HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Moka Pots (104 msgs / 2028 lines)
1) From: Scott Jensen
I think the closest brew I've tried to a Cafe Crema is my Hario vac pot
brewer.  Strong, smooth and sweet but unfortunately not made for travel.  I
guess one could get one of those stainless steel briefcases with the foam
inside and have a traveling Hario Kit!  I'd certainly have fun explaining my
passion for great coffee to the airport security folks.
While in Italy we picked up a Moka Pot and a little ceramic hot plate just a
little bigger than the moka pot.  It was a neat combination, we used it
during most of our trip, for those mornings when we needed a eye opener.
Of course it was 220v, so not much use here.  That little hot plate was an
inferno of heat- defiantly not something Baratza would ever carry! :)
Scott
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: steven willis
I use a Moka pot and a small lab hot plate as my road
coffee rig, with the little Zass hand grinder.  I like
it a lot, and sometimes use it at home, particularly
if I want an after-dinner cup of decaf that's a bit
bigger than an espresso.  Generally, I prefer
espresso, but prefer the Moka pot to French Press. 
Haven't tried a vacuum brewer yet.
I also like the Moka pot for iced coffee.  For that I
prefer Harar or Moka Kadir, sometimes Kenya Kora
peaberry.  It's best if I brew it, then put it in a
jar and chill it overnight.  It's okay to brew it and
just pour it over ice if I'm in a hurry, but it waters
it down too much for my taste.
Also, Tom warns about using the handle for screwing it
together and apart, but my experience is that the
handle comes loose even when care is taken.  No screw
on it, so I'm thinking I'll have to glue it on with
something.  Epoxy?  I'm hesitant about any glues I
normally use because of the heat.  Anybody solved that
one?
Steve Willis

3) From: Lesley Albjerg
Try JB Weld
 
Les
steven willis  wrote:
I use a Moka pot and a small lab hot plate as my road
coffee rig, with the little Zass hand grinder. I like
it a lot, and sometimes use it at home, particularly
if I want an after-dinner cup of decaf that's a bit
bigger than an espresso. Generally, I prefer
espresso, but prefer the Moka pot to French Press. 
Haven't tried a vacuum brewer yet.
I also like the Moka pot for iced coffee. For that I
prefer Harar or Moka Kadir, sometimes Kenya Kora
peaberry. It's best if I brew it, then put it in a
jar and chill it overnight. It's okay to brew it and
just pour it over ice if I'm in a hurry, but it waters
it down too much for my taste.
Also, Tom warns about using the handle for screwing it
together and apart, but my experience is that the
handle comes loose even when care is taken. No screw
on it, so I'm thinking I'll have to glue it on with
something. Epoxy? I'm hesitant about any glues I
normally use because of the heat. Anybody solved that
one?
Steve Willis

4) From: Paul Goelz
At 08:48 PM 9/19/2004, you wrote:
<Snip>
Try JB Weld.  I think it is good to something like 400 degrees F and you 
can usually find it in the hardware store.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
paul
pgoelzhttp://www.pgoelz.com

5) From: Vince Petrell
Does anyone have experience with Moka Pots. I am thinking of getting one, a=
nd have looked at the Krups Moca Brew and the Ericka Moka Pot from Sweet Ma=
rias. I mainly use a French Press, but wanted to try something a little dif=
ferent after reading some articles about them.
Any recommendations for purchasing one?
Thanks,
Vince

6) From: Peter Schmidt
Vince,  I have a Krups Moka Brew and really like it.  It's a bit richer than
the press pot.  I press 3X a day, and use the MB only when I need more than
one cup.  I have it dialed in for two mugs or a full pot.  It is a little
finicky about the grind and amount of coffee, but after a few pots it's very
good.  A local outlet has several of the for $80, about $20 less than what I
paid.  The only improvement I would make would be a gold screen filter.
Paper takes too much out!
Peter Schmidt

7) From: Vince Petrell
Peter,
Thanks for the update on the Krups. I think the richer coffee would be some=
thing I would like.
Vince
<Snip>
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<Snip>
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<Snip>
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<Snip>
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<Snip>

8) From: Jean
I have the Krupps Moka Pot.  I like it, but it stands alone, meaning it =
isn't the same as stovetop moka, nor presspot (in fact, I'd say it is =
closer to vacpot).  Like a regular mokapot, it is designed to make a =
full pot.  You can make less, but it won't be as good.  Now that I am =
espresso-less  it is my brewing method of choice =if= =
I will be serving more than just myself.  For single cups, I use my =
small stovetop moka pot, or drip.
 
YMMV,
Jean  :~)

9) From: Nate
Hello all,
I just took some time to google and find out what a moka pot is and I've
realized that this is something that I might like.  It seems like a
relatively inexpensive way to brew espresso (which I just found out liked
after discovering what an Americano was from this--Thanks!!).  So I got to
thinking: "You pay for what you get" and was wondering how close does this
thing come to an espresso from a several thousand dollar machine?  Is it no
where close?  Is it somewhat close?  Is it completely different?
I saw a lot of moka pots on the "On a Budget" thread and that's what got me
thinking about this.
Thanks,
Nate

10) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
its not espresso, it makes black coffee  
From: Nate [mailto:ndunbar] 
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2007 1:48 PM
To: Home Roast List
Subject: +Moka Pots
Hello all, 
I just took some time to google and find out what a moka pot is and I've
realized that this is something that I might like.  It seems like a
relatively inexpensive way to brew espresso (which I just found out liked
after discovering what an Americano was from this--Thanks!!).  So I got to
thinking: "You pay for what you get" and was wondering how close does this
thing come to an espresso from a several thousand dollar machine?  Is it no
where close?  Is it somewhat close?  Is it completely different?  
I saw a lot of moka pots on the "On a Budget" thread and that's what got me
thinking about this.  
Thanks, 
Nate 

11) From: Eddie Dove
Nate,
It is not espresso.  It is a different type of coffee brew though.  It can
be quite rich and "thick" and one could dilute it for and Americanoesque
type of drink.  Give it a try.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/18/07, Nate  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/18/07, Nate  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Lynne Biziewski
I dilute mine for a strong Americano. I love it. Just beware of really cheap
pots that are available - the brand that SM sells is excellent. I have a
couple I got at a local store for practically nothing (one was a gift
certificate/credit, so it was for nothing), but I made sure that they both
were good quality before I purchased them.
Lynne

13) From: Nate
Sounds like it is somewhere between espresso and drip.  I might like that
quite a bit.  Oh man, now I have another thing to keep on my watch list to
keep an eye out for....I'm blaming all of you ;-)
Nate
On 1/18/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Lynne Biziewski
Oh, this is JUST the beginning...
Lynne

15) From: Larry Johnson
Really; you wouldn't believe what these people will convince you that you
can't (or shouldn't) live without....;-D
Larry J (Lilboybrew
On 1/18/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Having a positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it annoys
enough people to make it worth the effort."

16) From: David F Iseminger
I concur I had one for a while it makes strong black coffee but it is not
really espresso.  I also had a steam machine, way back when.  I think
when it comes to home espresso, you do get what you pay for-IMHO

17) From: Myron J
Then you have Bialetti's special Moka Pots, the Brikka and the Mukka. 
Express:
The first is gives you Moka brewed coffee with a smoother taste and a layer 
of "crema"..that is a brew different than moka coffee..but not "real" 
espresso either--There are a slew of Brikka lovers..(I was one until i got a 
Gaggia espresso machine)
The latter "froths" milk while it brews a Moka coffee...
And then there are new brewing methods that yield a powerful brew..
Have you built a new cabinet in your kitchen yet??
Myron Joshua
Kibbutz Kfar Etzion
90912
Israel
+972-(0)2-9935 178

18) From: Lynne Biziewski
Unless you don't actually HAVE to have espresso - and just want to
experience a fine cuppa. Money doesn't always equal a good experience. I
wouldn't be the cook - oops, sorry, off topic - or the stove top coffee
roaster I am if I wasn't dirt poor for all the years my kids were growing
up.
All those Italians who roast (or at least, they used to, years ago) on their
back porches w/homemade equipment, and made their own Moka pot brews - they
must know something!
Lynne

19) From: Lynne Biziewski
Sorry, I was replying to David, but forgot to include the quote:
I think when it comes to home espresso, you do get what you pay for-IMHO
<Snip>
On 1/18/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Eddie Dove
There are two Moka Pots on the Sweet Maria's Sale Page ...http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.sale-items.shtmlEddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/18/07, Nate  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/18/07, Nate  wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Eddie Dove
Actually,
There is a third near the bottom that says "Free", but you have to fix it.
Eddie

22) From: Lynne Biziewski
VERY tempting...

23) From: Brett Mason
Nate,
How close?  Several thousand dollars...
BUT, this is THE method in small shops across Italy, and is worthy of your
time.  Slow heating the pot will elicit a rich, sweet cup worth the
effort...
Cheers,
Brett
On 1/18/07, Nate  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

24) From: Lynne Biziewski
Ah... I'm too slow - it's been sold.
Anyway, I don't need a third!
L.
On 1/18/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Zane Goff
i'm a moka pot user -and while its not
espresso it does make some pretty tasty coffee.
calling it espresso was a marketing ploy 
when they first came out i think.
and apparently they haven't thought of another word for it.
the taste is similar to press or drip,
but more concentrated.  and more flavor imho.
i don't have the money or counterspace for an espresso machine
and the end product is about the same as what low end 'espresso' 
machines put out. there is always a rim of crema in the pot,
so for now thats good enough for me.
but make sure to get a stainless steel one if you buy,
cooking with aluminum is just a bad idea.
its a good choice for being so simple, but nowhere close
to a thousand dollar machine.  
happy brews,
zane
From: Nate [mailto:ndunbar] 
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2007 1:48 PM
To: Home Roast List
Subject: +Moka Pots
Hello all, 
I just took some time to google and find out what a moka pot is and 
I've
realized that this is something that I might like.  It seems like a
relatively inexpensive way to brew espresso (which I just found out 
liked
after discovering what an Americano was from this--Thanks!!).  So I got 
to
thinking: "You pay for what you get" and was wondering how close does 
this
thing come to an espresso from a several thousand dollar machine?  Is 
it no
where close?  Is it somewhat close?  Is it completely different?  
I saw a lot of moka pots on the "On a Budget" thread and that's what 
got me
thinking about this.  
Thanks, 
Nate 
---------------------------------
TV dinner still cooling?
Check out "Tonight's Picks" on Yahoo! TV.

26) From: Ronnie Kramer
I'm planning on getting one myself.  I heard, I think on sweet maria's web site, that it makes something between expresso and turkish.
Nate  wrote:  Sounds like it is somewhere between espresso and drip.  I might like that quite a bit.  Oh man, now I have another thing to keep on my watch list to keep an eye out for....I'm blaming all of you ;-) 
Nate
  On 1/18/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:  Nate,
It is not espresso.  It is a different type of coffee brew though.  It can be quite rich and "thick" and one could dilute it for and Americanoesque type of drink.  Give it a try.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/  
  On 1/18/07, Nate < ndunbar> wrote:  Hello all, 
I just took some time to google and find out what a moka pot is and I've realized that this is something that I might like.  It seems like a relatively inexpensive way to brew espresso (which I just found out liked after discovering what an Americano was from this--Thanks!!).  So I got to thinking: "You pay for what you get" and was wondering how close does this thing come to an espresso from a several thousand dollar machine?  Is it no where close?  Is it somewhat close?  Is it completely different?  
I saw a lot of moka pots on the "On a Budget" thread and that's what got me thinking about this.  
Thanks, 
Nate 
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

27) From: Vicki Smith
When I lived in Italy as a student, the family I stayed with introduced 
me to moka pots. Mrs Galli told me to never, ever close the lid on the 
moka pot as it was brewing. She said it was only on there to aid with 
pouring. So mebbe that free pot is a real steal ;).
vicki
Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>

28) From: miKe mcKoffee
By modern definitions moka pots do not make espresso. However, espresso
originally was brewed under steam pressure not current methods with much
higher pressures around 9bar. So suppose moka pots technically could be
considered to make "old style" espresso versus "modern" espresso.
Interesting article on the history of Italian Coffee and England.http://www.cappuccinoconquests.org.uk/The lecture is found by clicking on the pdf link "Inaugural Lecture" down
the page or directly:http://www.cappuccinoconquests.org.uk/uhinfo/library/q14260_3.pdfKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Zane Goff
	Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2007 11:52 AM
	
	i'm a moka pot user -and while its not
	espresso it does make some pretty tasty coffee.
	calling it espresso was a marketing ploy 
	when they first came out i think.
	and apparently they haven't thought of another word for it.
	the taste is similar to press or drip,
	but more concentrated.  and more flavor imho.
	i don't have the money or counterspace for an espresso machine
	and the end product is about the same as what low end 'espresso' 
	machines put out. there is always a rim of crema in the pot,
	so for now thats good enough for me.
	but make sure to get a stainless steel one if you buy,
	cooking with aluminum is just a bad idea.
	its a good choice for being so simple, but nowhere close
	to a thousand dollar machine.  
	
	happy brews,
	
	zane

29) From: Angelo
Not only Italians. Most of the Spanish-speaking folks I know from the 
Caribbean use the Moka pot, or a sock...
Angelo
<Snip>

30) From: Brian Kamnetz
You know, come to think of it, I NEVER close the lid during brewing - and I
pour all the coffee out right away. And then the lid gets in the way when
I'm cleaning up the moka pot....
Brian
On 1/18/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>

31) From: Brett Mason
Starbucks uses old used socks...
On 1/18/07, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

32) From: Laura Micucci
STOP!  You're killing me.  I just ordered the 4 tasse...and of course a
sample pack...seemed such a waste to have the UPS guy come all the way here
without coffee.
Thanks for the heads up!  (hopefully they still have it)
On 1/18/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Laura Micucci
www.freshroastedforyou.com

33) From: Brian Kamnetz
It took me a while to get it figured out, but I finally did, thanks to a lot
of suggestions from list members, and it was worth it. I am in the camp that
grinds quite finely, and once the coffee begins to seep through I turn the
heat down very low, or pick it up off the burner, so that it takes about 5
mins for my little 4-tasse to finish brewing. I also try to stop the brewing
before the steam "blasts" through.
Brian
On 1/18/07, Laura Micucci  wrote:
<Snip>

34) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Brian, excellent description of how to brew with a Moka pot without it
burning the coffee and being bitter. 
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brian Kamnetz
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2007 6:34 PM
It took me a while to get it figured out, but I finally did, thanks to a lot
of suggestions from list members, and it was worth it. I am in the camp that
grinds quite finely, and once the coffee begins to seep through I turn the
heat down very low, or pick it up off the burner, so that it takes about 5
mins for my little 4-tasse to finish brewing. I also try to stop the brewing
before the steam "blasts" through. 
Brian

35) From: Les
Moka Pot will be put in action tomorrow!  It is getting lonely.
Les
On 1/18/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>

36) From: jim gundlach
There have been several give and take and give again's on the issue  
of Moka pots.  My major problem with them is that they are steam  
pressure driven and I find that really scorches the coffee.  My most  
successful Moka coffee was in Durango, Colorado at an elevation of  
about 6,500 feet.  It is not espresso.
     Pecan Jim
On Jan 18, 2007, at 12:48 PM, Nate wrote:
<Snip>

37) From: Blake R.
Is that the way a vac pot is as well?  I think the moka pot forces water 
through at the optimal temp like a vac pot.  Water is forced up the tube and 
into the grounds not steam?

38) From: Justin Schwarz
Moka have the added benefit of being pretty forgiving of grind too.   
A consistent grind will benefit any brew method but I used mine with  
a whirly chopper for quite a while with very good results.
-Justin

39) From: Larry Johnson
I tried it your way this morning. Best cup I've ever made with this pot
(Brazil Cerrado, C roast).  Thanks for the tip.
Larry J (Lilboybrew)
On 1/18/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Having a positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it annoys
enough people to make it worth the effort."

40) From: Brian Kamnetz
Glad to hear that it worked for you, Larry. Again, "my" way, including the
very slow brewing, is really owed to helpful tips I received on this list.
Thanks again to all who patiently answered my long series of questions!
Brian
On 1/19/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

41) From: John David Huddle
Both my Moka pots are electric- Bialetti (6 tasse, and 2 tasse).
The little one works on 110 or 220 volts.   When I toured China a couple of 
years ago (chaperone for the Columbus Symphony Youth Orchestra) I took this 
one, a Zass Turkish grinder, and vac-packed home roast packets.
I usually pull the plug when the brew has about half filled the upper 
chamber.
For me, filling the basket about 2/3 full of ground beans give me the best 
brew.
Dave
Get in the mood for Valentine's Day. View photos, recipes and more on your 
Live.com page. http://www.live.com/?addTemplate=ValentinesDay&ocid01MSN30A0701

42) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 1/19/07, John David Huddle  wrote:
<Snip>
It's interesting to hear that partially filling the basket works well for
you. I was under the impression that it was best to fill the basket
completely up.
Brian

43) From: Nate
Wow...thanks for all of the input, everyone.  I'm definitely going to be on
the look out for a newer moka pot.  It sounds like it can make a splendid
cup with a little bit of know-how....
Nate
On 1/19/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>

44) From: Brian Kamnetz
Nate,
Coffee from a moka pot is definitely different from other extraction
methods. I like every change as it cools, and think I actually like it best
at room temperature. Some beans lend themselves to the moka pot better than
others do. Personally, I LOVE yellow bourbon in the moka pot. On the other
hand, I think I prefer Harar Green Stripe (I think that's what I have
roasted now) brewed a bit stronger than others in the press pot.
Brian
On 1/19/07, Nate  wrote:
<Snip>

45) From: Blake R.
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I tried it this morning to and it was the best brew I have gotten from =
the Moka pot.  Great tip.
Thanks ... Blake

46) From: Les
I had a wonderful Moka Pot of Guat. Aqua Tibia this morning.  I ground the
coffee with my "new" Zass.  I hadn't really brewed a grind with it yet.
What an amazing hand grinder they make.  So just for fun, I brewed in the
Krups Moka Brew and the Technivorm too.  I didn't want to go into caffeine
overload, or I would have fired up the Cremina too.  All three were great
cups of coffee and all three were different.  The Technivorm brought out
the gentle nuances of the coffee more than the other two brew methods.  The
KMB gave some of the nuances, but had the boldness of the Moka Pot.  The
Moka Pot was a nice rich smooth cup of coffee.  I would have to rate it
close to the Americano that I had yesterday of the same bean.  However, the
rich liquid velvet of the double shot espresso was no where in sight with
the Moka Pot.
Les
On 1/19/07, Blake R.  wrote:
<Snip>

47) From: Ronnie Kramer
Where did you find a new Zass?
Les  wrote:    I had a wonderful Moka Pot of Guat. Aqua Tibia this morning.  I ground the coffee with my "new" Zass.  I hadn't really brewed a grind with it yet.  What an amazing hand grinder they make.  So just for fun, I brewed in the Krups Moka Brew and the Technivorm too.  I didn't want to go into caffeine overload, or I would have fired up the Cremina too.  All three were great cups of coffee and all three were different.  The Technivorm brought out the gentle nuances of the coffee more than the other two brew methods.  The KMB gave some of the nuances, but had the boldness of the Moka Pot.  The Moka Pot was a nice rich smooth cup of coffee.  I would have to rate it close to the Americano that I had yesterday of the same bean.  However, the rich liquid velvet of the double shot espresso was no where in sight with the Moka Pot. 
   
  Les
  On 1/19/07, Blake R.  wrote:       I tried it this morning to and it was the best brew I have gotten from the Moka pot.  Great tip.
   
  Thanks ... Blake

48) From: Les
In "the Father Land."  I bought two from Germany off of Ebay.  The bummer is
the last one I was watching this week went for well in the $150.00 range.
People are checking them out again.  I was the only bidder on two of them
just after Christmas.  One went to my Daughter and Son-in-Law, and the other
is replacing the one I put in the "Oregon with Love." espresso tradition.
Les
On 1/19/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:
<Snip>

49) From: Angelo
I used to have a web site with two Italian guys demonstrating the 
correct procedure for making espresso in a Moka Pot.. It was 
hilarious! I can't seem to locate it, but the following tutorial 
seems to be derived from that demo but has been Anglicized... pity. 
But, it's still very informative...http://tinyurl.com/yvld2c

50) From: Ronnie Kramer
Thanks Les,  I'll keep my eye on ebay.
Les  wrote:    In "the Father Land."  I bought two from Germany off of Ebay.  The bummer is the last one I was watching this week went for well in the $150.00 range.  People are checking them out again.  I was the only bidder on two of them just after Christmas.  One went to my Daughter and Son-in-Law, and the other is replacing the one I put in the "Oregon with Love." espresso tradition. 
   
  Les 
  On 1/19/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:   Where did you find a new Zass?   
Les  wrote:     I had a wonderful Moka Pot of Guat. Aqua Tibia this morning.  I ground the coffee with my "new" Zass.  I hadn't really brewed a grind with it yet.  What an amazing hand grinder they make.  So just for fun, I brewed in the Krups Moka Brew and the Technivorm too.  I didn't want to go into caffeine overload, or I would have fired up the Cremina too.  All three were great cups of coffee and all three were different.  The Technivorm brought out the gentle nuances of the coffee more than the other two brew methods.  The KMB gave some of the nuances, but had the boldness of the Moka Pot.  The Moka Pot was a nice rich smooth cup of coffee.  I would have to rate it close to the Americano that I had yesterday of the same bean.  However, the rich liquid velvet of the double shot espresso was no where in sight with the Moka Pot. 
   
  Les
  On 1/19/07, Blake R.  wrote:       I tried it this morning to and it was the best brew I have gotten from the Moka pot.  Great tip.
   
  Thanks ... Blake

51) From: an iconoclast
On 1/19/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
Hmmmm.  One of our cousins, a native Deutschlander, is coming from Germany
to visit Oregon this summer.  When we visited him a year ago June, I almost
bought a Zass for for 69 Euros which is equal to about $90. But, I hadn't
done my research and had been homeroasting for only a couple of months.  I
may just do some window shopping on the internet and see if he might bring a
couple when he comes.
Take care,
Ann
-- 
Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/index.htm

52) From: MichaelB
Ann,
Tell your friend to go to neighborhood thrift stores and look for them.
Perhaps he can pick some up real cheap like people here pick up poppers and
bread machines.
On 1/20/07, an iconoclast  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

53) From: an iconoclast
On 1/20/07, MichaelB  wrote:
<Snip>
Actually, I may request he save his suitcase space for some Krups Moka
Brews.  Mine just died in the middle of a brew cycle this am.  It won't heat
water anymore. The customer service center is closed until Monday and I want
it fixed.  I'm having an anxiety attack about it.
I found some new ones online from a German vendor, but the shipping is more
than the machine. I had 2 spares, but now that just leaves one.  I told my
daughter she needs to get hers out of storage while she's living with me, so
we can put some mileage on her machine rather than use up mine.  I just
don't know what I will do when they are no longer viable. I can use the
Aeropress for one cup,  but that still doesn't give me a whole pot of coffee
at a time.
Bummed,
Ann
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54) From: Michael Dhabolt
Ann,
On 1/20/07, an iconoclast  wrote:
<Snip>
Unless you have 220/240 Volt power wired into your brewing location it might
not be all that good an idea.
Mike (just plain)

55) From: an iconoclast
On 1/20/07, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>
Ann
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56) From: Michael Dhabolt
Ann,
I imagine that you could find converters that work the other direction, a
quick google didn't come up with anything that sounded appropriate for the
wattage.  I'm sure it can be done...may be fairly expensive.
Mike (just plain)

57) From: derbyrm
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
You can step the voltage up with a transformer, but even for such a =
comparatively light load as a sewing machine, the transformer is an =
heavy, awkward, expensive lump of iron.  Better would be to have an =
electrician put in a dryer outlet near your brewing location.  That's a =
standard task and makes the 240 volts you need available.
Roger
derbyrm http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm

58) From: Eddie Dove
For which you should not be over-charged.  Instead of neutral,HOT.  Change
of attachment to a screw, given the wire ... the same probably holds true
for your electric dryer and range; given a different circuit breaker.
Eddie
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<Snip>

59) From: Barry Luterman
For those of you who have Moka Pots. Is there any need to own a Moka Pot if
you have an espresso Machine. I have never tried a Moka Pot but have an
espresso machine I use all the time. If I got a Moka Pot just to try would I
just quickly abandon it for my espresso machine? Does the Moka pot have a
place in my kitchen?
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60) From: mirrera
Well, it's a good backup for when something goes wrong with your espresso machine (I know, I know, it doesn't make espresso).  It's cheap.  It doesn't take up much space.  It produces a different cup than any other brewing method.
Just like with my beans, I like variety in brewing methods.  I have 2 espresso machines, drip, vac pot, press, moka, AeroPress, dirty sock, all of which I use regularly (well, maybe not the sock). 
That being said, I use my espresso machines quite a bit more than the Moka pot, but I don't see any reason not to have one, as I like the rich cup it produces.
I don't see any downside.  So I guess the real question is, why NOT have one?
-AdkMike
 ---------

61) From: Kris McN
Barry,
Apples and oranges.  Do you ever brew with any other methods than espresso
and enjoy it?  If so, a moka pot may have a place in your kitchen.  Moka pot
is my current favorite brew method.  I enjoy espresso, but I don't have all
the equipment.  If I did, I'd still keep my moka pot because they give you
two different cups.  I'd also keep my AP, french press, and KMB (which
method I use depends on the bean, and my mood).  All good, all different.
The moka pot will give you a delicious, strong brew, but not like espresso.
I'd say try it!  Do you have a friend you can borrow from?  It's not that
expensive, and I bet you could sell it, no problem, if you decide it's not
your thing.  Or, someone on this list may be willing to barter.
I'm all for anything that'll lead to more coffee consumption!
Best,
Kris
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62) From: miKe mcKoffee
Just get a nice looking one, indeed make a nice coffee decoration:-) IMO the
ones Tom currently carries while functional are a bit boring decorative
wise. Much nicer looking ones out there.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
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63) From: Mike Koenig
Barry,
My opinion is that if you have an espresso machine (and if I remember
right, you have a good one), you won't use the Moka pot that much.  I
have one that I that at one point I used on a hotplate in my office,
but it sits in my pantry unused most of the time.
My experience is that what you get out of it is somewhere between
espresso and "drip" coffee (for lack of a better term), but not as
good as either one.
Of course if you have the need to collect all things coffee,  then you
simply must have one.
--mike
On Thu, Mar 13, 2008 at 4:11 PM, Barry Luterman  wrote:
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64) From: Barry Luterman
That's exactly it. I have a feeling I will probably not use it much if at
all. Just really want to try it once.However, I never see it brewed, even in
a lousy coffee shop that I wouldn't go into.Does it taste anything like the
coffee pot I used as a young Hippie? I think it was Sicilian. It was copper
color. You poured boiling water in the top. Inserted a filter filled with
Medallia D'oro coffee into the bottom  and then inverted the pot and let the
water seep through the coffee. Pour it into a demi-tasse cup with a twist of
lemon peel. New York former hippies will know what I am talking about. Does
the coffee from the moka pot taste anything like that?
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65) From: Brett Mason
Has a place in my kitchen.  It's different from espresso, closer to
French Press - but you have to go slow, not fast, or you'll burn the
coffee....
Brett
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66) From: Barry Luterman
Which has a place in your kitchen the hippie pot or the Moka pot. I remember
now we used to drink cheap wine and stinky cheese with the hippie pot and
sing protest songs. It's all coming back to me now.
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67) From: Treshell
<Snip>
Taste like what you drink when camping.  Brings back the hiking memories we
in the west have.  Not sure you would use it more then a couple of times.
Once I got my Astra GA espresso machine I haven't been able to bring myself
to even use any of my other coffee tools.  I have Thor Ridgeline with my
Astra GA, Obel-Bregant EB, Tramp travel, Technivorm, Aero, Melitta, F.Press,
and a Moka Pot to choose from and its still the espresso machine:>
Tres
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68) From: Brett Mason
I have the MOKA POT ...
Never did the hippie pot thing, although many of my neighbors and
virtually all of my peers did.  In the 70's I was too caught up in
girls, beer, sailing and body-surfing, and then at college I was
plugging into a Christian group....  Not sure I missed much - made up
for it in beer, etc...  Then I Graduated...
Two weeks after, I got married...  Add 27 years to that, 7 kids,
living all over the world, now roasting coffee - we kept all the good
stuff from the 70's...  but I digress...
You need a mokapot.  Slow brewed rich coffee, coarse ground and sweet.
 Similar to a vacpot, the water temp is way too good in a mokapot to
pass up...  Too fast a heat and you overshoot, burning everything - so
be careful....
Cheers,
Brett
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69) From: Barry Luterman
I think with some of the stuff we smoked a few years passed while I wasn't
paying much attention. If any one has a non-aluminum moka pot they want to
swap contact me off list. I have some neat stuff to swap like a Bodum French
Press thermos, Vietnamese drip 1 cupper Cory rod.
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70) From: Brett Mason
Mine's original aluminum - could it be better than that?
B
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71) From: Seth Grandeau
We have a group at work that meets up in the afternoon for a moka pot
(electric).  It's a nice social atmosphere as we wait for it to finish, then
discuss the resulting cup (lately my homeroast).  I've wowed them with fuity
IMV and rich smoky Aged Sumatra.
That being said, I've had no desire to add one at home, where I alternate
between Capresso drip coffee during the week, vac pop on the weekends, and
the Gaggia espresso maker I'm still learning to use.
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72) From: Sandy Andina
My husband loves his electric one--he has a patient who keeps giving  
him "bricks" of Bustelo or Cafe Regil, and they are tailor-made for  
moka pots.
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73) From: Barry Luterman
Sandy you were the one who spoke about the little copper pots that we
inverted and served with lemon peel. Now I remember. Does what we got out of
those taste like what is obtained from the Moka pot?
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74) From: Sandy Andina
On Mar 13, 2008, at 6:47 PM, Barry Luterman wrote:
<Snip>
Pretty similar, though a little bit thinner in body. The flip-drips  
use gravity to get the water through the grounds, whereas the moka pot  
uses the energy of boiling water (and a little steam) to force it up  
through the grounds, which leads to a bit more extraction and even a  
little transitory crema.
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75) From: Lynne
No way - my mokapot doesn't taste like ANYTHING I had when I used to camp.
The key is to brew very slow. It's a rich, wonderful method - different than
espresso, but more full flavored (IMO) than drip anyday.
I can't get mine to work - otherwise I'd be using it. Think I wore it out..
Lynne
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<Snip>
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76) From: Dave
I have an aluminum moka pot with in red enamel, that I really like.
The red makes a nice accent in the kitchen too. I haven't found any
reason not to like the aluminum.
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77) From: Barry Luterman
Just going along with something Tom wrote on The SM site
Moka Pot stovetop brewers produce a dense concentrated cup that's something
between espresso and Turkish coffee. Coffee is placed into a filter between
the lower chamber (that you fill with water) and the upper chamber that will
contain the finished beverage after brewing. Since the water is forced
through the cake of coffee by pressure, the process bears more resemblance
to espresso extraction that infusion (gravity-based) brewing. It's an edgy
way to make coffee; it always seemed a little dangerous to me! Thankfully,
new Mokapots have pressure relief valves on the lower chamber to prevent
espresso pyrotechnics all over your kitchen! I had a bias against this
method too: I avoided it for years because I could only find aluminum moka
pots. But here we have found all-stainless steel brewers that are very, very
nice. And I found some tricks in the brewing method that improve the cup
quality too. You can find those on our *MokaPot Brewing Tip
Sheet!*
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78) From: Larry Johnson
Ok, I'll chime in. Like a lot of others who have posted to this
thread, I have a real line-up of brewers; 2 Moka pots (Bialetti,
aluminum, 2 sizes), 2 Bodum French presses (different sizes), Yama Vac
pot (8 cup), Krups Moka Brew, AeroPress, Presto Scandinavian dripper,
and several versions of pour-overs (Melitta, SwissGold).
I alternate between them all according to what I feel like having, how
much time I have, what bean I'm brewing, whether I'm at home or
traveling (I only travel w/ the AP). The only ones that don't see a
lot of action are the pour-overs and the Presto. The rest are in
regular rotation.
As to the Moka pot - it has it's own characteristic that I don't get
from any of the others, and sometimes it's what I feel like having. I
don't have an espresso maker, but I think I would keep the Moka pots
even if I did.
On 3/13/08, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>
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79) From: Sandy Andina
I have less of a problem with aluminum in moka pots than I do in  
espresso machine boilers because you can always rinse and thoroughly  
dry a moka pot when you're done with it; thus pitting and corrosion is  
not an issue.
On Mar 13, 2008, at 8:45 PM, Larry Johnson wrote:
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80) From: Dean De Crisce
sometimes I want a sweet espresso shot and sometimes I want a few full cups of coffee (without puling 6 shots)...the moka pot fulfills that. However you can burn the coffee. When done right it is a full flavor, rich, heavily particled cup. Drip-type coffees seem thin and way too clean for me.
I've tried the Aeropress...makes a very similar cup in strength to the moka...but cleaner. 
One problem for me is that the aluminum moka pots season over time...they can add some funky flavors which I don't like. I've tried baking soda to get rid of those flavors...didnt work. A better bet may be a stainless steel one.
I also love and make quite a bit of turkish. I feel like I'm drinking the original cup...the way it was brewed over a thousand years ago. I also find it to be very smooth.
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo.

81) From: sci
Moka pots, aka "Bialetti": I love them, they are marvelous jewels. I have
three sizes. You need to get the right size because they need to make a full
pot to work correctly. It is often called stovetop espresso and it is what
many Italians and Latin Americans drink, usually served 50/50 with hot milk.
The Moka makes very strong coffee, but it isnt espresso. It is stronger than
FP. It is delicious stuff though. They are cheap (my first one cost $6). So
why not try one. My favorite is the two cup, the smallest. I have ten cup
and a six cup. Here's the method I use: fresh cold water, medium fine grind
in the filter cup, fill and level cup and shake it down but don't tamp. Put
on a low to medium heat and wait for the magic. As soon as it spews the last
drops remove from heat and enjoy. If you are just going to use the MP
occasionally, don't bother getting stainless, though they are sweet. Alum is
fine unless you have Aluminophobia like some.
"in hoc signo vences" (he said making the sign of the coffee bean)
Scizen
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82) From: Barry Luterman
OK I am getting convinced and have plenty to barter. Anyone have a stainless
steel they are not using?
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83) From: Jeff
I love coffee brewed in a Moka pot. It's unique with a quality and 
character you can't get any other way. That's not to say it's 'better' 
than any other. It's just one more way to enjoy and experience great 
coffee. It's rich coffee that provides a rich experience.
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84) From: Dave Huddle
When I went to China, I took a Bialetti 2 tasse electric moka brewer
-( it worked on 110 or 220 volts.), a Zass Turkish mill and a bunch of
vac-packed little coffee pouches.  I knew that was the only way I'd be
likely to get a decent cup on the trip.
For my taste, I found that diluting the brew a bit gave me a better cup.
Dave
Westerville, OH
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85) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
Yes I have a nice SS with gold trim moka pot I'm not using. NO you can't
have it! Just go play some more poker and order one with money from your
latest victims! Jeeze, we ain't talkin' espresso machine costs here:-)
Search the 'net and find one that looks cool so it won't really matter
whether you like to use it for brewing or not.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
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86) From: Barry Luterman
OK talked me into it. Just have a feeling its going to be more stuff on the
shelf that will only occasionally get used. Thought I could at least trade
off some other stuff that only occasionally gets used. When I convince my
wife to retire and move back to the mainland you are going to see a heck of
a tradition offering. We can't move with all this stuff. Playing poker
tonight.
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87) From: Frank Awbrey
Move back to the states???? Why???? :>)
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88) From: Seth Grandeau
Um...Frank...Hawaii is a state. :)
By the way, Barry, please put my name in for the Hawaiian House Tradition
Offering!
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89) From: Barry Luterman
Your in right after Central Pacific Bank. They are my partners.
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90) From: Barry Luterman
Frank We call the rest of The US the mainland while Alaskans refer to it as
the lower 48. However, a New Yorker's view of the US is NY,Chicago, Vegas
and LA.
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91) From: Lynne
And Boston's view is... Boston ... (that @#$!# NY)... a whole lot of open
space ... and California.
;P
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92) From: Frank Awbrey
Gosh, you guys don't give anybody a break do you?:>)  Actually, right after
I hit "send", I realized that Barry had written "mainland" and not the
states, but was too late for me to do anything.
Go on, keep it coming. I can take it (I think).
Frank
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93) From: Dave
On Fri, Mar 14, 2008 at 11:57 AM, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>
Ummmm.... NY? Chicago? Whazzat? ;-)
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94) From: Bob Hazen
Up here, some of us refer to Oregon as Baha Washington....

95) From: Bill
I like living in a "fly-over" state.  Y'all can just keep forgetting about
us!  Least-populous state in the union!bill in cheyenne
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96) From: Brian Kamnetz
I agree with miKe that the Musa model moka pot that Tom currently
carries isn't as spiffy looking as the Class was, because it isn't
shiny. But, on the other hand, I think the Musa profile (much wider,
flat bottom) is more functional on a gas stove because it offers more
surface for the flame to heat. The Class, which was more rounded on
the bottom, offers a smaller area for the flame. FWIW, I personally
like the shape of the Musa more, but liked the shiny surface of the
Class.
Brian
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97) From: Barry Luterman
OK I ordered a pot today. Played poker last night and won enough to pay for
it plus almost half a La Marzocco GS3. Best night I 've had in a
while. It.sgood to have a goal.
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98) From: Floyd Lozano
if $3000 is a friendly poker game, you have rich friends, or very
unhappy ones ;)
-F
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99) From: Barry Luterman
Never said it was a friendly game. With my friends I drink coffee
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100) From: Brett Mason
Friendly is when you say "Thank You" at the end of the night...
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101) From: Barry Luterman
In my game saying thank you at the end of the night would be considered
smart ass and rude. You would be kicking a guy when he is down. That's the
difference.
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102) From: Bill
I play poker with friends and I would never say thank you, either.
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103) From: Brett Mason
Where I come from, we say thank you at the end of the evening - as in:
Thanks for the game, let's play again....
Certainly never intend to be rude, or kick a man when he's down...
Brett
On 3/16/08, Bill  wrote:
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Cheers,
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104) From: Tom Ulmer
Playing for competition, fun, or money are mutually exclusive. If I just
took a few hundred dollars from you with an improbable small straight over
your three queens on the river I'm sure a cordial thank you would take a bit
of the sting away.
Cheers.


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