HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Royal Coffee Make--vacuum balance (6 msgs / 200 lines)
1) From: Mark Neuhausen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
With Santa soon visiting, my family has asked that I put together a list =
for myself.  Two years ago was all low and slow barbecue stuff, last =
year was a mix of espresso and barbecue (I know, not quite the taste of =
beer and barbecue), and this year will be coffee and more coffee items.  =
A Hearthware Gourmet is a candidate, and also a Royal Coffee Maker.  =
Does anyone have experience with one?  Is it worth the visual =
experience?  Beyond the visual, I figure vacuum coffee is vacuum coffee.
-Mark

2) From: Mark A. Chalkley
Mark,
Go tohttp://www.coffeegeek.com/detailed/balancebrewersand look at
Mark Prince's excellent review (and follow the instructions at the end
on e-mailing Patrick to see if he has any left at the special price -
they were running low when I got mine a few weeks ago).
Also, go tohttp://www.coffeegeek.com/reviews/vacpots/royaland look
at the reviews there.  There are half a dozen reviews there by various
other folks (including me, but don't let that stop you...).
That should tell you pretty much all you want to know, but if there's
anything else, just ask!
Mark C.
On Wednesday, October 30, 2002, 1:35:54 PM, you wrote:
MN> With Santa soon visiting, my family has asked that I put together a list for myself.  Two years ago was all low and slow barbecue stuff, last year was a mix of espresso and barbecue (I know, not
MN> quite the taste of beer and barbecue), and this year will be coffee and more coffee items.  A Hearthware Gourmet is a candidate, and also a Royal Coffee Maker.  Does anyone have experience with
MN> one?  Is it worth the visual experience?  Beyond the visual, I figure vacuum coffee is vacuum coffee.
MN> -Mark
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: David Marley
I am assuming you mean the royal balance brewer.  There is a thorough review
on Coffeegeek.com but i'll give you my quick take on it.  A close friend of
mine loves his!
Pluses-
Awesome presentation
Excellent flavor (really close to Cona's)
Minuses
Pain in the rear to clean!
Expensive
If you are buying this for an everyday brewer your crazy.  This think is
meant for dinner parties where you want to show off your home roasted
coffee.  The Royal has lots of copper so you have to watch out for
scratching and what you use to clean it.  It's like investing in a piece of
art with the Royal brewer!  Personally, i'd take a Cona or Hario over it (I
could get 3-4 for the price).  You still get a really cool dinner party
presentation without some of the headaches.
David Marley

4) From: Owen Davies
Mark Neuhausen asked:
<Snip>
No experience with it (of course), but I have seen it discussed somewhere.
Probably at alt.coffee, where I am now working my way through the 15,000-
odd messages still stored in my ISP's server.  The verdict seemed to be that
it was wonderful drama for a dinner party or something, but functionally
defective.  Seems that it cuts off the flame and pulls the coffee down as
soon
as the water is out of the reservoir, which is significantly too soon, and
there
is no way to extend the brewing time.
Great looking, though.
Owen Davies
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5) From: Mark A. Chalkley
Hmmm, well, "functionally defective" is a bit harsh a phrase to use on
a coffee maker that right out of the box is probably the second best
coffee maker I've ever used, and that's a bunch (second only to the
Hario vac pot).
And for the price of $1.88 (plus tax) worth of cork coasters from
Wally-world, a pair of scissors (which hopefully you already own) and
a very small amount of the glue of your choice (which you also
hopefully already own), enough of its "defects" can be cured that it
makes coffee just as good as the Hario.  Factor in a small amount of
the visual appeal of the thing just sitting there, another dab of the
beauty of it working, and just a touch of the wow factor for its
uniqueness, and the coffee ends up tasting better than any I've brewed
in anything else.
In fact, when I write the follow-up to my review on CoffeeGeek, I'll
probably have played with the Royal enough to be able to say that
there's really very little need to play with the height of the glass
(depending on the variances due to its being handblown, of course)
unless you're a nut (which I am) and just like messing with things
(which I do).  For that matter, if you've got a decent grinder (that
isn't worn out and producing "dust"), I'm finding out, it's quite easy
to control the extraction times extremely well with the grind.  With
my last two pots using the Zass to grind the coffee, I got extraction
times of 4:45 and 4:20, with almost no sediment.  So, that's actually
too long, but easily remedied by using a bit coarser grind (which is
why the second was shorter than the first, and the next will be
shorter still, I'm sure, as I get the Zass "dialed in").
All in all, I think Patrick has got the Royal pretty well nailed down.
The criticisms are due to its closeness to perfection - that makes
what would most certainly be very nit-picky complaints with any other
brewer sound like glaring faults with the Royal, which is unfortunate.
Mark C.
On Wednesday, October 30, 2002, 6:12:29 PM, Owen Davies wrote:
OD> No experience with it (of course), but I have seen it discussed
OD> somewhere. Probably at alt.coffee, where I am now working my way
OD> through the 15,000- odd messages still stored in my ISP's server.
OD> The verdict seemed to be that it was wonderful drama for a dinner
OD> party or something, but functionally defective.  Seems that it
OD> cuts off the flame and pulls the coffee down as soon as the water
OD> is out of the reservoir, which is significantly too soon, and
OD> there is no way to extend the brewing time.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: Mark A. Chalkley
I use the Royal as my everyday brewer but I suppose that only
strengthens your point, because I _am_ crazy. ;>)
The scratching issue is easily avoided, as long as you know about it
beforehand.
Using a good metal polish, like Peek or Maas, also eliminates the need
to clean it very often.  I've used mine every day for the last three
weeks or so without even removing the pot from the stand, much less
cleaning it (on the outside, of course).  Cleaning the whole thing
after brewing takes a minute or so longer than the Hario, because you
have to flush the pot with water, but it's no big deal at all.
Mark C.
On Wednesday, October 30, 2002, 6:08:08 PM, David Marley wrote:
DM> I am assuming you mean the royal balance brewer.  There is a thorough review
DM> on Coffeegeek.com but i'll give you my quick take on it.  A close friend of
DM> mine loves his!
DM> Pluses-
DM> Awesome presentation
DM> Excellent flavor (really close to Cona's)
DM> Minuses
DM> Pain in the rear to clean!
DM> Expensive
DM> If you are buying this for an everyday brewer your crazy.  This think is
DM> meant for dinner parties where you want to show off your home roasted
DM> coffee.  The Royal has lots of copper so you have to watch out for
DM> scratching and what you use to clean it.  It's like investing in a piece of
DM> art with the Royal brewer!  Personally, i'd take a Cona or Hario over it (I
DM> could get 3-4 for the price).  You still get a really cool dinner party
DM> presentation without some of the headaches.
DM> David Marley
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


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