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Topic: stir crazy temp (7 msgs / 247 lines)
1) From: Roy Gordon
Does anyone know (or have an idea) how hot the Westbend stir crazy gets?
I've been roasting with the turbo oven/stir crazy combo for several months 
now, with pretty good success.  I'm hoping I can further refine the 
roasting if I actually knew how hot the stir crazy unit gets.
TIA.
-- Roy
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2) From: Roy Gordon
I sent an email to Westbend.  They said:
The temp of base at time of popping is 450 - 520 degrees.
I don't understand this.  Wouldn't this be enough to roast the beans by 
itself?   Shouldn't it be a roast to the black death then if I have the 
turbo oven at 400?  But this doesn't happen.
Anyone have an explanation?
TIA.
-- Roy
<Snip>

3) From: Ed Needham
It's most likely an issue of heat transfer.  The hard, flat surface may be
525 degrees but it does not do a really good job of transferring the heat to
the constantly moving beans.  It only roasts one point on each bean at a
time.  Popcorn, on the other hand has the oil as a medium for transferring
the heat more efficiently.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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4) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
From: Roy Gordon 
Subject: +stir crazy temp
Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 14:40:11 -0800
<Snip>
It's like trying to measure how much juice is in battery by measuring
voltage without putting a load. Just because the plate's temperature
is 400F, it doesn't mean it is capable of making the bean temperature
400F in a reasonable amount of time, especially through dry contact.
Turbo Oven is very powerful in transferring the heat to the bean
through heating the air in the chamber and making a good amount of
turbulence (as well as radiating the heat, but to a lesser extent).
One main difference between hot air popcorn popper and Turbo Oven is
that the chamber is nearly closed with Turbo Oven, making it more
efficient, allowing to roast larger quantity at a time.
I now use Stir Crazy only as a stirrer. (I cut the wire going to the
heater.) I can control the temperature much better without Stir
Crazy's heater. With Stir Crazy's heater, roast tends to go too fast
when I want to get full city+ to French. With some pre heating to 150C
or so, I can get very nice city roast in about 8 minutes, or French
roast in 15 minutes, and anywhere between. Of course, I *can* rush or
prolong further if I want.
I've been busy with my main business and photography while sampling
excellent teas so I didn't make much action in coffee department. But
I hope to update my Turbo Oven roasting page to include my latest
(which is quite old) Turbo Crazy.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)
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5) From: Chris Beck
I picked up a Turbo oven (the Betty Crocker version) some time ago to 
experiment.  Stock, it's not a good roaster.  The air temperature varies 
quite a bit from the center of the oven to the outside wall due to the 
cyclonic action of the fan (used a thermocouple probe to measure). 
Also, without a reliable way to agitate the beans, the roast is very 
uneven, and more than 2/3 cup roasts poorly.
The Stir portion of the Stircrazy would solve that issue, but it's still 
a sub-optimal solution.  I want to find a way to install a perf. drum or 
other agitating arrangement into the Turbo oven.
But, in the 'bean'time, I've purchased an Alp for my espresso roasting 
needs.  The Turbo oven does a mean pork roast, however!
Chris
Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX wrote:
<Snip>
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6) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
Saying Turbo Oven is not a good coffee roaster is like saying a very
goode knife is not a good apple peeler.
Anyway, drum agitation is used in roasting devices partly because of
its high capacity and consistently even result. However, people who
tried oven roasting and work roasting know that uneven result can be
*better* than some even roasts (of course, to their taste). So keep
that in mind. People who roast with burning charcoal know that the
flavor is noticeably different from hot air roasted coffee. This is
probably because that the contribution of radiant heat is relatively
high.
One limitation of oven roasting is that it can be very
messy. Limitation of wok roasting is that it's also messy and also
difficult to control to the exact degree of roast. Agitation is the
key in preventing unacceptably uneven result with either method.
So, naturally, I combined wok roasting and Turbo Oven. I simply put
about 1.5 cups of bean in 12" hard anodized aluminum pan with no
non-stick coating, which is flat bottomed. I placed it on stove top,
in a high gas flame. At the same time, I placed Turbo Oven set at 150C
in place of the lid for the pan. When the thermostat of Turbo Oven
shuts off, I turn down the flame to very weak level.  At about the
fifth minute, turn the thermostat up to about 200C, with same
agitation. I start hearing nice first crack, and it goes away. When I
feel like I want to hear the second crack, I turn the heat up to 250C
on Turbo Oven, and also to the medium heat on the gas flame.
During the entire period, I lift up the assembly with oven mitts and
rock for a few seconds every minute. This is *much* easier than with a
dish in the Pyrex glass bowl that comes with Turbo Oven. You simply
make a big rocking motion back and forth, maybe swirl once or twice,
and that's it -- you don't spill anything.
The result is surprisingly even. If you prefer oven, wok or
Alpenroaest instead of hot air roasted coffee, I bet you'll love the
cup, but I'll let you try it and decide for yourself.  It's a very
good oven/wok roast with much less skill and discipline required to
succeed.
By the way, I came up with this idea while I was cooking spare ribs.
I started with braising for first five minutes, and I roasted from top
with Turbo Oven for the rest. Now I think this same technique should
be very well applicable for a range of stuff from sunny side up to
very thick steak. Anyway, it worked very well on coffee!!
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: dewardh
Ryuji:
<Snip>
about 1.5 cups of bean in 12" hard anodized aluminum pan with no
non-stick coating, which is flat bottomed.
Well, that would be "pan and air" roasting, but why quibble . . . 
<Snip>
in a high gas flame. At the same time, I placed Turbo Oven set at 150C
in place of the lid for the pan. When the thermostat of Turbo Oven
shuts off, I turn down the flame to very weak level.
The "drying" stage . . . if this stage is too short drying will be uneven 
(resulting in a more extended first crack, among other things), if long enough 
then more of the beans will "go off" at the same time, making first crack short 
(and more pronounced).
<Snip>
agitation. I start hearing nice first crack, and it goes away.
The "ramp" to first crack . . . which should happen around 190C.  As with air 
roasting the Turbo Oven (set at 200C), and perhaps even the pan, are at this 
point taking heat *from* the beans to keep them from "self heating" straight 
from first into second crack . . .
<Snip>
on Turbo Oven, and also to the medium heat on the gas flame.
The "ramp" to second crack . . . which should happen around 230C.  The timing 
is controlled by you, as one can with an air roaster, rather than left to the 
dynamics of the otherwise self heating bean mass (as in the typical "drum" 
roaster).
<Snip>
It doesn't surprise me at all . . . you are "bunching the batch" at each 
temperature plateau . . . delaying further development in the "leaders" while 
letting the "laggards" catch up.  That goes a *long* way to making up for any 
unevenness in heating/stirring.
<Snip>
Alpenroaest instead of hot air roasted coffee, I bet you'll love the
cup, but I'll let you try it and decide for yourself.
Compared to the "slam, bam, thank you bean" of a Fresh Roast (unmodified) or 
generic popper yes . . . but I'll bet that you'll find far less difference (if 
any difference at all) if you *match the profile* in an air roaster (modified 
to give a similar degree of control).  What difference there might be probably 
comes from partial caramelizing of some bean surfaces . . . a result of contact 
with the (possibly over hot) bottom pan.  Whether that is a "good thing" is, of 
course, a "matter of taste" . . . (and there are ways one could add a surface 
overheating "feature" to an air roaster, should that prove "desirable" . . . 
ways no more "complicated" than a frying pan on a stovetop).
<Snip>
succeed.
It's a good "profile" . . . and just as easy to do with an air roaster once one 
takes control of air temperature (the "function" performed by the thermostat 
your the Turbo Oven, and your adjustment of it during the roast).  I'll bet 
(again ) that as you experiment you find that it's the *roast profile*, far 
more than the roast method that accomplishes the profile, that determines the 
"character" of the roast . . .
Deward
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