature will remain rock steady.
You can open the machine and adjust the pressurestat to get the brew temp 
you want. 1 bar is 120C boiler, and by design, 92.5 C espresso water. 1.25=
 
bar gets you up to 124C boiler, and about 95C water, 0.85 bar gets you to 
117C boiler, and about 90C coffee water. Lower temperatures brew a brighte=
r 
cup, higher ones, a more syrupy cup. Try the factory setting, and do furth=
er 
adjustments to suit your taste.
Feel free to email me offlist if you have any questions, I can answer them=
 to 
the point of mind numbing boredom.
Jim
On 26 Aug 2002 at 12:58, Irene and Lubos Palounek wrote:
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4) From: Dan Bollinger
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From the picture and description, these seems to be a Full City Roast on the
dark side. Dan
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