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Topic: Melting the Popper (10 msgs / 286 lines)
1) From: Daniel Rock
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ive read and dreamed of the perfect cup. So I paid attention and =
pulled
together all the little its and bits. Found a supplier of green beans
(hasbeans.ca), bought the popper (cheapie Westinghouse 1200w with the
vents on the side) and took the plunge. I did my best and it went kind
of off kilter. The beans took forever to reach 1st crack (almost 5
minutes) and then another five before they got started getting a dark
roast. It all seemed a little funny especially when I went to take the
top of the popper and I noticed that it was melting and sagging from the
heat. What in the blazes, almost that is. What did I do wrong? Too
little coffee? (only a  of a cup)? Lousy pumper? If I use a =
thermometer
what should the temp be? Also some the beans seemed to be almost tan
whereas others had little black marks on them where the corners seemed
to have scorched and popped apart. The beans seemed to swirl about
properly? All in all it was a bit of fun but, now I d like to roast a
good cup of coffee instead of the popper itself!
 
            Dan
 
 

2) From: Chris Beck
Try 1/2 cup in the popper and see what happens.  The 'melting' top is 
pretty common on some poppers, but the West Bend Poppery II seems to 
have a rather immune-to-melting top - mine has survived well over 100 
roasts.  It's totally, permanently discolored brown (it started clear), 
but it's reasonably straight.  It just depends on the type of plastic 
your top is molded from. Don't sweat it.  Just take the top off and 
stick a soup can in a ways to extend the roast chamber.
Chris
Daniel Rock wrote:
<Snip>
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3) From: jim gundlach
The hot air poppers are counter intuitive.  You add more beans to make =
the roast hotter and faster.  There is a limit because the beans need 
to agitate.  It has been a couple of years since I used one but I found =
that the amount of beans that just barely moved at start and required a =
little stirring at first was about right.
  Jim Gundlach
  roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
On Tuesday, October 29, 2002, at 05:34 PM, Daniel Rock wrote:
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pumper? 
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4) From: Daniel Rock
I can kind of picture that but, don't the beans roast uneven. Should I
shake it as well as let it agitate on it's own.

5) From: James Gundlach
On Tuesday, October 29, 2002, at 07:34 PM, Daniel Rock wrote:
<Snip>
I had to do a little shaking and stirring at first but as soon as the 
beans dried a bit and became a bit less heavy, they agitated on their 
own through the rest of the roast.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
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6) From: Steve Penno
snip  <...It all seemed a little funny especially when I went to take the
top of the popper and I noticed that it was melting and sagging from the
heat. ..> snip
I found that the top on my popper is a very accurate indicator of second =
crack. When the top gets soft I know that second crack is only a few second=
s=
 away! (I don't use the plastic top now though because my popper is a bit =
under-powered and I use a tin can 'chimney' so that I can put more beans =
in.)
Steve
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7) From: Darren Conrad
Daniel,
I have probably the same White Westinghouse 1200W popper as you and have also
noticed that the clear plastic cover has started melting.  This is especially
apparent in the slotted vents at the front, mine is now discolored brown and
sagging with small bubbles running though it.  The majority of the cover has
remained intact and does get quite hot after repeated roasts, but is still
working for me.
The first roast in the cold popper usually takes 4-5 minutes to reach first
crack, then 2nd crack at around 8-9 minutes.  After it's warmed up from the
first roast, the next ones go a little faster.  I've never experienced anything
like charred edges on my beans, they are usually evenly colored with perhaps
the 1-2 odd beans that I pick out.  I find that a slightly mounded 1/2
measuring cup works best for this popper, are you using about this much?  As
others mentioned, you may need to stir the beans a little at first until they
lose some moisture and start to spin fluidly.
Enjoy your roasting!
Darren
Daniel Rock wrote:
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8) From: Daniel Rock
Darren, you have the same model for sure and as I was browsing about the
stores today I also saw it called a Togo (The Bay) and a Kenmore
(Sears).. I will try the half cup. Somewhere in the Sweet Maria's info
page, I missed the part about watch out for the goo. It's all good fun!
Anyway what's this tin can chimmney mod?
	Dan

9) From: Daniel Rock
I think I understand the problem with my beans in that they were mottled
and unevenly roasted. I was doing Sumatra's as my first and from  Sweet
Maria's description they tend to look uneven when roasting and that
leads to a tendency to go overlong in order  to compensate. I did and
yesterday when I tried it was reminiscent of matchsticks, not that I've
made coffee of them or anything (matchsticks that is)
 Dan
"I've never experienced anything
like charred edges on my beans, they are usually evenly colored with
perhaps
the 1-2 odd beans that I pick out.  "
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10) From: Jim Garlits
Burnt bean ends is typically a phenomenon that pertains to drum roasters.  I
talked to a coffee supply salesman who used to be a roaster (bad sign...if
you're good at roasting and the company takes it seriously, there's no way
they're going to put you on a route truck) and he said thats how he
identified full city roast.  Ewwww.
Jim G.


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