HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Cuban Coffee (65 msgs / 1458 lines)
1) From: sschurman
I picked up a pound of green Cuban coffee beans.  They appear to be very nicely
prepared, dry-processed beans.  I have only a pound, so I want to make the most
of it.  Do any list members have experience with Cuban beans?  To what other
coffees is it similar?  How darkly should I roast it?
Thanks,
Steve Schurman
Whirly-Pop
Rocky
Europiccola, Santos, Chambord

2) From: Ken Wilson
As i understand it, there aren't many people on this list allowed to have
them!
 but, yes, I have some.  The specific ones i have are dusky dry - like a
monsoon malabar without the flavour and body?  Or a "gin" dryness?  (This
description is bought to you from the "flap the hands around" school - not
the SCAA recommended descriptions :-)
I took em up to start of second crack.
Ken
England
-Do any list members have experience with Cuban beans?  To what other
<Snip>

3) From: Mandy Willison
I got em, I and smoked them
bean'wild!
<Snip>

4) From: Dave Clark
 So, let's say someone I know is going to London and wants to get some,
oh, let's say Cuban green beans and take them into, oh, the USA. Does 
the customs fellow *know* green coffee well enough to spot the Cuban 
beans vs  Monsooned Malabar? Is it worth it, is what my friend is 
wondering... ;op
Ken Wilson wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Dave Clark                                             Austin, Texashttp://www.jump.net/~davec                            N 30d 27.526m
mailto:davec                                  W 97d 48.826m
Time flies like the wind, and fruit flies like bananas.

5) From: Simpson
Like, Dude-
The narcs have specially trained Cuban-bean sniffing civet cats, dude! One
chick told me if you wrap up your beans in a baggie and bury it in a box
with some hashish those cats'll be thrown right off the scent.
But, man, those hashish sniffing dogs are a bummer, man...
Oh, and Dave's not here, man. He's down at the corner having an espresso,
dude.
What was the question...?

6) From: Bryce Decker
Folks, having just read Neal Stephenson's CRYTONOMICON, I am sensitive to
the kind of net  traffic that really oought to be encrypted.  There is an
appendix at the end of this splendid thriller that could make everyman a
cryptogrrapher.  Politically sensitive  contraband of the sort you propose
on this thread really oughtn't be discussed right out in the open like
this.

7) From: Simpson
You know, Bryce, it's fun-loving coffee drinkers like this group that will
bring those serious government types to the threshold of a sense of humor
and then drag them over to hilarity kicking and screaming...
We can do it...
Back OT: In the case of Cuban coffee our government has acted to keep us
from purchasing that product (we US of A members), but in most cases WE
control our buying decisions. Are there any coffees from any regions which
you avoid purchasing out of concern for inadvertently supporting a leader or
political system you wouldn't want to assist with your dollars?
If you want to answer that in code, what say we use a substitution code
where 'a' = 1 and 'b' = 2 and so on. Those feelthy feds will never catch on
then, you bet!
20-5-4

8) From: Angelo
<Snip>
encryption? :-)
I am sensitive to
<Snip>

9) From: Bryce Decker
Message text written by INTERNET:homeroast
<Snip>
encryption? :-)
I am sensitive to
<Snip>
propose
<Snip>
Let me see,  It is Coffea arabica or Cofea arabica?  This kind of finger
trouble on the keyboard and  a general lack of personal paaranoia would
make me a lousy cypher clerk.  It is Indeed.CRYPTONOMICON.  >-Bryce
<

10) From: Mandy Willison
<Snip>
Is this the Big Swakonski  living with Simpson?
bean'wild! madly roasting to tide me over the pond to HK

11) From: Gareth Conway
<Snip>
Well I have to comment here.
1. Just because someone here has aquired Cuban coffee doesnt mean they are
in the U.S. at the time. Or roasted and drank it in the U.S. (Or for that
matter maybe that email was written on a laptop in Mexico and send via cell
phone).
2. I have too have just read the big book CRYTONOMICON.  The best damn book
I have read in YEAAAAARRSSSS !!!
Stephenson is in a league by himself now. A cross between Catch 22 and John
Fowles. MUST reading for all of us who communicate via email.
Gareth Conway
*Airpopper/Alpenrost/Diedrich
*Beginning of second crack, anything from Indonesian stock or Kenya
cultivars.

12) From: sschurman
Indeed, in fact I am a Canadian Citizen.  I bought, roasted, ground, brewed, and
drank it while I was on vacation in British Columbia, Canada.
Now this e-mail should get the government's attention.  "Cuban" in the subject
line and "Columbia" in the body!
Steve Schurman
Whirley-Pop
Rocky
Europiccola, Santos, ChambordReply Separator
Subject:    RE: + Cuban Coffee 
Author: 
Date:       08/02/2000 6:57 PM
Well I have to comment here.
1. Just because someone here has aquired Cuban coffee doesnt mean they are
in the U.S. at the time. Or roasted and drank it in the U.S. (Or for that
matter maybe that email was written on a laptop in Mexico and send via cell
phone).
Gareth Conway
*Airpopper/Alpenrost/Diedrich
*Beginning of second crack, anything from Indonesian stock or Kenya
cultivars.

13) From: Tom & Maria
I couldnt figure out from this thread if people were discussing Cuban
coffee brewing or Cuban coffee?
In terms of coffee grown in Cuba, it just might be the best example of an
aphorism: "just because its banned, doesnt mean its good". I am no cigar
person, but give me a cup of Dominican any day! -Tom
                  "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
           Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                     http://www.sweetmarias.com

14) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
In one of only a few Cuban cookbooks in print in English and
circulated in the U.S., I saw that a classic Cuban coffee is made by
boiling fine grind in a pan for a couple of minutes and then strain
through cotton flannel filter. The book (or possibly another Cuban
cookbook) proceeded to say that because Cuban coffee is similar to
Jamaican coffee, Jamaican coffee is recommended as a substitution.
(Of course the readers outside the US could get the real Cuban
beans...)
Does anyone know how authentic Cuban coffee preparation is like? Is
what I read correct? (modernized or perhaps sophisticated books called
for espresso machine or stove top pot)
I know top quality Cuban coffee is excellent, and the market value is
not too far from JBM or Puerto Rican. However, I see no reason why
they recommend Jamaican coffee for the recipe...
Another thing. The book mentioned that cotton filter is commonly
available at Hispanic stores. Did anyone try to look around for one?
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

15) From: Monty Harris
In Miami the common coffee brand used was a black, red and yellow canned
brand, Cafe Bustelo.  The home preparation method is with a mocha pot.
Cafe Cubano is espresso with a generous dose of sugar.  Here is a URL that
shows the can of coffee, I know it's is even common in the grocery here in
California.http://www.thecoffee.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID7/monty 
<Snip>
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16) From: Andrew Thomas
Ryuji, try this:http://www.ineedcoffee.com/99/08/cubano/Free e-mail!  you
A service of www.WallaWallaGuide.com
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17) From: Timothy A Reed
On Wed, 22 Aug 2001 14:30:05 -0700 (PDT) Andrew Thomas 
writes:
<Snip>
Espresso loaded with sugar?  What's so great about that?  Or do I just
not get it? :)
-Tim
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18) From:
Exactly, I work with a lot of latinos from the Miami area and they all make
cuban coffee just like that.  They have asked me to roast coffee for them
that tastes just like Bustelo, which to their taste is wonderful!
Scott

19) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
From: 
Subject: Re: +Cuban coffee
Date: Wed, 22 Aug 2001 17:34:28 -0500
<Snip>
I think Pilon (medium ground and vacuum packed in alminum lined
package) is also popular among people from Miami. When I tasted it, it
was like light roasted low grade Columbian and Robusta. But did anyone
try to come up with a blend and roast that has similar character but
superior quality? (If they are going to boil it for a couple of
minutes then all the effort will be wasted :-)
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

20) From: John - wandering Texas
Its not as bad as it sounds - I wouldn't make a steady diet of it, but I've
made a brew close to that when I had to work all night. I then worked at
high speed :O)

21) From: Timothy A Reed
On Wed, 22 Aug 2001 18:21:43 -0500 "John  - wandering Texas"
 writes:
<Snip>
I've
<Snip>
at
<Snip>
I'll file it under "to do during finals week" :)
-Tim
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Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
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22) From:

23) From: Mike DeZelar
On Fri, 24 Aug 2001 10:50:41 +0200, Erik Kleijn wrote:
<Snip>
It is?  I though *good* espresso needed no sugar, as its own natural
sweetness was more than sufficient.  That is how I drink it, but then
I've always had my coffee black with no sugar.  There's nothin' like
the sweet taste of a double espresso of Tom's Classic Italian Blend to
start your day!
Now that I've gotten used to freshly roasted quality coffee, though, I
don't know that I could drink restaurant coffee anymore without cream.
In fact, I usually just avoid it altogether!
-- 
Michael DeZelar        Elk River, Minnesota, USA
O-
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24) From: John - wandering Texas
OK - my 2 cents (my own appraisal) worth.   When I first got hooked on
Espresso, it was served with raw sugar and a twist of lemon peel.  I loved
it and figured that was the only way to serve it. Over time I found my way
into a Starbucks here in the states - and got my first plain espresso. I
didn't miss the sugar or lemon twist.  A vast majority of the time I have
straight shots because I prefer them.  But a Macchiato now and then is still
a nice change of pace.  So I guess if you're Italian or Italian trained,
sugar seems natural - and if you're Starbucks trained it seems odd.
John - enjoying my first Kona Cona - and heaven can't be much better.

25) From: Michael Scott
On 8/22/01 5:48 PM, "Timothy A Reed"  wrote:
<Snip>
The method for a "Cubano" which our son obtained during a stint as a
barista/roaster (admittedly Minneapolis may not be the best source for
things Cuban...)
Layer the dose in the portafilter -- coffee/sugar/coffee. Pull shot
normally.
mds
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26) From: Jeffrey A. Bertoia
 
John
Congratulations on the Kona Cona...
I took some Italian clients to a local restaurant for dinner one time
when they were visiting that previously served a fair espresso.  In the
meantime they had changed chefs and what they served us was a poorly
made lungo with a lemon peel on the side.
My client looked amused and asked the purpose of the lemon peel.
Neither the waitress or I could explain.  So in the next couple days
I did a little research and the following is the email that I sent him.
 >Mr Rostagno
 >The last time that I took you to dinner in the states, we were
 >served espresso with a lemon peel and neither myself or the
 >waitress could answer.
 >From the Illy web page:
 >Should an espresso be served with a lemon peel?
 >Lemon oils contain terpenes, substances which decrease the sensitivity
 >of our bitter taste buds. So, if the coffee is very bitter due to the
 >poor quality or to the overroasting, you can buffer the bitterness
 >with a lemon peel. However, an even better solution is to use high
 >quality perfectly roasted coffee.
 >Unfortunately many believe that an espresso is simply a dark, roasted
 >coffee; the darker the coffee is roasted, the more "espresso" it
 >becomes. Instead...
 >Espresso is a coffee preparation technique using water under high
 >hydraulic pressure (9 atm) and a temperature below boiling (92-94 C).
 >The above-mentioned misunderstanding explains why consumers add large
 >quantities of milk. Adding the milk buffers the bitterness, thus
 >making it palatable.
 >So I guess the answer is:  To disguise bad coffee!
The next time that Dominic Rostagno came to town I had him over to
my house for an American Barbecue and served some descent espresso
without a lemon peel!
ciao
jeff
John - wandering Texas wrote:
<Snip>
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27) From: John - wandering Texas
Jeff,
	Thanks for the input.  As I look back on it, I think that the folks in
Italy were used to us UA's (Ugly Americans) recoiling from the taste of real
coffee - considering that most of us were living on Army coffee - and just
added the lemon as a matter of course for UA's.  And the sad thing is that I
loved it that way and just assumed that it was the "real" way to serve it.
Grazie
John - turning a little more Hawaiian with every sip :O)

28) From: Mike Surdyk
Hi guys --  I think you're all looking at this thread from the wrong
perspective.
The members of any economy tend to use most whatever is most accessible; the
poorer the economy the more this is true. Even when an economy gains some
affluence its members tend to keep their favorite tastes and flavors.
There's an awful lot of sugar cane in Cuba. Street vendors throughout the
Latin and Caribbean cultures are known to mash/squeeze raw cane to produce a
beverage that they sell. Cuban Coffee is not highly sweetened coffee but
rather a simple syrup flavored with a strong coffee extract. The dominant
taste is certainly the sweetness. More often than not in Cuban Neighborhoods
in Miami you cannot get an unsweetened shot, cortadito (sort of a machiato),
or café con leche. If you try you get a beverage that is less sweet than
normal but still far sweeter than I prefer in an espresso or cappa.
It is also not a hot beverage - it is served warmer than room temperature
but then everything in the tropics is warmer than room temperature.
During the three years that I lived in Miami. I got used to Café Cubano but
I never got to like it.
Mike Surdyk
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

29) From: Jack Berry
Any one have information on the availability of Cuban coffees? I know it's
available in Canada but wonder if there is a way to get it here.
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30) From: John Abbott
David,  Here's another version - more like what we get in Mexicohttp://icuban.com/3guys/cuban_coffee.html   

31) From: Lowe, David
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
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32) From: Joseph A. Feliciani
Hi all,
Anybody catch "The Chris Isaak Show" the other night? Gloria Estefan arrives
to perform with him, but gets him hooked on Cuban coffee, so she can steal
his drummer. Very funny.http://www.sho.com/site/chris/episodes.doGo to the show titled "A Little Help From My Friends" at the bottom of the
page and click "Intervention" to see a clip of him eating coffee beans and
they show his machine.
Joe
RK Drum #9, Solis Maestro Plus, *$ Proteo Barista

33) From: Les
I am going to have a vac pot of  Cuban Coffee here in a few minutes. 
My inlaws went to Costa Rica and brought me back some coffee from Cuba
as a present.  Go figure!  It was vac sealed and pre-ground.  It had a
very nice smell to it as I opened the bag.  Not homeroast, but worth
the experience I suppose.  Anyone out there able to get greens from
Cuba?  Maybe through Canada, not the USA!
Les

34) From: Greg Scace
I was able to get some several years ago when I was in Canada.  It made 
good espresso. Too bad idiotic policies keep us from being able to buy it 
easily.
-Greg
At 10:35 AM 12/27/2004 -0800, you wrote:
<Snip>

35) From: Les
Well, it tasted like swill!  I think the coffee could have been good
if it hadn't been pre-roasted and pre-ground.  I have been again
reminded why we homeroast!!
Les
On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 14:41:39 -0500, Greg Scace  wrote:
<Snip>

36) From: Michael Bamber
Hi, I'm interested in finding out 1.) The availability of Cuban coffee, 
and 2.) more importantly, the standard of the beans presently available. 
Any help would be appreciated. I am assuming (being politically ignorant 
of the trade embargo situation with the US - I live in England. ) that 
Cuban products are still 'unwelcome' in the States.

37) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Michael,
     I've been on the lookout for a decent Cuban coffee for several  
years now.  I've had no luck so far but then again I live in the US.
      jim gundlach
On Aug 15, 2005, at 4:44 AM, Michael Bamber wrote:
<Snip>
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other  
way around."

38) From: Andy Thomas
Michael, There are more non-U.S. particpants at
alt.coffee, to which you may gain access through
Google Groups. Correct, there are few Cuban products
in the U.S. I'd love to try some Cuban coffee, but it
is illegal to bring it in to the country, as I
understand it.
Andy
--- Michael Bamber  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip> ">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip> 
Yahoo! Mail 
Stay connected, organized, and protected. Take the tour: http://tour.mail.yahoo.com/mailtour.html

39) From: Larry English
Here's an interesting article on Cuban coffee:
  http://www.teaandcoffee.net/0901/special.htmLarry
On 8/15/05, Andy Thomas  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

40) From:
I know nothing of the political ramifications, but you can find Cuba 
Turquino available if you enter a Google search for Cuban green coffee.
Remembering the street smells of cities like Bangkok, Manila, Saigon and 
Taegu, I thought they might have been doing more than the Asian classic, 
tea. 
Don't laugh- South Koreans love coffee but because of the latitude it's not=
 
grown there. The chains like *$ etc, cost like Honolulu. Coffee in a Korean=
 
Cafe can be "tear up the mortgage" expensive!
Vietnamese were the second-largest international coffee exporter, behind 
Brazil a couple of years ago! It sounded better than Robusta, so I got 5 
pounds from the highlands on a Google search. 
I played around with roasts and grinds. One real tantalizing combo 
materialized when I roasted 30g of beans quickly to the very first snap of=
 
2nd @4:25 then quenched them on a just- out- of- the- freezer cookie sheet.=
 
Wait for What? The aroma put me in a street scene in Bangkok! No waiting, n=
o 
thinking- I just threw them in my brand-new SMP and "pulled the lever." 
Three coffee cherries- Ka-Ching! 
I threw the "Drip grind" (looked more like a good espresso grind) into the=
 
12 cup press pot and filled it with water at a full boil (=204 degrees F =
in 
Denver town and environs) for 90 seconds.
I liked the "body" fines in the first cup I decanted lots more than the 
rest, which I filtered through my Bunn basket.
There is probably good reason our gracious hosts don't promote these 
coffees- like erratic cupping or availability- but I sure had a tantalizing=
 
experience. Probably mostly mental... Leave it alone, Ray!
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
 On 8/15/05, Andy Thomas  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the 
Wichita WurliTzer

41) From: Gary Bennett
Michael,
I'm in Australia and am part of a green bean buying co-op. We got a
bag of Cuba Tourquino Lavado last year. Nice bean. Heaps of crema in
each shot. A good 'middle' bean in an espresso blend, but fine as a
single-origin and also in a plunger.
I can't comment on the standard of the 2005 crop, but the bean we got
last year (presumably 2004 crop) was well regarded by many who bought
into the bag. It was in limited supply last year, and I recall reading
that the bad weather experienced earlier this year was expected to
have a significant impact on the current crop.
Regards, Gary
On 8/15/05, Michael Bamber  wrote:
<Snip>

42) From: Niklas Saers
Hi guys,
I just came home from a trip to Cuba, and while the food there was  
generally bad, the coffee was actually quite good (better than what I  
generally get served). While in Trinidad I visited a coffee farm, but  
they were out of green beans so they couldn't sell me any, but they  
had a tiny sample that I took home, just enough to roast for one cup.  
I'm drinking it right now, and it's actually VERY tasty (I'm happy I  
was lucky on this one roast/grind/brew, after all I only had beans for  
this one cup). But on the SM list of coffee I found no cuban coffee.  
What's Cuba's coffee reputation, and where do I get more? :-)
Cheers
     Nik
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43) From: Lynne
hi nik -
the u.s. has a ban on cuban importations - and, just a friendly reminder
that it violates list rules to discuss competitors [and rightly so...]
totally off topic - how did you enjoy you visit there? i'd love to go,
someday...i LOVE cuban music, art - and the story of their people. well,
basically, i'm interested in different cultures, so cuba would be one of the
many places i'd like to visit... but, for noe, i will travel by means of the
internt.
lynne
On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 8:27 AM, Niklas Saers  wrote:
<Snip>
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44) From: Vicki Smith
We can get Cuban greens here in Canada, but it is as illegal for 
Canadians to *gift* it to our neighbours down south as it would be for 
Tom to import it from Cuba.
You'll just have to go North (and bring your roaster).
vicki
Lynne wrote:
<Snip>
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45) From: sci
Years ago, I drank a couple of #s of Cuban out of London, but I didn't roast
it. It was great coffee. I've also had Dom. Rep. and lots of Puerto Rican.
PR Yauco rivals JBM, IMO. My experience with pure JBM is that it is
overrated, by about $12#All of these islands r. When I hear somebody boast
that JBM is the "best coffee" in the world, I try not to show my amusement.
But if it floats his boat,  it doesn't matter. Anyway, I wish we could get
more Caribbean coffees (except, er, Cuban). I have no Caribbeans in my
otherwise well diversified stash, a real gap. I guess Tom just rarely finds
any decent lots. :-(
I've never even seen green Cubans, but I'd suspect that they look a lot like
green Yaucos.
Ivan
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Date: Sun, 18 May 2008 14:27:08 +0200
From: Niklas Saers 
Subject: [Homeroast] Cuban coffee
To: homeroast
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset-ASCII; format=flowed; delsp=yes
Hi guys,
I just came home from a trip to Cuba, and while the food there was
generally bad, the coffee was actually quite good (better than what I
generally get served). While in Trinidad I visited a coffee farm, but
they were out of green beans so they couldn't sell me any, but they
had a tiny sample that I took home, just enough to roast for one cup.
I'm drinking it right now, and it's actually VERY tasty (I'm happy I
was lucky on this one roast/grind/brew, after all I only had beans for
this one cup). But on the SM list of coffee I found no cuban coffee.
What's Cuba's coffee reputation, and where do I get more? :-)
Cheers
    Nik
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46) From: Niklas Saers
Hi,
<Snip>
Ah, I live in Denmark so I didn't think about that when I wrote the  
mail, and I didn't mean to ask about competitors, just about getting  
the beans. ;-)
<Snip>
We came for the music, and boy do they have good music. :-) We took  
lots of dance lessons (I met my girlfriend at salsa three years ago,  
so while in Cuba I just had to propose :-) ), met lots of wonderful  
people (and, btw, they treat Americans just as nice as other  
tourists), had some really horrible food (they haven't had spices for  
50 years so it seems they've forgotten how to cook. They have, to come  
vaguely back to topic again, done wonders with their coffee :-) The  
worst coffee I had was like a cup from a really good fully-automatic  
office-machine, while the best cup was a stop short of my favourite  
barrista's) and really nice fruit. :-) The art is great, and we went  
to the ballet which was really good. It was actually quite funny to  
see, since they brought their children as well. A 1 year old child  
wanted to be with his dad, so his mother went down to where he was  
sitting, the conductor put the music and dancers on pause, the child  
was passed from hand to hand until he reached his dad, and then the  
music and dance continued. I've never seen anything like it, and I  
study classical music. ;-)
Cheers
	Nik
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47) From: Sandy Andina
My husband's former medical partner (now retired) went back to Havana  
last year to visit the family cemetery plots--he moved his mom to  
Miami Beach long ago.  (He's a Cuban-born Sephardi; a relative rarity  
as most Jews from Cuba are Ashkenazi). He is also unusual in that he  
originally left because he thought Fidel Castro (a college classmate)  
had sold out the revolution and was no better in that regard than  
Batista.  He felt he stood a better chance as a campus revolutionary  
in the US, never dreaming that some day he'd become a successful  
cardiologist.
Anyway, he reports that "everything in Cuba now is sh*t."  Buildings,  
roads and cards are in disrepair, only tourists can afford the decent  
hotels and restaurants, people are walking around in clothes in  
desperate need of mending, the food is blah, but only the coffee is  
good.  He didn't mention the art or music, but showed us photos of  
his old haunts---the buildings look like the sets of Miami Vice, but  
after the show was canceled and nobody was touching them up.  A lot  
of 1960's "Space Age" architecture gone to seed.
On May 22, 2008, at 1:36 AM, Niklas Saers wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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48) From: raymanowen
" I've never even seen green Cubans..."
Me neither- thought they were Martians.
On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 10:00 PM, sci  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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49) From:
Although most American travel to Cuba is forbidden, US visitors to Mexico are frequently offered cheap trips to Cuba paid for in Mexican pesos.  Seems the Cubans welcome all who take this route and are careful not to put evidence of this sinful behavior in the Americans' passports.   I vaguely recall hearing in Mexico (over Negra Modelo, etc., which in my experience are better than Mexican restaurant coffee except at the very high end) from veterans of such trips that their experiences had been positive.  Not having become an SM coffee freak as of that time, I didn't ask about their coffee experiences.
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50) From: Vicki Smith
That would be quite an effort just to get some coffee, for sure! About
five years ago, before I became a Canadian citizen, my husband's
family got a great deal on a group travel thing to Cuba. My SIL said
there was a way to get me in. My feeling was that as a US citizen, I
didn't want to travel anywhere that there was not a US consular
presence.
I could go now legally, but I guess I am just not a cabana at the
beach type gal.
vicki (writing from the wilds of the University of Saskatchewan}
On 5/22/08, johnmhowison  wrote:
<Snip>
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51) From: Tom Ulmer
If you didn't renounce your U.S. citizenship your travel would still be
illegal.
A Negro Modelo at the brewery near Saltillo or a café con leché on the =
Playa
Ancón should be experienced. I'm not of a mind that either should have to=
 be
licensed.  =

52) From: Seth Grandeau
It's going to be interesting to see what happens once Fidel passes.  I'll be
curious to see how the presidential candidates covet the Cuban population in
Florida...
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53) From: Sandy Andina
Don't hold your breath. Even Obama is talking about "cautiously  
proceeding" to discuss the *possibility* of *eventually* normalizing  
trade with Cuba--though he is for allowing US citizens to visit family  
members still over there.  Nobody wants to tick off the passionately  
anti-Castro Cuban-immigrant (and descendants thereof) community in S.  
FL.   They by and large want an exemption for family travel, but are  
dead set against ending the trade embargo--unless Communism dies the  
same natural death there that it did in Eastern Europe.  So you'll  
just have to settle for Honduran and Nicaraguan cigars for the  
foreseeable future.
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On May 23, 2008, at 9:04 AM, Seth Grandeau wrote:
<Snip>
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54) From: Kris Bhatti
Does anyone have a favorite method for preparing Cuban coffee?  I've volunteered to provide the coffee after dinner on Wednesday and we're having Cuban food.  My brief internet research shows several different methods and it appears that there isn't one standard unique method.  I am planning to use a moka pot, but beyond that I'm open to suggestions.  I'd rather choose from suggestions from this group than a random Google search!
Kris Bhatti
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55) From: Mike Koenig
Kris,
<Snip>
amount of sugar in it.  You need to pull the shots directly onto the
sugar to get that amount to dissolve.
You can also add little bit of steamed milk (which I've usually seen
steamed past the point we normally use for cappuccino, nearly to
scalding) for a "cortadito", similar to a cortado in Spain.
There are some that say cuban coffee is made using a sock, but I'm
pretty sure that's a technique from puerto rico.
--mike
On Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 10:16 PM, Kris Bhatti  wrote:
<Snip>
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56) From: Benjamin VerHage
My sister made it for me once at her coffee shop. Instead of sugar, she put=
 honey in the portafilter layered with the ground coffee. I'm not a big fan=
 of sweet coffee, but it was kinda good.
Ben
From: Mike Koenig 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 7:07:03 AM
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Cuban coffee
Kris,
<Snip>
amount of sugar in it.  You need to pull the shots directly onto the
sugar to get that amount to dissolve.
You can also add little bit of steamed milk (which I've usually seen
steamed past the point we normally use for cappuccino, nearly to
scalding) for a "cortadito", similar to a cortado in Spain.
There are some that say cuban coffee is made using a sock, but I'm
pretty sure that's a technique from puerto rico.
--mike
On Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 10:16 PM, Kris Bhatti  wrote:
<Snip>
lunteered to provide the coffee after dinner on Wednesday and we're having =
Cuban food.  My brief internet research shows several different methods a=
nd it appears that there isn't one standard unique method.  I am planning=
 to use a moka pot, but beyond that I'm open to suggestions.  I'd rather =
choose from suggestions from this group than a random Google search!
<Snip>
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Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee=.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
      =
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57) From: David Rossell
I've had it at a couple of Cuban restaurants.  One just does steamed milk, no
sweetener.  The other uses sweetened, condensed milk.  Very creamy,  but way
too sweet for my taste.
David
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58) From: Doug Hoople
Hi All,
It's been a little tough for the past month, settling in here in New
Zealand.. New Zealand's great, but all my coffee gear was packed into a
container that's working its way past Dubai at the moment, and I've been
brewing pre-ground supermarket coffee in a press.
That's a far cry from the California nirvana of roasting my own Sweet
Maria's beans, grinding them in a high-quality grinder and brewing in a
vacuum pot, all according to carefullly developed procedures.
It's not as bad as it might be. The general run of supermarket coffee in NZ
is better than in the US. But it's been a challenge.
As you'd expect, I've been trying to draw a bead on the roasters, 1) to
improve the quality of the pre-ground coffee until my grinder arrives, and
2) to start the conversation, as Tom recommended, with the roasters about
sourcing green beans from them.
A couple of days ago, I stumbled upon what is, by far, the best commercial
roaster in the country, Havana Coffee Works, in Wellington. They roast with
care, and you can taste the origin in their beans. Almost all the others,
following the long-mistaken guideline that says "espresso means dark roast,"
roast their coffees way too dark. Not only that, but it's
all-espresso-all-the-time in NZ, so that makes for a double whammy for a
filter aficionado like me who hasn't crossed over to the dark side yet. .
At any rate, back to Havana Coffee Works. There's a Cuba-themed riff running
through downtown Wellington, based on the fact that the bohemian district is
centered around Cuba Street. No political affinities, just simple word
association in a country that has no particular opinion of Cuba one way or
another, but the shops have names like Fidel, Floriditas, and Havana.
The Havana Coffee works does actually have a real tie-in to Cuba, though.
Because of their word-association name, it was somehow expected that they'd
be purveyors of Cuban coffee, and, after 20 years, that's their best-seller.
They've got coffees, good coffees, well-roasted from all over the world, but
their Cuban coffee is their best-seller. What's in a name? In this case, a
lot.
So I had my first-ever cup of Cuban coffee yesterday, and I have to say it
was a really nice cup of coffee. Roasted to FC, very balanced, medium body,
smooth, easy flavors like you'd expect from a Jamaican Blue Mountain (no
surprise, given the proximity) or a good Kona. I don't think I'd ever adopt
it for the house coffee, but if I were stuck on a desert island and that's
all I could get, I certainly wouldn't be heartbroken.
As I'm writing this, I'm assuming that Cuban coffee is banned in the US,
just like Cuban cigars, but I don't know that for a fact. I can't recall
ever seeing it featured as an origin on sale anywhere, and I can't recall
seeing it at SM, which is the one place where I'd expect to see it if it was
available anywhere.
I'd be very surprised if Tom hasn't had some in all of his travel, but I
can't recall him writing about it.
Nice coffee, though. Aren't they ending the embargo soon?
Doug
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59) From: Derek Bradford
I don't have much to add on the Cuban coffee front (I've lived there, drank
lots, most of it was bad, but no worse than here, save for the chicory
filler), but I do know that NZ has at least one coffee roastermat, and
probably more than that.  They're like laundromats, only with banks of some
sort of coffee roaster.  You go in, choose your greens, roast them and take
them home.  Might be worth it to track one of these down while you're
waiting.
--Derek
On Tue, Dec 8, 2009 at 7:05 PM, Doug Hoople  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Every path but your own is the path of fate.  --Thoreau
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60) From: Doug Hoople
Thanks for the tip, Derek!
I had no idea such a thing existed anywhere. You'd have to hope that the
greens were high quality and not just novelty dross.
Definitely worth a look, though! I'll post back if I find anything.
Doug
On Tue, Dec 8, 2009 at 3:22 PM, Derek Bradford wrote:
<Snip>
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61) From: Yakster
Doug,
Check out this site for NZ Coffee:http://www.coffeefestival.co.nz/-Chris
On Tue, Dec 8, 2009 at 3:26 PM, Doug Hoople  wrote:
<Snip>
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62) From: Edward Bourgeois
A "roastermat"? what a great thing! Hope they allow BYOB(beans that is).
On Tue, Dec 8, 2009 at 6:22 PM, Derek Bradford  wr=
ote:
<Snip>
nk
<Snip>
some
<Snip>
take
<Snip>
 NZ
<Snip>
nd
<Snip>
al
<Snip>
ith
<Snip>
or
<Snip>
y'd
<Snip>
 a
<Snip>
it
<Snip>
dy,
<Snip>
opt
<Snip>
's
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
ee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
-- =
Ed Bourgeois aka farmroast
Amherst MA.http://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/Homeroast mailing list
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63) From: Doug Hoople
No luck on finding the roastermat. Can't think of what to search for.
I'll ask around at the cafes.
Doug
On Tue, Dec 8, 2009 at 5:31 PM, Edward Bourgeois wrote:
<Snip>
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64) From: Derek Bradford
The people I know who saw them don't remember what they were called either.
Who knows; maybe there is only one.
On Wed, Dec 9, 2009 at 5:12 PM, Doug Hoople  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Every path but your own is the path of fate.  --Thoreau
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65) From: Yakster
I did a quick web search yesterday because it sounded like such a great
idea, but I didn't find anything (except that site showing the NZ Coffee
Awards for local NZ roasters that I sent to the list).
It sounds like a fascinating business plan, tempting, but something Tom
would be able to pull off much easier then say, I would.  There were a
number of places in Silicon Valley that let you come in and brew beer on
their equipment and would even bottle and label it for you.  A friend brewed
a batch once that they dumped on him because they said it got contaminated.
A place that walked you through roasting coffee would be much easier because
you could leave with finished product in about an hour.
Seems like some sort of arrangement could be made if you got to know the
smaller coffee houses that roast coffee, but it would be great to see places
that would let you come in and roast your own profile with their beans or
maybe your own greens.
Let us know what you find.
-Chris
On Wed, Dec 9, 2009 at 1:12 PM, Doug Hoople  wrote:
<Snip>
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