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Topic: Color Tiles [was RE: +Favorite Bean] (3 msgs / 99 lines)
1) From: Gary Zimmerman
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I don't think the SCAA tiles are labeled with "city" and "full city" and 
the like.  Just a color number.  (See, for example, http://www.coffeereview.com/interpret_coffee.cfm) You can compare bean and 
grounds colors and have a consistent reference for color, but unless 
everyone agrees that Ag 45 is "full city", the tiles don't work for 
determining those degree descriptions.
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They give everyone a consistent, standard color to work with IF you want to 
use color to describe your roasts and compare, or if someone wants to try 
reproducing your "superb roast with Jampit roasted to Agtron color 
40".  Since the tile set is so expensive, not a lot of folks have 
them.  That's why the effort awhile back to come up with comperable Sherwin 
Williams paint sample chips to do the same thing: get a standard for 
discussing roast colors.
-- garyZ
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Rick Farris
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Gary replied:
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Ah.  So as long as you're referring to a specific bean/harvest, then terms
like "city" and "full city" make sense.  But comparing my Kenya "city" to
your Kona "city" doesn't really have any relevance.
So does that mean that saying "I generally like my coffee roasted to city"
doesn't convey any useful information?  How about "I like my coffee roasted
to the first few snaps of second crack?"
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Ed Needham
A roast can get to a specific color many different ways, and even though it
is the same color, it can be totally different.  Roast the beans fast and hot
in a drum roaster to AG 45.  Roast slow and cool to AG 45.  Roast in an air
roaster to AG 45, etc, etc, etc...  Color is a poor predictor of the roast.
Bean colors, and therefore color chips are really only useful when comparing
roasts from the same batch, using the same technique, and possibly (but less
accurate) roasting the same origin.  Wet and dry beans roast to different
colors at the same stage of roast.  Aged is different that new crop.  Guats
are going to roast differently than Tanzanian Peaberry.
The color chips seem to be useful when documenting roast characteristics, as
one of many roast benchmarks, or in conversation, as a means of comparison.
A sample statement "Man, these Ugandan beans are incredible when I took them
just a few snaps into second crack.  They ended up about an Ag45 color, but
did they ever sing!  I will definitely roast that way again."
A poor usage would be "I like all my beans roasted to an AG45 color.  Those
JBM beans had to roast for a half hour to get that dark."
It seems that some bad batches of a very popular espresso blend were sent out
by a very popular coffee roaster by mistake, and some on alt.coffee posted
about how overroasted and burnt they were.  To clarify matters, an AG color
reference probably would have helped compare the bad batches to what was
intended.
(In fairness to the retailer who sold the coffee, he offered, in a post on
alt.coffee, to replace any beans that customers were dissatisfied with, and
apologized for the mistake.)
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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