HomeRoast Digest


Topic: A fictional color tile (31 lines)
1) From: James Gundlach
All this talk about color tiles and chips reminds me of a piece of 
fiction I am working on that addressed the problem in a different and 
fictional manner.  In reality, Dr. James Boyd was one of the founders of 
La Place, Alabama.  He received the land patent for the land I now live 
on back in 1837 and built our house in 1840.  The 1850 census reports 
that he owned 93 slaves.  Our bedroom was his medical office and it was 
the first western medical establishment in this part of the country.  
More people have probably died in our bedroom and any other place in 
this area.  In my piece of fiction, which I doubt I will ever finish,  
the following events take place.
  Dr. Boyd takes a river boat  trip to New Orleans to buy coffee.  He 
picks up several samples from the warehouses and spends the next ten 
days roasting and sampling.  After he has selected and bought his 
coffee, and made an enemy who may or may not kill him, he takes a few 
perfectly roasted beans to the slave auction.  There he examines the 
young females and compares the beans with the color of their skin where 
it has not been darkened by the sun.  He finds a perfect match in a girl 
about twelve years old and buys her.  He tells her that her job is to 
roast coffee to match that part of her skin and that she must never 
expose it to the sun.  He names her Koffee.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
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HomeRoast Digest