HomeRoast Digest


Topic: toronto still and again (3 msgs / 70 lines)
1) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Susan, thanks for the analysis.  I hadn't given it much thought, but it
sounds right on.  Last night I read a long article on the complexities of
'fair-trade' and 'fair-labor' coffee programs in a recent 'Fresh Cup'
magazine.  In essence, the giant roasters, like Folgers, Millstone and
Nestle are buying cheap coffee from Vietnam; non of which is 'fair trade'.
Only about 20% of beans from a fair-trade certified finca is sold at the
$1.36 per pound rate, the rest is being undercut by the current world
market. I know Tom tries to sell fair-trade beans, but this isn't always
possible and besides, his mission is to deliver the best beans in the world.
He talks about this at:http://www.sweetmarias.com/donations.html One thing
I'd like to see is an added field on his bean sheets where 'fair trade' can
be designated instead of burying this in the lengthy description. Given two
HueHues, I know I'd order more of the fair-trade coffees.  I see us
home-roasters as the vanguard of a mighty, economic movement to promoting
fair-trade coffees.  I want the option of making an informed decision.   Dan
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: susan oppenheim
well
I am thrilled with the responses I got by your reprinting of that e mail
letter quoting prices to me from the supplier of the HOTTOP in china.If
you are all surprised imagine how I felt-we have a 64 cent dollar here
in Canada.The british supplier lists at 399 pounds and my conversion
tells me that is 626$ US plus shipping.
I am entering your world here as a complete novice-nonscientific and
inexperienced.But I do have an eye for business and what my overview is
after a few weeks on your great web sites is that there are a lot of
manufacturers scrambling like mad right now to produce their  line of
home roasting equipment.The current events outlining recently on BBC and
CNN the horrendous markups that suffer the poor farmers and growers to
deliver "fresh roasted"to the shelves of first world -via the companies
that package this stuff-also would encourage environmentally and fare
trade friendly persons to naturally roast green.
SO
The future
somebody is going to make a lot of money here
the profits are in the distribution rights to the machines..........
thanks for the time
Susan oppenheim
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Tom & Maria
<Snip>
You know Dan, one of the markets that are REALLY exasperating the 
problem is Europe! Yes, those discriminating and conscientious folks 
are breaking the camels back: Commercial -grade roasters 
(non-specialty) in europe traditionally used middle grade arabicas 
from central america and that made your basic european cup quality 
better that average US coffee from a can or served at a diner. But it 
is the fact that the europeans have started substitutung with 
vietnamese and chinese coffee, arabica and robusta, and not buying 
these borderline specialty Centrals that has caused huge gluts in the 
market. Thats what has changed in the recent picture....
Brokers arent really the problem. In fact some pay minimum coffee 
prices on long term contracts well above fair trade levels for 
quality.  Big multinationals certainly are part of the problem, but 
this is one aspect that Starbucks separates themselves: they do for 
the most part buy good coffee, and they do pay good prices.
Tom
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