HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Could I roast coffee with a clothes dryer?? (16 msgs / 285 lines)
1) From: Eric B. Stauffer
I'm only half-way serious. The other day the heating element went out on our
Maytag dryer. I ordered the part to replace it. Basically, it was a great
big spring-like heating element that was strung through a pipe about 4" in
diameter and a foot or so long.
You apply 110v to the element, it heats up. VERY hot. A squirrel cage blower
moves air over the element and into the dryer. I was wondering if there
would be some way to adapt it to roast coffee -- more than the 3/4 of a cup
at a time that my Poppery Mark I roasts.  Kind of like rip the dryer apart
and use just the blower and element. You would need to fabriate a drum in
which to roast the coffee. Kind of like a super heat gun. With some work, I
think this might fly.
Just a thought.
Eric
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2) From: Dan Bollinger
Clothes dryers I've worked on use split 220V.  They switch between 110 and
220 to give you high and low heat. You might check the schematic and figure
out how they do that.  Dan

3) From: Eric B. Stauffer
Clearly mine is 220 but only one leg goes to the element (I have a single
heat dryer) and the other to the drum motor and blower. I seriously think
this possible. I may talk to someone in the shops at work to see if they
could fabricate what would effectively be an oversize hot air popper drum.

4) From: dewardh
Eric:
<Snip>
and use just the blower and element. You would need to fabriate a drum in
which to roast the coffee.
Don't even rip the dryer apart . . . use it "as-is".  Pack a bale of fiberglass 
insulation around it (well, you'll have to get the drum drive belt and motor on 
the "cold side" somehow), plug the vent, and cook it till it smokes (to get the 
lint out ).  If it gets over 260-270C, cool it down a bit (easiest to open 
the vent and regulate temperature by airflow, like the Hearthware does), open 
the door, toss in 5 or 10 pounds of coffee, and go for glory  . . . You'll 
have the biggest "drum roaster" on the list .
After that first "proof of concept" batch we'll all give you *plenty* of advice 
on "tidying up the details" . . . 
Deward
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5) From: Gary Zimmerman
Susan wrote:
<Snip>
Tiny little clothes.
-- garyZ
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6) From: Mark A. Chalkley
Barbie doll socks.
On Friday, November 8, 2002, 6:58:28 AM, susan oppenheim wrote:
so> bonsai clothes again?
so> Gary Zimmerman wrote:
<Snip>
so>
so> homeroast mailing list
so>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroasthomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 18:44 11/6/02, Eric B. Stauffer typed:
<Snip>
It might fly.  I thought most dryers ran on some form of 240 though? I have 
often wondered about salvaging from other "dead" appliances to make a high 
capacity, low cost roaster.  I think the only thing you have to lose is 
time and effort.
I have access to a "dead" gas chromatograph at work.  It's temperature 
ramps still work just fine, unfortunately, it runs of 240V.  I guess that 
is what you get for an instrument that can go from ambient to 300 C in 
a  couple of minutes.
Good luck.
BTW, to the electrical types out there, what happens. per se, if you wire a 
240 appliance to 120?
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
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8) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 21:14 11/6/02, dewardh typed:
<Snip>
First "detail", I would expect that "as is" the dryer probably has a 
thermal cutoff switch to prevent fire in case the vent is plugged.
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
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9) From: dewardh
John:
<Snip>
high
capacity, low cost roaster.  I think the only thing you have to lose is
time and effort.
The burner from a gas dryer is almost "ready made" for a drum roaster . . .
<Snip>
240 appliance to 120?
One fourth the power . . . (and you have to re-wire the fan motors, timers, 
etc. also . . .).
Deward
Ps. >I have access to a "dead" gas chromatograph at work.  It's temperature
ramps still work just fine
I've got an old Varian 1440 (110V), but the "roast chamber" isn't very big . . 
..  . . .
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10) From: dewardh
John:
<Snip>
thermal cutoff switch to prevent fire in case the vent is plugged.
well . . . anyone with a "popper" knows what to do about that  . . .
Deward
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11) From: susan oppenheim
could you dry clothes with a coffee roaster
"Eric B. Stauffer" wrote:
<Snip>
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12) From: Rick Farris
John wrote:
<Snip>
As long as it doesn't draw more than seven or eight amps (1500 watts), go to
Radio Shack and ask them for a 120 -> 240 step up transformer.
<Snip>
That's what we call an "indeterminate result."  It will definitely be bad,
though.  It could range from nothing happening, to smoke.
Some high-end instruments, however, are made to automatically work on any
voltage from about 100Vac to about 260Vac, and 50 or 60 Hz.  Why don't you
go look at the label right next to where the power cord enters the box and
report back on what it says?
-- Rick
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13) From: susan oppenheim
bonsai clothes again?
Gary Zimmerman wrote:
<Snip>
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14) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 09:56 11/7/02, dewardh typed:
<Snip>
The ones I have access to are Perkin Elmer Sigma 3b's.  The "roast chamber" 
is about 12" x 12" with the fan blowing up from the bottom.  It was for old 
packed columns.  I do really wonder about taking up the offer of the 
company and taking it but I have not the faintest idea about rewiring it 
for 120V.  Oh well....
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
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15) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 22:07 11/7/02, Rick Farris typed:
<Snip>
Will do, as I am interested also, but it will NOT be for about a week as 
the instrument is across town  in storage from where I work.  My memory 
(fallible though it is about this kind of thing) is that this type of older 
instrument is not high end simply due to its age.  I'll report back.
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
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16) From: dewardh
John:
<Snip>
of older
instrument is not high end simply due to its age.
It's not a question of "high end" . . . it's simply that the heating element in 
the oven is 220V.  There may have been a 110V version (and it's even possible 
(though unlikely) that yours is "convertable" by re-wiring the heater(s)).  The 
oven in my Varian is, as I recall (it's not right at hand, either), about 
6x6x10 inches . . . (are the PE's dual column?) and it pretty much *requires* a 
dedicated 110V circuit.  I suppose I ought to dig it out, gas it up, and see if 
it still works, just for old times sake . . . .
Deward
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