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Topic: Back to "No good Foam" (9 msgs / 206 lines)
1) From: Fritz Curtis
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Thanks to everybody who helped with my foam problem
Here are some of the things i learned
I am using a pasquini Livia 90 Auto
    Cold milk works well, Warm does not
    Non fat foams better but has less flavor than whole milk ( Whole Milk
for me)
     Open the steam wand and blow out any water that has accumulated,
It might be a TBL
Fill a very cold pitcher with 1/3  cold milk
Just put the steam wand tip under for a couple of seconds, then
 do the "move it all about dance"
After maybe 20 sec  or so it will be 150 to 160 deg. and foam.
The part that helps me is the change in sound when it turns to foam, a
definite hollow sound. When i hear that its done.
I am not an expert yet but maybe someone else can use my input
Thanks for all the help everyone

2) From: dewardh
Fritz:
<Snip>
definite hollow sound. When i hear that its done.
That change in sound has less to do with "foam" than it does with temperature . 
.. . you've discovered the "steam thermometer"  (try it with water . . . 
you'll see).  What happens is that as the steam blows into the milk/water it 
forms "bubbles" (of steam) in the liquid (different from the entrapped air that 
makes "foam", and why you only get persistent "foam" when the jets are near the 
surface, pulling air in with them).  Those bubbles then give up heat to the 
liquid, the steam in them condenses, and the bubbles (noisily) collapse.  The 
colder the liquid the quicker the collapse and the higher the "pitch" of the 
resulting "noise".  Eventually (once the liquid is warm enough, and the "sound" 
a low "rumble") the bubbles persist long enough to make it to the surface and 
splash hot milk/water all over your hand.  It's good to stop before that . . . 
.
Deward
Ps.  there is some interesting protein chemistry that happens on the surface of 
those short lived bubbles, where the milk gets (briefly) much hotter than the 
bulk liquid.  that's why "steamed milk" has a different taste/texture from milk 
heated more slowly to the same temperature in a pan on the stove . . .
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3) From: Jim Garlits
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A couple of things you might want to try, that produce better froth (not =
foam!  never ever ever say foam, its froth!).  If your wand produces =
sufficient pressure, don't slosh the milk around too much.  Once you get =
the milk "rolling" that is enough movement and you'll get more =
consistant heat build-up.  One or two percent milk works best for us, =
the fats in whole milk will scorch before lower fat milks will.  Soy =
milk is good too, if you like the taste.  160 is pretty cool for my =
taste.  You'll be able to tell from feel after awhile, or if you don't =
have a thermometer, exactly where you like it.  I only recommend =
stainless steel frothing pitchers.
Jim Garlits

4) From: Simpson
You mean the bazillion people who refer daily to 'microfoam' are wrong?
'Froth' implies stiff peaks that have been likened to 'kapok'... a good
description IMO. (Micro)foam has been described as 'milk chiffon'. I'll
have some of *that* foam, please.
Ted
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On 11/3/2002 at 5:45 PM Jim Garlits wrote:
<Snip>
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5) From: Charlie Herlihy
 Since this subject has come up again I'd like to share a
discovery that my 12 year old son came up with for his cappas
and lattes-a little cold milk in a french press, work the
plunger up and down for 20 seconds or so and voila, the
smoothest microfoam ever. Like velvet. Yes, it cools the coffee
some, being cold, but you can drink it quicker, and it never
fails to make perfect microfoam, not stiff froth. Try it. Made
incredible iced cappas...
Charlie
--- Simpson  wrote:
<Snip>
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6) From: Owen Davies
Charlie Herlihy wrote:
<Snip>
Bodum produces a small device much like a French press
for this purpose.  The screen appears to be finer-grained
than the coffee makers.
Owen Davies
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7) From: Charlie Herlihy
--- Owen Davies  wrote:
<Snip>
 I've read about them here on the list, but there's no need to
get one if you already have a FP. The boy also wows his friends
with super creamy chocolate milks frothing with it.
Charlie
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8) From: Scott Jensen
I've had good success using hot milk as well, I have one we bought while in
Italy, they seem to be fairly common over there.  It sure impresses everyone
I show it too.
Scott
<Snip>
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9) From: Jim Garlits
Okay...okay...k..k.k.  No need to froth at the mouth.  :)  If you order a
cafe latte, it'll have a bit of (cringe) foam on it.  But if you get a
cappuccino from me, it will have perfect, cling to the sides of the cup,
smooth as silk froth that wasn't spooned into your cup, but poured right
from the pitcher with a quick flick of the wrist.  The froth I practiced for
hours on end amid piles of empty milk cartons to achieve.  And if you
insisted on calling it foam, I'd smile and say, "customer's always
right...even when 'ez wrong."  Froth, foam...its all good.
Jim Garlits


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