HomeRoast Digest


Topic: grinder advice (3 msgs / 59 lines)
1) From: AlChemist John
This is from a friend of AlChemist John, who has offered me access to this 
wonderful world of coffee knowledge.
Although I have never owned a manual coffee grinder, I have seen the wooden 
box mill (Zass @ SM)with the drawer for the grounds, and thought the drawer 
looked difficult to clean, and small enough to be easily overloaded when 
trying to grind enough for a large pot of coffee.  Is that the case?
Recently, I have seen a hand mill with burrs that drops the grounds into a 
wide ceramic jar.  This would seem to be easier to clean, although, one 
can't just knock the upside down jar to drop the grounds out like one might 
(?) with the wood drawer.
I am interested in finding something to manually grind coffee, quickly 
(under a couple minutes) for French press, Starbucks drip machine and an 
espresso maker (mostly FP, occasionally the other, not switching a 
lot).  We only make coffee on the weekends.  Does anyone have any 
experience I can learn from before I make my purchase?  Thank you for your 
time, Andrea
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2) From: TFisher511
Andrea,
I have three Zassenhaus coffee mills and they are well constructed and 
functional. My favorite is the Model 169DG because it is a beautiful grinder 
and a real pleasure to use. 
The drawer will overflow if you grind more than 2 coffee scoops at a time (2 
x 1/8 cup) so I just add 2 scoops of coffee, grind and dump, then repeat as 
necessary. For vac, drip or French press it normally takes less than two 
minutes to grind a sufficient amount for brewing.
The drawer cannot be washed, but I have found just tapping it on my hand to 
clear the coffee dust or wiping the drawer with a slightly damp cloth for 
cleaning to be sufficient. I actually use a Rocky during the workweek but 
drag out the 169DG every weekend just for the pleasure. It was the search for 
a good hand grinder that got me started in this home roasting experience and 
I still enjoy that part of the coffee making process.
Good luck in your choice,
Terry F
 alchemist writes:
<Snip>

3) From: James Gundlach
The Zass is difficult to dial in to a good espresso grind.  Once you 
get it there, you generally don't want to change it.  You especially 
don't want your son-in-law readjusting it because he has to have 
something in his hands to play with.   It causes you to bite your 
tongue.
Jim Gundlach
On Monday, October 28, 2002, at 08:52 PM, AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
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