HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Krups Gusto (41 msgs / 997 lines)
1) From: C. Marley
Anybody actually used the Krups Gusto machine.  I got the last one at a
local store at a good price.  The Cappuchino I made was really very nice
- better than anything I have had anywhere else.  The frother worked
especially well!  This is the only machine I could squeeze onto my
limited counter top on which coffee paraphanalia has already displaced
every appliance but the food processor.  I had a mere 8 inches left, and
the Krups fit.  I'm sure the espresso will not be up to CSA standards,
but until I buy a new house . . . . 
Regards, Cathy
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2) From: Jim Schulman
Congratulations, the Krups Gusto is regarded as the champion in the small, low cost espresso 
division, and with proper feeding will deliver a shot as good as those of bigger and more 
expensive machines.
Moreover, Krups in accordance with their long standing policy of cancelling any product they 
make that actually works well, has discontinued this machine, and will most likely replace 
it by yet another wretched crema-enhanced, froth-enhanced, thermoblock loser.
On 18 Sep 2002 at 21:53, C. Marley wrote:
<Snip>
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3) From: EskWIRED
 This is the only machine I could squeeze onto my
<Snip>
A true blue CSAer would knock down a wall and extend the counter into the
living room...
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4) From: Kevin DuPre
I actually bought one of these about a month ago
because it was a truly pump driven machine with a
boiler.  I scrapped the instructions about their
tamping recommendations and after modifying my
DeLonghi grinder (see previous  post about "packing
tape shims") to produce the proper grind I use a
Starbucks convex tamper to pack the double shot filter
screen with 2 7-gram measures. I find that you really
have to lean into the tamp to get the proper
extraction otherwise that 15 bar pump finds the first
weakness in the pack and channels all the water
through it.
On a double shot pull I get nearly 1/4" of thick
reddish crema with a variety of blends and the
espresso is quite respectable considering that the
machine retails for around $100 but I got mine for $50
at Great Indoors because "nobody wants gray anymore -
black is the rave now".
I've made latte's and capps for friends who claim they
haven't tasted better anywhere else (including the
mostly inconsistent chains). Of course I cheated by
using my home-roasted blends only a day out of the
roaster!
The machine can be a little messy if you're processing
multiple shots in a row with no capp or latte foaming
the steaming of which tends to dry out the grounds in
the portafilter somewhat before dumping. If you can
get past that, it's a great machine for the money.  I
previously had a Salton steam "toy" that my wife got
for me one Christmas because neither of us at the time
knew any different. I only came to know better because
of the research I did considering opening my own shop
(which I've since abandoned the idea of due to the
lack of net profit from such a venture).  It [the
Salton] is now part of the standard fare of our camper
along with the Braun burr grinder.  Who knows, maybe
we can sell espresso out of the camper at 10,000 feet
in the Rockies or at 6000 in the Appalachians to those
who can't find a better cup elsewhere :)
<Snip>
=====
--
Kevin DuPre
obxwindsurfhttp://profiles.yahoo.com/obxwindsurf"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes -- Marcel Proust"
Do you Yahoo!?
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5) From: R.N.Kyle
Kevin wrote this in reply to Cathy's post on the Gusto
I actually bought one of these about a month ago
because it was a truly pump driven machine with a
boiler.  
thanks Kevin I have one of these machines in transit, hope to get this =
week. You and a few other list members rated it high enough ( for a =
budget espresso machine) that I bought it off Amazon on for 59 and free =
shipping.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

6) From:
Amazon.com has them for $59.95 with free shipping. I just ordered one, this is
my induction into the dark world of espresso.
Marc
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7) From: Angelo
Cathy,
I have... I picked up a "new" one (obviously not used) for $12 in a thrift 
shop. (How could I say ,"no"?)
It made a quite nice espresso. As I have a Silvia, I will probably give it 
as a gift to a deserving coffee acolyte.
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>
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8) From: Dan Bollinger
Kewl!  Maybe I'll get started with you.  They have reconditioned ones for
$29.95http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00005O0MG/qid32444260/sr=8-2/ref=sr_8_2/002-1650631-0464810?v=glance&s=home-garden&nP7846
<Snip>
this is
<Snip>
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9) From:
Now you got me upset, I didn't see the reconditioned ones.
<Snip>
<Snip>
this is
<Snip>
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10) From: Ben Treichel
Dan you got me all excited, and there are none in stock!  :-(  Shame on 
you! :-)
I figured at that price my wife wouldn't shout at me; too badly.
Ben
Dan Bollinger wrote:
<Snip>
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11) From: Ben Treichel
You need to paste the link together, its on two lines.
However, they are out of stock!.
marc wrote:
<Snip>
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12) From: Acorn54
i am the happy owner of a krups gusto that i got a year ago from 
overstock.com .
i also purchased a zassenhaus mill a good low cost entry into the espresso 
world.
i roast my own beans in hearthware gourmet (over 600 roasts). with this set 
up my espresso is just fine. i don't have a more upscale espresso machine to 
compare to but from the posts it seems the gusto does a good job in making a 
good espresso-guy from long island
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13) From: R.N.Kyle
Me to I didn't know they had reconditioned ones for 30 and I got one =
coming that I paid 60 for. Dangit, oh well at least I got one coming.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

14) From: R.N.Kyle
All this good talk about the Gusto, I can't wait to get mind, it should =
be at the door tomorrow, or Monday at the latest.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

15) From: Acorn54
there is no need to go with a $200 dollar electric grinder. you can use a 
zassenhaus mill. i use one with my gusto machine and it works fine. i have 
found these grinders at good prices on ebay. apparantly the fact that they 
are manual gives them low demand but it only takes about 35 seconds to grind 
enough coffee for a double. by the way use the double shot filter not the 
single shot, you'll get better results-guy from long island
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16) From: R.N.Kyle
Thank you for your post, I hadn't thought about a hand grinder, I'm not =
against manual labor, and the price will fit my limited budget. Thanks
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

17) From: jim gundlach
On Monday, September 23, 2002, at 09:53 PM, Acorn54 wrote:
<Snip>
I've been using my old Zass for more than three weeks now while I have 
been going through a failed attempt to fix my old Solis 166 and a so far 
futile attempt to get FedEx to deliver my Rocky.  I grind enough for 
twelve to fifteen doubles a day and while I am glad to have it as an 
emergency grinder, the chore substantially detracts from the pleasure of 
coffee.
Jim Gundlach
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18) From: R.N.Kyle
I agree Jim, it is nice to push a button and have a grind ready in a =
couple of seconds, verses grinding by hand. I think it is kinda =
pioneering to use a hand crank, and although tougher then pushing a =
button, has a certain appeal. Mind you now I haven't tried the hand =
crank grinder yet, just said it seems to have a rustic and pioneering =
appeal
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

19) From:
My Gusto is supposed to arrive tomorrow per the UPS tracking system. I plan to
follow Tom's advice and pick up a can of Illy coffee after work today. I quote
from the Espresso Equipment page "I strongly recommend that anyone starting out
on a new espresso machine (or just learning to produce espresso on any other
machine) use good pre-ground espresso. Why? Because grind is such a huge
variable in good espresso extraction. While you are learning the mechanics of
the machine, eliminate this unknown factor by using a top quality pre-ground
coffee. Illy espresso is probably the most respected Italian espresso brand in
the world, a reputation earned by Ernesto Illy and sons for their work at the
forefront of defining coffee quality." 
I also hope that it will provide a "gold standard" for me to compare my homeroast.
Marc
EuropaChris (Chris Beck) etched in electrons:
<Snip>
flat >burr grinders are fine for drip, but horrible for espresso.  THe dust
created >overextracts and gives the bitterness.  Even a good but worn grinder
(my older >Solis 166) was giving really bitter, harsh shots from my Silvia.  The
Rocky made >all that go away!
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20) From: R.N.Kyle
Dang Mark That seems to be a good Idea for getting an idea about the =
correct grind and taste for Italian Espresso. Sometime I try to =
complicate things, an overlook the simple solution thanks
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

21) From: EuropaChris
Beware, however, that Illy or Lavazza pre-ground is usually ground for moka pot use and is too coarse for a 'decent' pump espresso maker.  You MAY get underextracted, watery, fast shots with it.
All I can say is try it out and see what happens.  I'll say this, Lavazza pre-ground is wonderful in a moka pot.  
Chris
"R.N.Kyle"  wrote:
<Snip>
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22) From: jim gundlach
On Tuesday, September 24, 2002, at 09:26 AM,  wrote:
<Snip>
The Illy is a good espresso blend and it is ground perfectly.  However, 
it is not fresh and almost all of Tom's beans are better coffee than 
they can get for their relatively small mass market.  Look at the Illy 
as a learning tool, not a standard to live down to.
Jim Gundlach
still waiting for FedEx to deliver the Rocky
in La Place, Alabama
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23) From: R.N.Kyle
Good point Jim, You know straight up that pre-packaged coffee be it =
regular or espresso is going to stale, compared to Tom's beans fresh =
roasted at home. It will be a good learning tool, I bought some today, =
named Cafe' Pilon, produced by Rowland Coffee Roasters, Inc. out of =
Miami, Fl. I could not find any Illy at the stores in my area. I tried =
it and cupped it to some of my fresh roasted, and it was bad, even =
though I thought they both were bitter my home roast tasted better and =
not nearly as bitter. but I was able to adjust my grinder to get the =
right grind. I used a magnifying glass and a side by side comparison. =
I'll keep on trying and hope I will get it right with this espresso =
method of brewing coffee. I guess no one gets it in just 4 days.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

24) From: Ed Needham
With the Illy coffee you will see a 'perfect' grind.  It may not be perfect
for your machine for that particular day, but you'll be hard pressed to find
a more even, dustless grind.  Definitely a benchmark for quality grinding.
To my taste, Illy is a really tasty espresso blend.  It could only be made
better if it was roasted fresh, ground on the spot with a high quality
grinder and 'dialed in' specifically to your machine.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

25) From: R.N.Kyle
Just a good starting point Ed off to work
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

26) From:
I don't know what you guys mean that it's not fresh. The can I bought yesterday
at Williams-Sonoma doesn't expire until 2004 :-)
Marc
Quoting Ed Needham" 

27) From: R.N.Kyle
Marc wrote
Hey Marc.  Anything that has been cooked, or roasted, I don't know what =
you guys mean that it's not fresh. The can I bought yesterday
at Williams-Sonoma doesn't expire until 2004 :-)
 Canned will never be as fresh, as when you take the fresh item this in =
case the green beans and roast them at home and consume then shortly =
thereafter. 
Fresh always taste better then canned. Example fresh green beans cooked =
and consumed will always taste better then canned green beans, the same =
with coffee.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle
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28) From: Spencer W. Thomas
I took advantage of the Amazon clearance of the Krups Gusto.  I'm 
"upgrading" from an old Novo Compact.  I had already had to disassemble 
the Novo Compact to fix the steam switch once, so I figured it was 
nearing the end of its useful lifetime and I was already looking for a 
replacement. I had thought to really upgrade to something in the $300 
range, but couldn't shake loose the cash anytime soon.  I mostly use it 
to make a "capp" in the morning, occasionally I do an espresso shot in 
the afternoon or an iced Americano.
My comments, in no particular order:
    * It's smaller and significantly lighter than the Novo.  It feels,
      therefore, "cheaper," but I don't know if it really is.
    * The rounded styling means I can't stack the "parts" on top of the
      machine when I'm not using it.
    * It heats up a lot faster than the Novo did.
    * The steam is hot and plentiful for such a small unit.  I still
      frequently overheat my milk because I'm not used to how fast it
      works. I like the steam a lot better.
    * The shot appears to run very similarly to the Novo.  I haven't had
      to change my grind ("1.5" on an unmodified Solis 177) or tamping
      practice.  I routinely get nice crema, ranging from 100% crema
      with freshly roasted beans to about 25% after 5 days.
    * I've only done one straight espresso shot since I got it.  It was
      good, certainly better than I've ever gotten from *$ (but that's
      not hard!) Never having experienced a "God shot," I have no idea
      how far off I am from the ideal.
In short, the Gusto is very definitely worth the $60 I paid for it ($10 
more than the reconditioned Novo cost me 3 or 4 years ago).
=Spencer Thomas in Ann Arbor, MI
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29) From: R.N.Kyle
Hello Spencer, I to have recently acquired a Gusto. It is a real nice =
inexpensive Espresso machine.  I store it in a Coffee Cabinet, and lay =
the extras on the flat drip tray. The only fault I have is the boiler is =
to small, and can only do 4 oz. at a time, then you have to wait until =
it heats up again. I like to make Americano's . But although it doesn't =
have all the bells and whistles. Dollar for Dollar it packs a real good =
punch. Have fun
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

30) From: Angelo
Ron,
I have a Sylvia and also make Americano's. However, I heat up the water for 
the Americanos in a small kettle and pour it in afterwards. I really don't 
like the idea of drinking the water from the steam wand. Doing it in this 
manner you would not have to wait for the water to heat up  and you would 
enjoy the Gusto more ...:-)
Ciao,
Angelo
Snip...
<Snip>
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31) From: R.N.Kyle
Thanks Angelo I do believe that would make things easier.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

32) From: Mike McGinness
Hotwater on demand works great for Americanos too...:-) Also for pre-heating
cups & rinsing portafilter without cooling it down.
MM;-)
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA

33) From: R.N.Kyle
Thanks Mike, not only will it make life easier, it will be less strain =
on the Gusto. I pulled a shot tonight, 1.5 oz. added some sugar, thought =
it was great, just a mouthful of flavor, great body, and wonderful =
aftertaste. I still had a 1/2 cup of drip brew, CRT, and it was good , =
but after the shot, I finished the CRT, and thought this is really thin =
with little body kinda like coffee water, I guess the shot was so =
concentrated, and drinking the Drip brew shortly after, it just didn't =
compare.  I may be hooked.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

34) From: Mike McGinness
From: "R.N.Kyle" 
<Snip>
the Gusto. I pulled a shot tonight, 1.5 oz. added some sugar, thought it was
great, just a mouthful of flavor, great body, and wonderful aftertaste. I
still had a 1/2 cup of drip brew, CRT, and it was good , but after the shot,
I finished the CRT, and thought this is really thin with little body kinda
like coffee water, I guess the shot was so concentrated, and drinking the
Drip brew shortly after, it just didn't compare.  I may be hooked.
Yeah, I learned that drinking order some time ago too.  If tasting different
brewing methods straight shot last! I've try to remember that for company
too.
Ron, BTW, your two espresso blend roast samples arrived today. I didn't have
a chance to try them yet. Also, I'll get a fresh roast Songbird control in
the mail in a couple days, next Monday latest.
MM;-)
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
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35) From: R.N.Kyle
Thanks Mike,  I have developed another one off of the first two, with =
more Celebes, to add more body, I thought the blends were a bit bright =
and weak in body??. looking forward to the SB to compare the storage SB
Off to work
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

36) From: Samuel Gaxiola
Ron Kyle Anderson wrote:
Thanks Mike, not only will it make life easier, it will be less strain =
on the Gusto. I pulled a shot tonight, 1.5 oz. added some sugar, thought
=
it was great, just a mouthful of flavor, great body, and wonderful =
aftertaste. I still had a 1/2 cup of drip brew, CRT, and it was good , =
but after the shot, I finished the CRT, and thought this is really thin
=
with little body kinda like coffee water, I guess the shot was so =
Concentrated, and drinking the Drip brew shortly after, it just didn't =
Compare.  I may be hooked.
Ron: what kind of grinder do you have?, I got a Krups Gusto too but I
only have a cheap burr grinder that I got from hearthware, I have only
used the drip brew and French press methods so far, This will be my
first experience with espresso, I know that grinding is very important
for a good shot of espresso, but $ 200.00 plus dollars for a grinder its
not possible for me now. I am thinking about the Maestro grinder but
from what I been reading from the list, it will start giving problems in
a year or so, what about a Zassenhaus coffee mill? I know they are
manual but I also know that they can grind very fine? Any experience
with this? Any of you in the list.
Samuel Gaxiola
Roasting in northwest Mexico.
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37) From: Ben Treichel
Samuel Gaxiola wrote:
<Snip>
Zass mills are excellent! And Ken Davids in his books lists the Zass as 
the only manual mill capable of grinding for expresso.
I can't swear to how much work it is to get an expresso grind, but I can 
tell you that the drip grind I use for my press pot takes about 30 turns 
(14 grams). However, don't expect to be able to switch the grind back 
and forth easily. There are no marked spots, or locks on the adjustor. 
It is adjusted by sound and feel (S&M have excellent directions), so to 
get proficent at switching grinds will take some experience.
I think Ron Kyle used a Zass until he got his Rocky.
<Snip>

38) From: James Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-2-64789758
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On Wednesday, October 9, 2002, at 01:47 PM, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>
I use a Zass as a back-up grinder.   I  grind enough for seven doubles 
before I leave the house around 7:00 in the morning and then enough for 
another five or six in the early evening.  I got very tired of it 
during the four weeks between when my Solis 166 died and I finally got 
the Rocky.  It does grind fine enough for espresso.
Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-2-64789758
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
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On Wednesday, October 9, 2002, at 01:47 PM, Ben Treichel wrote:
Zass mills are excellent! And Ken Davids in his books lists
the Zass as the only manual mill capable of grinding for expresso.
I can't swear to how much work it is to get an expresso grind, but I
can tell you that the drip grind I use for my press pot takes about 30
turns (14 grams). However, don't expect to be able
to switch the grind back and forth easily. There are no marked spots,
or locks on the adjustor. It is adjusted by sound and feel (S&M have
excellent directions), so to get proficent at switching grinds will
take some experience.
I use a Zass as a back-up grinder.   I  grind enough for seven doubles
before I leave the house around 7:00 in the morning and then enough
for another five or six in the early evening.  I got very tired of it
during the four weeks between when my Solis 166 died and I finally got
the Rocky.  It does grind fine enough for espresso.
Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-2-64789758--
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39) From: R.N.Kyle
Hey Samuel, no I don't have a very good grinder, just a budget flat =
burr, but I bought some preground espresso in a can from Illy, to get an =
idea for the texture of the grind. and adjusted my grinder to suit. It =
is the weak link in my Espresso chain, but I keep trying, and once in a =
while I hit on a good shot. This keeps me plugging away until I can =
afford a Rocky on equal or better caliper grinder. The Zassenhaus coffee =
mill?  Is a very good conical burr grinder with a 10 yr guarantee. and =
there are quite a few on this list that use them with good results, I'm =
just a little lazy and would rather push a button instead of turning the =
crank.  Good Luck And keep trying.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

40) From: R.N.Kyle
<Snip>
No but I wish I did have a Rocky, It is on my wish list. mabey for =
Christmas, I grind with a cheap flat burr grinder bought form QVC called =
a cooks essentials. It is the weakest link in my Espresso chain. but =
until thinks get better it will have to do.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

41) From: Acorn54
i use the zassenhaus coffee mill with my gusto. does a fine job. get loads  
of crema and 25 second shots. i bought the knee model as it seems alot easier 
to grind when you can put the mill between your legs. it takes about 35 
seconds of grinding to get enough coffee grinds for a double.-guy from long 
island
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