HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Newbie List Member (16 msgs / 439 lines)
1) From: Billy Bump
Howdy folks. 
My name is Bill, and I'm new to this great list.  I've been roasting since February.  I can see with my limited time roasting that there is so much to learn, I'd say even a lifetime of roasting, tasting, and reading left to do, and even then I will not know as much as many of you. 
But it will be a tasty journey. 
I live and work in Vancouver, Washington, but I originally came from the San Francisco Bay Area 30 years ago (I'm 49 now). 
I plan on going to the North American Specialty Coffee and Beverage Retailers' Expo (NASCORE) in Portland, Oregon, Sept. 20-22, 2002. Hopefully, I'll acquire some good information there. 
I have a confession.  At work I drink Yuban, and I like it.  Please don't shun me. 
Bill MacKay
Vancouver, Washington
---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! News - Today's headlines

2) From: C. Marley
Billy Bump wrote:
<Snip>
You do realize, do you not, Bill, that with that unfortunate admission,
you have killed any chance you ever had of becoming a CSA member.
Regards, Cathy http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.lhasa-apso.orghomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Les & Becky
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Welcome Billy,
You live near one of the best contributors of the list, Mike M.!  Now, =
you need to get into the archives and learn about CSA!  One suggestion =
for work.  You need to get a French Press and handgrinder.  Brew up a =
nice homeroast and drive the office crazy with the great smelling =
coffee.  I am at the point of closing my office door if I need addition =
coffee at work.  I don't run a coffee shop!
Les

4) From: Mike McGinness
From: "C. Marley" 
<Snip>
I'll come to Bill's defense. Still a definite CSA looong waiting period
before consideration though. Back to coming to Bill's defense (conditionally
that is.) I know Bill is another Hottop earlier adopter tester. If you're
willing to get together and play with your HotTop, comparing my variac
controlled Caffe' Rosto roasting, you might, just might, be considered for
CSA membership sooner ;-) I'd even supply the greens. (also live in
VanWa...)
BTW, I fairly certain NASCORE will be mostly vendors trying to 'hock their
wares' to coffee related business but it could be interesting. Entertaining
anyway. For $12 advance online registration what the heck, just may go!http://www.nascore.net/Forget the $25 at the door though. I'll run it by my
better half and see if she wants to go. What day(s) do you plan on going
Bill?
MM;-)
Home Ju-Ju Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: John Abbott
Howdy Bill,
Welcome to the list (I'm posting late because of Jury Duty)!
I was about to tip my hat to you for your wisdom in moving to Vancouver
and entry into the roasting world - but then you had to go and do that
Yuban (not buy in reverse) thing... and ... well... Just don't tell
people and you'll be OK.
John
On Tue, 2002-09-17 at 13:20, Billy Bump wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: R.N.Kyle
welcome Billy, don't let them bully you Billy, just cause you like =
Yuban, you are a brave man admitting to that, I would never admit to =
sorting like that.even it was true.  Let the bashing begin. all in fun =
of course
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

7) From: Justin Marquez
Hi - I am a new list member and I am about to embark upon the home roasting 
adventure.  Let me briefly introduce myself - I live in Snyder, TX which is 
about halfway between Abilene and Lubbock, TX.  90 miles from the nearest 
Lowes, Home Depot, Circuit City or Starbucks. (I bet you all thought there 
was NOWHERE in the USA 90 miles from a Starbucks, right?)  So, you can see 
why I need to roast my own!
I have a small order of the green beans from Sweet Marias and I am awaiting 
arrival of an EBay-purchased WearEver Popcorn Pumper.  Does anyone have any 
hints on where to start with the roasting time?  I think it is a 1400 watt 
widget.
I had already thought of the heat gun idea that I've seen mentioned here.  
With a heat gun, it seems to me that you have something already _designed_ 
for the long-term heating operation, but a popcorn popper probably isn't 
really a long-life item when used as a roaster.  Does anyone have any photos 
or a website of how to best apply a heat gun to the roasting operation?  Do 
you build a roasting chamber for the beans or what?  Do the beans need 
stirring during the roasting, or is the air velocity enough to distribute 
the heat properly? On a heat gun with variable temp settings, what temp to 
use for roasting?
Any help for this poor newbie would be greatly appreciated!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music,
Justin Marquez
(Snyder, TX)

8) From: Tom Ulmer
hi there justin-
i've driven through snyder while adventuring with a girlfriend who was going
to school in san angelo. you indeed live in b.f.e.
another method of roasting worth investigating is the whirlypop.

9) From: Lesley Albjerg
Welcome Justin!
 
I used to live in John Day, Oregon.  We were 150 miles from anything.  I remember fondly taking my wife out to eat at Red Lobster in Boise, ID.  It was only 320 miles round trip to go out to dinner that night!
 
Les
Justin Marquez  wrote:
Hi - I am a new list member and I am about to embark upon the home roasting 
adventure. Let me briefly introduce myself - I live in Snyder, TX which is 
about halfway between Abilene and Lubbock, TX. 90 miles from the nearest 
Lowes, Home Depot, Circuit City or Starbucks. (I bet you all thought there 
was NOWHERE in the USA 90 miles from a Starbucks, right?) So, you can see 
why I need to roast my own!
I have a small order of the green beans from Sweet Marias and I am awaiting 
arrival of an EBay-purchased WearEver Popcorn Pumper. Does anyone have any 
hints on where to start with the roasting time? I think it is a 1400 watt 
widget.
I had already thought of the heat gun idea that I've seen mentioned here. 
With a heat gun, it seems to me that you have something already _designed_ 
for the long-term heating operation, but a popcorn popper probably isn't 
really a long-life item when used as a roaster. Does anyone have any photos 
or a website of how to best apply a heat gun to the roasting operation? Do 
you build a roasting chamber for the beans or what? Do the beans need 
stirring during the roasting, or is the air velocity enough to distribute 
the heat properly? On a heat gun with variable temp settings, what temp to 
use for roasting?
Any help for this poor newbie would be greatly appreciated!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music,
Justin Marquez
(Snyder, TX)

10) From: Dennis Parham
Justin.... I know this wont help but here is goes...lol where I am in 
Oklahoma temporarily, I am about 150 miles from any starbucks!!!  home 
depot, Lowes, Circuit City! lol  anyway, there are many guys here using 
the Dog Bowl so Im sure you will get alot of help!!  good luck!
Dennis Parham
On Sep 27, 2004, at 9:31 AM, Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Dennis Parham
oops... didn't read it all...lol  I and many of the  coffee roasting 
community have used their poppery and popery for YEARS!!  they dont 
have to be high tech to work... and I think the Popcorn Pumper has a 
little better parts if I remember correctly... however... for me... 
when I first started... just roast and listen... the MOST important 
thing when starting out is HEARING and SEEING the beans roast...  some 
beans LOOK darker and roast different times so a standard time for 
every bean is not recommended ...  listen for it to start popping 2-4 
mins usually... keep an eye on it.. after that stops.... there should 
be a few mins 2-5 with no popping ( could be a stray or so if first 
crack happened too fast.) then you should hear a snip or snap of 2nd 
crack and dump and cool.... that is a VERY simple way to view the 
process... and keep eye on beans.. if they start to look oily you have 
gone to french roast! and 1 small step after you get fire!... I just 
look for a nice milk chocolate to dark look while still dry with an 
even color....and a pop into 2nd..( as a general rule... some beans I 
like at different levels of course.... but all that will come later as 
your skills and palate improve...  so..if you start with this... you 
will have many if not all successful roasts!... if they get too hot and 
turn oily very fast... add less beans.... I would check out Sweet 
marias site for some hints and tips and also a few other sites from our 
other fellow roasters here!
Dennis Parham
On Sep 27, 2004, at 9:31 AM, Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Justin,
       I know where you are.   Back in '64 I hauled drill stem down 84 
through that part of the country.   My wife was born in Littlefield.   
On coffee, you might look into the heat gun approach.  My heat gun is a 
general tool that also roasts coffee.   I use a wok instead of a dog 
bowl.
        Jim Gundlach
On Sep 27, 2004, at 9:31 AM, Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: HeatGunRoast heatgunroast
On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 09:31:18 -0500, Justin Marquez
 wrote:
<Snip>
Here's Michael Lloyd's HeatGun DogBowl Primer posted on Ed Needham's
HomeRoaster website (but not listed in his index?).  A good overview.http://www.homeroaster.com/heatgun.htmlHere's a link to first-ever HG/DB pics posted- - -now almost 2 yrs
old.  Plenty of opportunity to make this complicated if you're
inclined, but, IMO, the more I learn, the more I stick with the
basics.http://www.pbase.com/mnl/dog_bowl_heat_gun_coffee_roastingAns. to the Q's above:
The dogbowl is the "chamber."  About any bowl that doesn't melt will
do, but the dogbowls pictured offer, IMO, distinct advantages. 
Different sized bowls (32, 64, 96oz) are good for different size
batches of roast.
Stir constantly while "wanding" the HG.  I like the stick end of a
large wooden spoon.
Some disadvantages to using airflow to stir beans.  This is a 2-handed task.
Adjusting variable temps are a bother, but "better" HGs often come
with it anyway.  I leave on highest setting and control temp by
distance from the beans.  You get enough sensory feedback so that the
data bounces from your spinal cord back to your hands without ever
reaching your brain.     #:o)
Martin

14) From: Justin Marquez
Thanks to all for the helpful info and the links!  I may try the 
heatgun/dogbowl roaster process just because I like the idea of hands-on 
control of the process. (hey, a heat gun in the stable of tools ain't a bad 
idea anyway, and we already have a dog...)
(Yes - Snyder is indeed BFE. We actually live 6 miles or so OUTSIDE of 
Snyder.)
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music,
Justin Marquez
(Snyder, TX)
From: HeatGunRoast heatgunroast 
Reply-To: homeroast
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Newbie List Member
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 2004 11:40:05 -0700
On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 09:31:18 -0500, Justin Marquez
 wrote:
 > Hi - I am a new list member and I am about to embark upon the home 
roasting
 > adventure.  >
 > Does anyone have any photos
 > or a website of how to best apply a heat gun to the roasting operation?  
Do
 > you build a roasting chamber for the beans or what?  Do the beans need
 > stirring during the roasting, or is the air velocity enough to distribute
 > the heat properly? On a heat gun with variable temp settings, what temp 
to
 > use for roasting?
 >
 > Any help for this poor newbie would be greatly appreciated!
Here's Michael Lloyd's HeatGun DogBowl Primer posted on Ed Needham's
HomeRoaster website (but not listed in his index?).  A good overview.http://www.homeroaster.com/heatgun.htmlHere's a link to first-ever HG/DB pics posted- - -now almost 2 yrs
old.  Plenty of opportunity to make this complicated if you're
inclined, but, IMO, the more I learn, the more I stick with the
basics.http://www.pbase.com/mnl/dog_bowl_heat_gun_coffee_roasting

15) From: Angelo
Jim,
Do you use a flat or round-bottom wok?
Angelo
<Snip>

16) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Angelo,
Round,   I've always preferred them to flat  bottoms.
        Jim
On Sep 28, 2004, at 4:19 PM, Angelo wrote:
<Snip>


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