HomeRoast Digest


Topic: nice fooling-around espresso blend (19 msgs / 400 lines)
1) From: David Lewis
I was playing around the other day, and blended one part Nanga Farms 
robusta, two parts Maui Moka, and five parts Monkey Blend. Roasted it 
longer than I've ever taken a roast: 90 seconds into second crack. 
(This is with the HWP, 5 seconds cool at first crack and 90 seconds 
afterwards, so the total roast time was about 13 minutes). A few 
spots of oil that re-absorbed during cooling. Because of the 
relatively dark roast, I had to lower the brew temperature by 6 C. 
The resulting shot was absolutely delicious. Extreme chocolate, 
wonderful body.
Best,
	David
-- 
"To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or 
that we are to stand by the President right or wrong, is not only 
unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American 
public."
     -- Theodore Roosevelt
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Ed Needham
David...Is that the peaberry Maui Moka or the regular bean?  If not the
peaberry, email me off list.  I'd like to know where you got it.
Thanks
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

3) From: Scott Jensen
I have never heard of lowering the temperature for a dark roast.  Is this
common practice or some personal experimenting you have done?
Scott
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Charlie Herlihy
--- Scott Jensen  wrote:
<Snip>
  I was wondering the same thing, never heard of lowering brew
temp for darker roasts. And that roast didn't even sound *that*
dark. I know that the Maui Moka I roasted went racing to dark
almost too fast (soft, low elevation bean) but what a chocolate
bomb!  So-how low do you lower the brew temp?
Charlie
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Y! Web Hosting - Let the expert host your web sitehttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://webhosting.yahoo.com/homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: Jim Garlits
In a drum roaster, in many cases depending on the bean, if you want a darker
roast you should back off the heat later in the roast so they don't oil up
and chip.  You don't ever want the beans to oil up in your roaster and there
should be very few chips flying off.  The majority of the beans in the batch
should be dark, smooth and flawless.  If you leave the temp high and just
dump them, you'll get a bad batch.  That is something you don't have much
control over with a small fluidized bed roaster.  But with the larger
commercial machines, you can control it.  People who have been roasting for
years know more tricks, and I can't claim such extensive knowledge, but I do
know that with the machine I was working with, backing off the heat for a
darker roast was often desirable.  And the beans oiled up fine as they
rested, after I dumped them.
Jim G.

6) From: Charlie Herlihy
 Exactly correct, Jim.  David's post mentioned lowering BREW
temp for darker roasts, which is what Scott and I were wondering
about.
Charlie
--- Jim Garlits  wrote:
<Snip>
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Y! Web Hosting - Let the expert host your web sitehttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://webhosting.yahoo.com/homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: David Lewis
At 5:14 AM -0500 10/21/02, Scott Jensen wrote:
<Snip>
I think Schomer talks about it; I certainly didn't make it up. But 
yes, it seems to be a general rule. Too cold a brewing temperature 
will taste sour; too hot will taste bitter. A darker roast will, in 
general, cross that line at a lower temperature. For instance, most 
of my roasts are sort of aggressive Full City: i usually stop Yauco 
Selecto about fifteen or twenty seconds into second crack, and 
Malabar Gold about 35 seconds into second crack. Those roasts require 
me to set my Techno brew temperature to a code of six, whereas this 
roast tasted very bitter at that temperature and delicious at a code 
of three. Who knows what the absolute temperature is at that point, 
but the relative temperature is 6 C.
Best,
	David
-- 
"To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or 
that we are to stand by the President right or wrong, is not only 
unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American 
public."
     -- Theodore Roosevelt
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

8) From: Jim Schulman
I've heard of this as a general rule as well. Moreover 
it works for me. Too bright? Brew hotter. Too bitter? 
Brew colder.
Jim
On 21 Oct 2002 at 18:19, David Lewis wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

9) From: Rick Farris
Jim wrote:
<Snip>
Heh.  I'm currently living at an altitude of about 5,000 feet.  At best I
can get water just a hair over 200.  You wouldn't believe the hoops I jump
through to make good filter (Chemex) coffee.  I actually boil four separate
batches of water: One to pre-heat the Chemex, and then three pour-overs,
because otherwise the water cools too much to extract correctly.  I'm also
looking for a job at an observatory at an altitude of 10,470 feet.  Geez,
louise, I guess I'm looking at toddy coffee.  Luckily I would only spend
"significant" portions of time up there, whatever that means.
Has anyone tried making their own instant?  Or how about making coffee
concentrate?  How long does it keep?  Under what conditions?
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

10) From: Jim Schulman
Can't have lousy coffee accompanying the splendors of the universe; it 
would definitely clash. 
The low range for brewing is 90C or 194F, which should still come in 
under your boiling point. In Italy at least, that's where the Neapolitans 
brew their darker roasts (not *$, more like Peet's). If you can't adapt 
your brewing temperature to your roast and blend, you might experiment 
adapting roast and blend to the brewing temperature you're stuck with.
Good luck on getting the post.
Jim
On 21 Oct 2002 at 23:01, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

11) From: Dan Bollinger
Rick, You might have to get an espresso machine and make Americanos.  The
added pressure in the boiler will let you increase the brewing temperature.
Dan

12) From: EskWIRED
 I'm also
<Snip>
Maybe you could invent some kind of a modified pressure cooker which would
release the pressure through the coffee at 205?  Maybe start with a mokka
pot and go from there?
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

13) From: Andrew J. Lynn
EskWIRED wrote:
<Snip>
That doesn't sound like it would work.  IIRC, if you use pressure to 
jack up the boiling point then release the pressure too quickly you have 
a superheated liquid (above the boiling point, which is unstable), and 
if you give that an excuse to start a phase change (adding a bunch of 
ground coffee is probably a good excuse) you'll get rapid conversion to 
steam, which is dangerous and lowers the water temperature to under the 
boiling point anyway.
Still, increasing pressure is your best way to increase boiling point. 
 You might try building an airlock in your kitchen :)
Out of curiosity, does being at high altitude change your roast?  Do you 
get a faster/cooler first crack?
Andy Lynn, new on the scene
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: John Abbott
Rick,
  I've read several replies to this, and don't disagree with any. But at
that altitude you may want to consider a well constructed thermos. I have a
thermos that will keep coffee hot for about 4 hours, hot enough to drink for
about 3 more. When I commuted 2 hours each way, I stuffed two of those in my
car. Drank one going, one returning.
Good luck on getting the position - adds force to the expression "moving on
up."
John

15) From: Rick Farris
Dan wrote:
<Snip>
I suppose I could take my Livia up there....  Never thought of it as
portable.  Then again, I suppose I could get a cheap steam toy and use it
for Americanos...
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

16) From: Rick Farris
EskWIRED wrote:
<Snip>
Dan mentioned that, also.  Actually he suggested an espresso machine.  I'm
thinking steam toy.
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

17) From: Rick Farris
Andy wrote:
<Snip>
We've talked about this before, and one of the theories suggests that the
coffee puck would be part of the pressure system and that the high
temperature water would either a) flash to steam *after* it leaves the puck,
or b) lose temperature to the point where it is liquid as it travels through
the puck.  If I get this job, I'll experiment and report back.
<Snip>
Funny you should ask.  When I moved here (Arizona) from San Diego earlier
this year, my roasts went from 9- to 10- minutes to 4- to 5- minutes.
However, in addition to the change in altitude, the humidity dropped about
50 points, so I'm pretty sure humidity has an effect, also.
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

18) From: Rick Farris
John wrote:
<Snip>
I'm looking at the wide-mouth Zojirushi that Tom sells, with the 6-cup
Melitta filter holder, and brewing directly into the vacuum bottle.  But...
that won't help in this situation.  The observatory is located about 120
miles out in the boonies.  When you go up there you stay for a week or two.
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

19) From: jim gundlach
Rick,
     I found that the Moca pot would produce a decent espresso at about 
7,000 ft.  The lower atmospheric pressure reduced the temperature at 
which water boils to the degree that a gentle heat did not bring the 
temperature up to the point that it burned the coffee.  The steam toy 
might well work at 11,000 or so ft.
Jim Gundlach
On Tuesday, October 22, 2002, at 02:03 PM, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


HomeRoast Digest