HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Maestro Deconstruction (18 msgs / 360 lines)
1) From: Rick Farris
I was watching TV last night and Sears had an ad for a sale on their "Big
Shark" 1000W Dustbuster-like hand vacuum.  I've been wanting to disassemble
and clean my Solis Maestro grinder, so I went down this morning and bought
one.
I'll tell you what, that thing is powerful.  I took the top off my Mazzer
grinder (which I've been using for drip until I can clean out my Maestro),
and I barely got it near the grinder before it sucked out all the dust in
the doser!
My problem is that I can't figure out how to get the Maestro apart.  Has
anyone done so?
I removed the bean hopper, but I can't see any way in from the top.  Looking
at the bottom, it looks like maybe there are some tabs along the bottom edge
to pry at, but it's not obvious which way the cover would move to remove it.
Up?  Down?
Any help out there?
--Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Rick Farris" 
 My problem is that I can't figure out how to get the Maestro apart.
Has
<Snip>
Looking
<Snip>
edge
<Snip>
it.
<Snip>
Remove hopper, upper burr, bin and timer dial. It pulls straight off, I had
to use pliers (teeth covered by towel.) The four tabs on the bottom are
indeed what holds the cover on. Supposedly, per Barratza, one should be able
to just firmly push to release the tabs. Not me (and I've been fighting
similar snap together plastic stuff on printers and laptops for many years.)
I used a flat blade screwdriver to gentle pry, small amounts at a time,
working from one point to the next. Once past the four snap points (much
heavier and less apt to break than those on printers and laptops btw) the
cover lifts straight up and off.
Good luck!
MM;-)
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Rick Farris
Mike wrote:
<Snip>
Yeah.  And especially don't forget the timer dial. :-)
I got it apart and found that one of the upper "feeder" teeth in the upper
burr assembly had what looked like metal "flashing" on it.  I know it
wasn't, because my Maestro used to work great, and suddenly developed a lot
of coffee dust, so I'm assuming some kind of event.
I filed the burrs off of the burr and reassembled, but I still have a lot of
coffee dust.  I wonder if the lower burr assembly is home-replaceable?
--Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Rick Farris" 
 coffee dust.  I wonder if the lower burr assembly is
home-replaceable?
I seem to recall someone mentioning it was 'permanently attached' to the
motor. Maybe not. I haven't checked with Barratza to verify. I had mine
apart to put a mounting bushing and screw back in place...
MM;-)
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: C. Marley
Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
Rick, you turn the hopper all the way counterclockwise - as far as it
will go and pull off the hopper.  Then grasp the teflon part which
contains the top burr, and lift it straight out.  You can then get to
the lower burrs to clean them. To reassemble, put the burr back where it
came from, settle it down in, and replace the hopper, and dial up the
grind you want again.
-- 
For the conservation of the Tibetan Lhasa Apso,
Regards, Cathy http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.lhasa-apso.orghomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: jim gundlach
Assuming the Maestro has the same construction as the Solis 166, I have 
completely disassembled and reassembled the 166.  They say the lower 
burr is not owner replaceable.  How ever, it does come apart.  The 
problem is that the shaft that holds it also holds the clutch gear which 
is a spring loaded sandwich like assembly that is waiting to "sprong!" 
apart.  Even if you don't  lose some of the parts, it is quite difficult 
to put back together.  I described it as a one item test for admission 
to engineering school.  When I went into my 166 I suspected burr damage  
but found the real problem was the plastic "fan?" that pushes the coffee 
out the chute.  Something that would cause  minor burr damage will 
usually take the blades off the plastic fan and the lower burr has to be 
removed to replace the fan.  By the time you replace both burrs and the 
plastic fan, you are looking at more than $60.00 if they will sell you 
the parts and you think you can do it.  If you have to ship both ways 
and pay labor, you are better off getting a new grinder.  I went ahead 
and got the Rocky.  It costs twice as much as the Maestro but it is ten 
times the machine.  It also grinds better than the Solis ever did.
      The Maestro is probably the least expensive grinder that will 
adequately grind for espresso, but  it is not built to last nor is it 
designed to be repaired.  If you expect to be into coffee for more than 
a couple of years, I would recommend moving up to a better grinder.  You 
won't regret it.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
On Saturday, September 28, 2002, at 05:44 PM, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: sho2go
The Rocky is a little rich for my blood, to be only an espresso grinder.
Anyone with any experience or recommendations for a good quality grinder for
both espresso and drip/FP/vac pot?
Mike

8) From: Mike McGinness
As a Maestro owner since December, and looking at grinder upgrading yet
again (three grinder purchases last year including the Maestro), there
doesn't seem any other choice. The Maestro does work for espresso, and
fairly well. But only fairly well especially after a couple months,
depending on usage of course. The grind isn't as even as it used to be. I'm
fairly certain the Rocky isn't limited to espresso grind range and have been
told the Mazzer Mini easily goes from espresso to Press and back no problem.
But yes, spendy...:-(  It's one of those pay once or pay over and over
things.
MM;-)
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
From: "sho2go" 
<Snip>
for
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

9) From: jim gundlach
On Saturday, September 28, 2002, at 07:50 PM, sho2go wrote:
<Snip>
The Rocky does a very nice even grind for all brewing methods from 
Turkish to French Press.  I resisted the recommendations of the Rocky 
fanatics until I found one listed on eBay that said it was located in 
Auburn while I was undergoing frustrations with getting the Solis 166 
fixed.  I assumed it was Auburn, Alabama so I thought I could get it 
quickly and save shipping costs.  I went a head and bid on it.   Then,  
it occurred to me that there were other Auburn's in the world.  I 
checked and it turned out to be in Auburn, California.  But now I have 
Rocky and the grind is absolutely wonderful.  The dosser could use some 
improvement but I have now joined the ranks of the Rocky fanatics.  I 
paid $192.50 including shipping for a barely used Rocky.  I paid about 
$130.00 for the Solis 166 which barely lasted two years.  I expect that 
the Rocky will be a part of my estate that the kids will fight over.
Jim Gundlach
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

10) From: jim gundlach
On Saturday, September 28, 2002, at 07:50 PM, sho2go wrote:
<Snip>
The Rocky does a very nice even grind for all brewing methods from 
Turkish to French Press.  I resisted the recommendations of the Rocky 
fanatics until I found one listed on eBay that said it was located in 
Auburn while I was undergoing frustrations with getting the Solis 166 
fixed.  I assumed it was Auburn, Alabama so I thought I could get it 
quickly and save shipping costs.  I went a head and bid on it.   Then,  
it occurred to me that there were other Auburn's in the world.  I 
checked and it turned out to be in Auburn, California.  But now I have 
Rocky and the grind is absolutely wonderful.  The dosser could use some 
improvement but I have now joined the ranks of the Rocky fanatics.  I 
paid $192.50 including shipping for a barely used Rocky.  I paid about 
$130.00 for the Solis 166 which barely lasted two years.  I expect that 
the Rocky will be a part of my estate that the kids will fight over.
Jim Gundlach
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

11) From: Ben Treichel
I love my hand cranked zass, but then I don't do express. About 30 turns 
to get 15 grams ground.
sho2go wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

12) From: sho2go
Thanks, Mike and Jim.  I was looking at a web site which sells several
grinders; to make a long story short they said the Rocky was specifically
for espresso.  If it will indeed do double duty, then I don't have any
problem spending the bucks.
Mike, Sunny San Diego

13) From: Rick Farris
Jim wrote:
<Snip>
I wondered what that thing was.  What was your symptom?  Mine was coffee
dust.  The grinder was only three months old when it began acting up.
And continued:
<Snip>
I have a *much* better grinder -- a Mazzer 'Moka' -- but I don't like
changing it back and forth from espresso to drip grinds.  I need a good
grinder for drip but haven't really found anything.  I know that the
midrange espresso grinders would work, (Rocky, Mazzer-Mini, Innova, etc) but
I don't want to hassle with the doser.
I was in a place today that had a grinder that looked sort of like a
KitchenAid stand mixer -- just a big ol' motor with a grinder on the front.
It was branded "Jericho."  I wonder where they come from and how much they
cost?
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: Rick Farris
Mike wrote:
<Snip>
I don't think such a beast exists, Mike.  I have a pretty good sized budget,
and I still can't find one.  The espresso grinders are pretty much
encumbered with dosers and portafilter guides, and such, which is a pain in
the neck for drip coffee.  They also take several shots to dial back in for
espresso once you've adjusted them for drip.
Most people recommend the Solis Maestro (~$130) for your application, but
several of the list members (including myself) have had inconsistent results
with it.
I wish I could find a good drip coffee grinder that wasn't the size of a
house like the ones in grocery stores.
--Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

15) From: Rick Farris
Mike said:
<Snip>
I don't think so.  I think it goes from espresso to drip easily, but I'm
betting that it will take you several shots to get it dialed back in for
espresso...  I mean, get real, espresso grinders need to be adjusted for
each varietal, for changes in the weather, and for changes in the roast...
But if I can't find my ideal drip grinder, I'm going to buy a Mini and use
it for espresso and use my Moka for drip.  If that happens, I'll experiment
with the Mini and let you know how it goes...  :-)
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

16) From: Chris Beck
<Snip>
Yeah, the Rocky!!!
I was hesitant to get the Rocky to replace my crapped out 166 because I 
thought the doser would be a hassle.  Well, it's not.  I just dose into 
a 1/2 cup measuring cup and then dump it into the vac pot, etc.  The 
Rocky is EASILY adjusted between espresso grind and vac pot or whatever, 
and usually you can go back to espresso settings and not waste a shot.
The Solis is a complete toy by comparison.  
Chris
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

17) From: jim gundlach
On Sunday, September 29, 2002, at 12:43 AM, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
The dust is a symptom of the burrs getting out of alignment which 
happens because the mounting system is inadequate.  As long as the burrs 
are sharp and in reasonable alignment, you should not get dust out of a 
burr grinder unless you grind for Turkish.  When the fan goes, the dust 
packs into the base of the grinder and you have to clean it out more 
frequently to get coffee.  Since this little plastic piece is not user 
replaceable, unless you are very handy, you can be without your grinder 
during  a UPS round-trip  to the west coast.  If it was user replaceable 
you could order the part when you started having to clean the grinder 
regularly, once it arrived you could replace the part and your coffee 
life would not be disrupted.
Jim Gundlach
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

18) From: TFisher511
I agree with Chris and others. I dose into an empty margarine dish and when 
it gets messy, pitch it and grab another. The Rocky does switch back and 
forth quickly and with precise repeatability. You just need to keep it clean.
Terry F
EuropaChris writes:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest