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Topic: Oil sheen (6 msgs / 102 lines)
1) From: Shauna Ellison
Thanks in advance for guidance.
What am I doing wrong?  I am new to roasting...about 2 months.  I have 
roasted several different types of green beans, but never seem to get that 
nice oil sheen that I get on the beans from my grocer.  After my beans have 
rested about 24 hours I see a few spots of oil, but never an even sheen.
  Thanks-Shauna Ellison

2) From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Bob=20Cassinelli?=
What type of roaster?
 
 Shauna Ellison wrote:
Thanks in advance for guidance.
What am I doing wrong?  I am new to roasting...about 2 months.  I have roasted several different types of green beans, but never seem to get that nice oil sheen that I get on the beans from my grocer.  After my beans have rested about 24 hours I see a few spots of oil, but never an even sheen.
 Thanks-Shauna Ellison 
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3) From: Al Raden
Sounds like you may not be roasting them long enough, or your roaster 
doesn't get hot enough.  It takes a pretty dark roast - well into second 
crack, to get an oily sheen.  To get to that point, my thermometer 
usually shows about 460 - 465 degrees F.  
Thought it was funny that you'd write about the lack of an oily sheen, 
when you email address is from midland.oilfield.slb.com
Shauna Ellison wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
- Al Raden
 http://www.brandydesigns.com

4) From: Ben Silva
Shauan,
When I first began roasting, I too had the same problem-- not being able to
get any oil to appear on the beans.  I realized the error of my ways when
one day I decided to let a roast go for about 15 minutes, just so I would be
able to witness all the different stages.  In the end, I found out that it
just takes longer than one may think for the oil to appear, but it certainly
will.  But remember, an oily bean isn't necessarily a good bean.  The peak
of flavor is really a City (medium) roast to Full City Roast-- this, of
course, depending on the type of bean and your own personal tastes.  Most
commercially roasted coffees, namely Starbucks (or Charbucks), tend to roast
their coffee to the point of obliteration which is, to some, the point in
which you'll start getting those really oily beans.
I hope this helped a little.  Happy roasting,
Ben

5) From: Gary Zimmerman
Shauna Ellison wrote:
<Snip>
I think you need to roast fairly dark, (the beans, I mean - not as in 
"roast during the night" :)  But also, sometimes it takes a few days for 
the oil patches to spread and cover the beans.  The beans at your grocer 
are likely post-roast by several days or weeks.
-- garyZ
WhirleyPop-drip(paper)-black
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: Ken Mary
I believe that you need a very hot roaster like the original Freshroast or a
modified popper. In a previous post (Aug 23) I described a very fast roast
that reached second crack in 2.6 minutes. The beans were glossy without any
oil droplets when they were dumped after cooling. After several days in a
jar the glossy coating returned. There were tiny spots of oil on the glass
and on the beans, but nothing like the flood of oil when roasted slower but
darker.
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