HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Newbie (78 msgs / 2058 lines)
1) From: miketom
Hi folks, just bought a HWP from Tom, first foray into roasting.  So 
far I have been lurking and listening;  the HWP seems to be working 
well for me so far.  I see a lot of posts with dark (Full City) 
roasts; how about some favorites in the lighter, more acidy, bright, 
etc. range?  I am a big espresso fan; but a good cup of brew is also 
great.  I saw one poster asking about drip, what do most use to brew 
their coffee?  French press is sort of a hassle on a frequent basis; 
I bought one of Tom's Melitta-style drippers, but haven't figured it 
out yet.  Also, when speaking of the time after 1st C is that the 
beginning or the end?  On the HWP the total crack takes about 1 min. 
and then 2nd C starts about 1-1:30 after that.  Any suggestions?
Thanks,
(Another) Mike

2) From: Kathleen Tinkel
Hi, Mike the Third - 
Like you, I like to roast different beans different ways - some 'full
city,' some much lighter. But with my FreshRoast - and your HWP may be
similar - it's very easy to slip into 2nd crack just because the entire
cycle is so short.
You should find that first crack will begin at different times with
different types of coffee bean. On my FR, a hot machine ran faster than a
cool one, so the first batch might take me 5 minutes overall but a
subsequent roast made soon after the first might take only 4. I made lots
of notes in the beginning just to help figure out the patterns.
Your roaster sounds too fast to me; I had that problem with the FreshRoast
until I plugged it into a power strip, which reduced the voltage slightly.
You might want to consider that - you should get more depth of flavor with
a longer roast.
You time the first crack from its onset. Sometimes you'll get an isolated
single crack and won't be quite sure; it's usually safe to begin timing at
the first small cluster of pops, which will usually be within a few seconds
of that first. I have a kitchen timer that counts up - I start it when I
turn on the roaster, and can then note the 00:00 (min/sec) of first crack -
this makes it easier to figure out when to go to cool.
If you faithfully record 1st crack start, its end if you roast that long,
and the time you switch to cool as well as the appearance, smell, and other
obvious conditions of the beans when you take them out, after a while
you'll be able to see patterns that will guide you in subsequent roasts.
Although I have and sometimes use all sorts of brewers, must confess that I
mostly use a Braun electric drip. It does a predictable job, is easy to set
up and use, and anything else is too fussy in the morning. 
I also use a cheap coffee mill (not a whirly-blade) grinder. Cost me $14,
and I've gone through four of them in the past four years. Unfortunately,
you'd have to pay $30 or so to buy its cousin today - under the Melitta,
Capresso, or Gaggia cheapie label. Frankly, if you can afford more, I'd
suggest you buy something better. I will, when I figure out which to get.
I'm struggling now with my brand-new Alpenröst - which I'm finding is an
dramaticall different proposition from the FreshRoast or Hearthware. But
it's all coffee roasting in the end.
Kathleen

3) From: Tim Culver
Welcome, Mike.  
My current favorites for a light roast are Panama Lerida and Costa
Rica La Minita.  The Panama is completely bright and clean and
lovely.  The CR is more complex with some chocolately undertones.
I also have some CR "Conquistador" but I'm not sure I've figured it
out yet.  I also like every one of Tom's Mexican coffees I've tried.
Quite commonly I'll roast the same Mexican coffee once at a light
roast (1 minute after 1st crack ends) and once at a full city roast,
then blend the two roasts half-and-half.
I'll also recommend Yirgacheffe, although this seems to be a difficult
bean to roast.  I ordered one pound a while back, and on the fifth and
final batch I finally got the prized "floral" notes.  But the first
four roasts weren't very exciting.
Regarding "when is first crack?": Everybody means something different.
I would argue that the earliest "vanguard" and the latest "laggard"
snaps are outliers, and the best convention would be to pick some sort
of peak time in the middle.  That said, I usually wait until first
crack seems to be mostly over, then go for one more minute, and call
it a light roast.
For a dark roast, I wait for second crack, then stop slightly sooner.
:-)
-- 
Tim Culver
Chapel Hill, NC ... popper ... solis ... press pot

4) From: Mike Gastin
Hi Mike!
Nice name ...
Anyway, I agree with Tim below on gauging first and second crack. It is
pretty much how I define it.
also, my fav light roast is the Yirg, but Tim is again correct in saying it
is a tough one to nail down. But, if you get it right, there is nothing
quite like it! another fun coffee roaster just through first crack and left
to rest is the Harare. I have tasted, and some will agree ala Mark Prince
that it has a blueberry taste.
Happy roasting and welcome to the list.
Mike Gastin

5) From: coffenut
Hey Mike,
Just wanted to add my welcome.  I can't offer any tips on the HWP, but there
are many roasting veterans here in Tom's forum who can help.  Have fun and
welcome to the best coffee in the world...that which you make fresh at home.
Coffenut  :^)

6) From: Don Staricka
At 02:41 PM 8/11/00 -0700, you wrote:
<Snip>
I will presume that you are talking about the Melitta-style coffee funnel
and filter. This has been my preferred style for making coffee ever since I
graduated from stovetop percolators long ago in a galaxy far, far away.
I bring to a boil the precise amount of water that I plan to use for
brewing and then let the water cool to the point where it has just stopped
bubbling. In the mean time I grind to a fine powder the precise amount of
coffee that I will use and dump it into the filter which is in the filter
cone which is over the coffee receptacle. I pour the water directly over
the grounds slowly and continuously making sure that the grounds become
completely saturated. Let the water come up to the top of the filter and
continue pouring at a rate that keeps it there. With this method the less
time that the water is in contact with the coffee the better. Adjust the
amount of ground coffee to suit your taste.
<Snip>
This must be a typo or else you have an extremely hot (and defective) unit.
 First crack should not occur until after about 4 minutes or so. You would
measure time after the beginning of first crack. There will sometimes be a
bean that cracks way before the others so I always wait for a cluster to
start cracking and judge the time from there.  Same goes for second crack.
Use Tom's roasting suggestions as a guide. You will find them associated
with the description of the beans on the web site.  That will also give you
an idea which coffees take a lighter roast.
Don

7) From: Bearhair
Don Staricka  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
   Missed one step, which I always do. Run hot water through or fill the thermos
with hot water while grinding the beans and heating the brew water so that the
thermos is pre-heated before you brew. Ensures hot coffee on the second cup.
   I use an inexpensive Rival Hot Pot to heat my water and it's FAST!

8) From: Gary Zimmerman
 
<Snip>
I always run hot water through the paper filter to rinse it of any wetting 
agents or residue there might be.  Seems to cut down on the wet paper towel 
smell and taste that comes from the paper.  This is more of a problem with 
the brown (unbleached) paper filters, I believe.
-- garyZ
Whirly-drip(paper)-black
        & vacuum

9) From: Don Staricka
Both good points. I realized that I forgot an important point myself. The
biggest problem that I have had with paper filters over the years is having
the seams burst.  This was particularly a problem with Melitta brand
filters and cheap off-brands.  I could usually avoid this  problem by
folding the filter at the seams before inserting it into the cone. The
folded seams are much less likely to burst.
Melitta filters are no longer a problem for me because the latest version
seems to have this problem solved. I use the ones that are labelled "New
and Improved" and "Now with Flavor Pores". These filters really are a big
improvement over the old ones. The coffee seems to run through much faster.
I also can't detect any flavor contamination from the paper (and I use the
unbleached filters). I still fold them at the seams, however. In fact, I
just noticed while looking at the box that the instructions say to fold
them this way. I never noticed that before. It just seemed like an obvious
thing to do.
Don
At 07:50 PM 8/15/00 -0700, you wrote:
<Snip>
that the
<Snip>

10) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Newbie
Hello Everyone
I am brand new to this list so stay with me.  I have just been given about a kilo of coffee straight off a friend’s tree in his nature park here in Mauritius.  I have so far figured out that I need to peel the red outer layer to find the beans (clever yes?).  What do I do next.  I have a friend from the Caribbean and he talks of how his mother used to just roast the beans in a pan – so I would like to try this basic method if possible.  I like a very strong coffee and have a Magimix Espresso machine from which I always drink double espressos.  I am sure all this is very basic to you all – perhaps you could direct me to a quick rundown on what needs to be done.
Many thanks.
Wendy 
Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin 
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/fax/ans (230) 6257399 
Mobile (230) 2560182

11) From: Jack Stafford
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
Newbie
Wendy
 
I wish I could help you but, I'm new here. I'm sure some of 
these guys can and will.
From the tree to the cup, this is going to be fun to watch. 
Keep us posted on your progress. 
 
 How many pounds (oz?) is a kilo?
 
Jack

12) From: jim gundlach
Re: +Newbie
on 6/24/01 6:54 PM, Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin at auswin wrote:
Hello Everyone
I am brand new to this list so stay with me.  I have just been given about a kilo of coffee straight off a friend¹s tree in his nature park here in Mauritius.  I have so far figured out that I need to peel the red outer layer to find the beans (clever yes?).  What do I do next.  I have a friend from the Caribbean and he talks of how his mother used to just roast the beans in a pan ­ so I would like to try this basic method if possible.  I like a very strong coffee and have a Magimix Espresso machine from which I always drink double espressos.  I am sure all this is very basic to you all ­ perhaps you could direct me to a quick rundown on what needs to be done.
Many thanks.
Wendy,
   Here are a couple of ways to roast over wood, both work over gas fires also.
   http://www.sociology.auburn.edu/pecan/pecan.htmlOthers will probably note that most coffee processing involves a fermentation process to remove the pulp.">http://www.sociology.auburn.edu/woknwood/wok.html   http://www.sociology.auburn.edu/pecan/pecan.htmlOthers will probably note that most coffee processing involves a fermentation process to remove the pulp.
   Jim Gundlach
   Roasting over pecan wood fires
  in Shorter, AL
 

13) From: John Blumel
Wendy Austin wrote:
<Snip>
Wendy,
Take the cherries and lay them out on the ground -- preferably behind a 
shed -- in a single layer. Then, go back in the house and open the 
following URL in your web browser (it may take a couple of copy/paste 
operations to get both lines combined into the location field of your 
browser):http://www.sweetmarias.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?ScreenºSK&Store_Code=sm&Action­PR&Product_Code95&Attributes=Yes&Quantity=1 
Then, click on the 'checkout' image button at the top of the page and 
complete the forms that appear. In a couple of weeks (I'm not really sure 
of this time), a package will be delivered to your house. Now go back out 
behind the shed and check on the coffee cherries -- most of them should 
have been removed by the local wildlife, the rest you can ignore. 
You should now have about 1 lb of excellent coffee. Your friend will be 
impressed.
John Blumel
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Re: +Newbie
On 25/06/01 17:19, "Jack Stafford" <jstafford> wrote:
Wendy
 
 How many pounds (oz?) is a kilo?
 
Jack
Thanks Jack – I think one kilo is about two pounds.
Wendy
 
Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin 
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/fax/ans (230) 6257399 
Mobile (230) 2560182

15) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Re: +Newbie
On 25/06/01 22:22, "jim gundlach" <drg> wrote:
Wendy,
  Here are a couple of ways to roast over wood, both work over gas fires also.
  http://www.sociology.auburn.edu/pecan/pecan.htmlHi Jim">http://www.sociology.auburn.edu/woknwood/wok.html  http://www.sociology.auburn.edu/pecan/pecan.htmlHi Jim
Enjoyed these sites.  I am starting to get a picture of what needs to be done.  
Kind regards
Wendy
"DOS Computers made by companies such as IBM, Compaq...and millions
of others are by far the most popular... Macintosh fans, on the other
hand, may note that cockroaches are far more numerous than humans,
and numbers alone do not denote a higher life form."
-The New York Times
 

16) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
On 25/06/01 23:12, "John Blumel"  wrote:
<Snip>
Ahh John
That's no fun!!  Order in green beans .... Mmmmmm,  I wonder what our local
customs official would make of that.
Kind regards
Wendy
Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/fax/ans (230) 6257399
Mobile (230) 2560182
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

17) From: Glenn R. Holmes
2.2 lbs = 1 kg (rounded)
Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

18) From: John Blumel
On 6/26/01 2:06 AM, Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin wrote:
<Snip>
Well, in that case...
Take the cherries and lay them out on a table in the sun -- preferably 
where the local wildlife can't get them -- in a single layer. Then go 
back in the house and open the following URL in your web browser:
 http://www.google.comStart searching for 'coffee dry process'...
Seriously though, based on the relative silence on the list in response 
to your question, I must conclude that we are ignorant as to how you 
should proceed. Let us know how it turns out.
John Blumel
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

19) From: Dave Huddle
Wendy,
A friend in the Kona region of Hawaii told me he puts the cherries in a
bucket of water and stomps/washes them till all the pulp is removed,
then lays the beans out to dry.
When they are dry, he puts them in a burlap bag, and beats the bag of
beans with a baseball bat to remove the parchment.
THEN, they are ready for roasting.
I'll continue to get my beans from Tom!
Dave	Westerville, OH		just 25 minutes from SweetMaria's
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

20) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
From: John Blumel 
Subject: Re: +Newbie
Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2001 08:09:00 -0500
I thought "how many pounds in a kilo" was a joke, and your previous
posting was a joke...
<Snip>
I also think not many people have actually put their hands on the
process... I never did...
<Snip>
I think two major variants of dry processes are used in large farms on
flat land like Brazil or tiny farms in Sumatra. However, for 1 kg, wet
process might not be a bad idea as it produces more consistent result
without subjecting the coffee to wild animals and varying weather.
Pulp must be removed somehow. If a pulper was accessible, there
wouldn't be the original question, so this should be done in some
other way (a knife and your hands? a garlic press with bigger holes? 
maybe potato musher?). Then, the rubbery gelatine layer must be washed
off (scrubbing sponges? or mix with clean sands or pumice and
knead-polish beans?). They usually ferment that layer and wash
off. After drying, perchment and some silver skin is removed by
something like threshing machine (sand paper or pumice again?).
I guess it can be possible to do these with manually a knife and
scrubbing-sponges etc but I never tried.
I'll try these methods when SM start carrying cherries. I hope no one
owns a patent on potato musher.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

21) From: Bearhair
John Blumel  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
   Cee Smith, of Smith Farms in Kona, Hawaii, hangs out in alt.coffee.
You might want to try asking there.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

22) From: Dave Clark
Bearhair wrote:
<Snip>
Or maybe find themselves a civet cat... ;o)
-- 
Dave Clark                                             Austin, Texashttp://www.jump.net/~davec                            N 30d 27.526m
mailto:davec                                  W 97d 48.826m
Nothing increases the size of a fish like fishing all by yourself.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

23) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Thanks Dave and John, sounds like good therapy after a 'hard day at the
office'.
I am now going to shell them by hand, hope the sun comes out tomorrow and
get back to you all in a few days time to let you know how they are going.
Wendy
On 26/06/01 23:37, "Dave Huddle"  wrote:
<Snip>
Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/fax/ans (230) 6257399
Mobile (230) 2560182
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

24) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
On 27/06/01 13:29, "Andrew Thomas"  wrote:
<Snip>
etc
Thanks for the information Andrew - here is what I have done so far.  Last
night I Œshelled¹ the beans by hand so I now have lovely stained fingers.
Today I washed them to get the Œsticky stuff¹ off and I am now running
outside with them every time the sun shines!  It is winter here and we have
an anti-cyclone howling with passing rain.
I will try to find out what sort of coffee tree these beans are from.  There
is a commercial production of coffee done here - very small scale as once
the sugar cane and tea plantations are in there is little room for coffee!
It is used on the local airline, Air Mauritius and available in the
supermarkets in beans or ground.   I have tried their beans but found them
much too mild for my taste.
I live right on the beach and the tree that bore the fruit I have is not far
away however I believe the commercial production is up in the mountains.
You have now set me on a mission and I will endeavour to find out more about
them.
The sun is still shining .....
Wendy
Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/fax/ans (230) 6257399
Mobile (230) 2560182
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

25) From: Dennis Parham
--Apple-Mail-3-24936671
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	format=flowed
hey everyone! My name is Dennis and Im new here... I have been roasting =
with the poppery II for a few months now and it is my only experience 
with roasting... im really lovin it with my Pasquini Livia 90... my 
question is... if I goto an i-Roast or something like that.. will I 
most likely always get a better roast?? As most of us here are... Im 
pretty finicky about my coffee roast but havent really had to waste any =
yet (accept first batch as I went to ash with the Monkey blend, which I =
love now about few snaps into 2nd crack 6.2mins w/ 30sec break at first =
snap)  Anyway, after my little tangent ;)) hehe  Im having trouble 
justifying the 200 bucks  if the i-Roast if it will not produce better =
coffee... but it sure looks NICE!!!  ( I just want the best taste I can =
get and if that means an i-Roast (since it is small.. then I might have =
to do that!)
REGARDS!
Dennis
On Aug 10, 2004, at 9:23 AM, Oaklandguy wrote:
<Snip>
are 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
to 
<Snip>
Some 
<Snip>
<Snip>
homeroasting.
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-3-24936671
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charsetO-8859-1
hey everyone! My name is Dennis and Im new here... I have been
roasting with the poppery II for a few months now and it is my only
experience with roasting... im really lovin it with my Pasquini Livia
90... my question is... if I goto an i-Roast or something like that..
will I most likely always get a better roast?? As most of us here
are... Im pretty finicky about my coffee roast but havent really had
to waste any yet (accept first batch as I went to ash with the Monkey
blend, which I love now about few snaps into 2nd crack 6.2mins w/
30sec break at first snap)  Anyway, after my little tangent ;)) hehe 
Im having trouble justifying the 200 bucks  if the i-Roast if it will
not produce better coffee... but it sure looks NICE!!!  ( I just want
the best taste I can get and if that means an i-Roast (since it is
small.. then I might have to do that!)
REGARDS!
Dennis
On Aug 10, 2004, at 9:23 AM, Oaklandguy wrote:
Comic Sans MSWelcome to
homeroasting, John.  It can be an adventure, and there are lots of
folks on this list willing to share their knowledge and =
experience.
 
Comic Sans MSTom sure has described my
roasting experience!  The first ever batch of beans was the best cup
of coffee I think I ever had.
 
Comic Sans MSA week-and-a-half into
homeroasting, the coffee's been good - but not like that first batch. 
However, I keep plugging away.  Not trying to recreate the same
experience, but others that are just as good.  Some folks do well
with  timing and checking temperatures, others do well with bean color
and aroma during the roast.
 
Comic Sans MSPatience and try, try again
seem to be the watchwords for homeroasting.
 
Comic Sans MSBrent

26) From: Ben Treichel
Hey Dennis &  John R,
You can buy an I-roast from what I've seen (done back to back 
comparisons) it probably the 2nd best commercial roaster out there. The 
hottop is number 1, but $$$'s. For less that 200 you can hack your PII, 
and get a better roaster. However, that path is not for everyone.
A primer on that path can be found at http://www.homeroaster.com/geekmod.htmlJR,
If you read the cupping notes on the SM site you will find a lot of the 
information you seek. Also roast speed affects cup quality, and coffee 
and origins differ greatly so you need to know what you like.
FYI, as your coffee improves what you thought was great will now taste 
like trash, so hang in there for a while.
Ben
Dennis Parham wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

27) From: Dennis Parham
hehehe.... yea... BEN I think that is what is happening at first it was 
not too good then it was ALLOT better and now it is not as good... it 
SMELLS great but it seems it takes too little time to roast... 6.2 on 
the monkey blend with the 30 sec break(unplug) at about 2.5-3 min .. 
sign of first crack.... Im looking at roast profiles showing up to 15 
min!  hmm... maybe I will manually try that as I have the veggie can 
and thermometer...
THANKS!
Dennis
On Aug 10, 2004, at 10:05 AM, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>

28) From: gin
Dennis Welcome to this great place. We have lots of fun along with great 
coffee stuff.
ginny
At 07:39 AM 8/10/2004, you wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Dennis Parham
Thanks Ginny, I pretty happy to find everyone here!! it is MUCH nicer  
when the people I chat with actually use the same beans I do! lol  
.....so we are all kind of on same page with each other!!!  hehehe
THANK!!
Dennis Parhamhttp://www.parhamguitars.comOn Aug 10, 2004, at 10:34 AM, gin wrote:
<Snip>

30) From: Paul
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Everyone. I am fairly new to home roasting and am enjoying learning
immensely. I look forward to picking up tips on getting that perfect roast
fromt he veterans out there.
 
Paul

31) From: Ben Treichel
Paul wrote:
<Snip>
welcome

32) From: Edward Spiegel
At 11:05 AM -0400 8/10/04, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>
I want to mention that one can get amazing roasts with a popcorn popper even without doing any mods. Using various techniques like tilting, stirring, stalling, making sure that you have an optimal amount of beans for the desired roast level, and using an extension cord at times that you can greatly influence the roast profile in ways that will allow you to achieve great roasts.
Modding the popper may simplify the task of maximizing the potential, but you can also get results that will rival any roast method by applying the various 'manual' techniques available I mentioned in short above.
Just my .02,
Edward

33) From: Dennis Parham
HAHA  KEWL!!  I thought there was more too it...LOL  I had been kinda 
agitating my beans until first crack frequently to get it to come up to 
heat more evenly.. and to allow the chaff to blow free... hmm... maybe 
there is hope to my madness!! hehee
Dennis
On Aug 10, 2004, at 11:24 AM, Edward Spiegel wrote:
<Snip>

34) From: gin
Same page Dennis, never but we pretend sometimes to allow ourselves to "get 
along".
gin
At 08:37 AM 8/10/2004, you wrote:
<Snip>

35) From: gin
Hi Paul,
Welcome to the "collection of crazies".
You will have lots of fun and get great info around here regardless of your 
need.
ginny
At 08:49 AM 8/10/2004, you wrote:
<Snip>

36) From: Lesley Albjerg
Dennis,
I don't own an I Roast.  I doubt I ever will.  I have found a well tuned popper to do an excellent roast.  My experience with commercial fluid bed roasters is they don't last!
Actually Heat Gun - Dog Bowl Roasting works well too!
 
Les
Dennis Parham  wrote:
hey everyone! My name is Dennis and Im new here... I have been roasting 
with the poppery II for a few months now and it is my only experience 
with roasting... im really lovin it with my Pasquini Livia 90... my 
question is... if I goto an i-Roast or something like that.. will I 
most likely always get a better roast?? As most of us here are... Im 
pretty finicky about my coffee roast but havent really had to waste any 
yet (accept first batch as I went to ash with the Monkey blend, which I 
love now about few snaps into 2nd crack 6.2mins w/ 30sec break at first 
snap) Anyway, after my little tangent ;)) hehe Im having trouble 
justifying the 200 bucks if the i-Roast if it will not produce better 
coffee... but it sure looks NICE!!! ( I just want the best taste I can 
get and if that means an i-Roast (since it is small.. then I might have 
to do that!)
REGARDS!
Dennis
On Aug 10, 2004, at 9:23 AM, Oaklandguy wrote:
<Snip>

37) From: miKe mcKoffee
Welcome Paul and enjoy the journey. BTW, that singular "perfect" roast
doesn't exist but we keep trying:-) Not to mention what may seem the perfect
roast for a given bean to one person is too light or too dark or roasted too
fast or roasted too slow or roasted wrong temp rise rates or or or etc etc
etc for another!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

38) From: Lilboybrew
Hi, there. I've been lurking the list for a week or so, trying to get my
bearings with the group, and I figured it was time to chime in, before I
start feeling like a stalker. 
 
I live in Athens, GA; born here in '51 (I haven't been here the whole time -
I lived in Atlanta a couple of years and Boston for 3); wife, son, daughter,
dog, cat (1 each). Career in manufacturing automation, mainly making large
electric motors go round and round. These days I'm an instructor for the GA
Dep't of Adult and Technical Education, teaching other people how to do what
I used to do.
 
I started home roasting a couple of years ago with a Whirly-Pop. Realized
that wasn't going to cut it, so I bought a Fresh Roast 8, which I broke by
not waiting long enough between successive roasts. In the interest of
avoiding a long, boring story, I won't go into why I laid off roasting for
the past year, but I just got a new iRoast2 and am back at it. I also have a
Solis Maestro grinder. I brew with either a Bodum Press (8 Tasse and 2
Tasse) or Bialetti Moka pot (I have the smallest size and the next size up,
sorta like the Bodums).
 
The other beverage I like to play with is beer; I homebrew, participate in
tastings, judge competitions, and write the "Styles" column for the Southern
Brew News.  The best of both worlds?  Terrapin's "Wake 'n' Bake Stout",
brewed with a special blend from Jittery Joe's Coffee Roasters  -  yum!
 
Anywho, that's a little bit about me. I'm looking forward to getting to know
you all and benefiting from the depth of knowledge and experience that this
group so obviously has. I'm really glad to find such a friendly forum in
which to learn this new craft (hobby? passion? obsession?) that threatens to
consume my every disposable buck.
 
Thanks,
 
Larry Johnson (Lilboybrew)
 
p.s. If anyone wants to email me directly (to take an off-topic discussion
offline, for example) my email is lilboybrew Just take
the word "remove" out of the address.
 
To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler--and less
trouble.   -  Mark Twain

39) From: Brett Mason
Welcome Larry - glad you're here!
Brett
On 12/30/06, Lilboybrew  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

40) From: Eddie Dove
That explains why I've been looking over my shoulder all week ... ;-)
Welcome aboard Larry!
Eddie
On 12/30/06, Lilboybrew  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/

41) From: Michael Dhabolt
Larry,
Welcome aboard.
Sounds like you have a skill/experience set that, in time, will prove useful
to listmembers.  We all have the habit of picking each others brains, on a
pretty regular basis.
Mike (just plain)

42) From: jim gundlach
Larry,
    Welcome to the list.  Good to see another southerner. I'm down  
I-85 just past Auburn, Alabama.  Also, your skills may be useful,  
there are often electric motor questions on the list.
     Pecan Jim
On Dec 30, 2006, at 6:21 PM, Lilboybrew wrote:
<Snip>

43) From: miKe mcKoffee
Welcome to the List. I'd ask how you went a year without home roast but
maybe you have good micro roaster locally.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

44) From: RK
<Snip>
I will add my welcome also Larry, keep posting,
RK just North a bit from Athens, I live in Anderson SC

45) From: john nanavati
welcome to the list.
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

46) From: Les
Welcome to the hobby (obsession).
Les
On 12/30/06, Lilboybrew  wrote:
<Snip>

47) From: raymanowen
"...a Fresh Roast 8, which I broke by not waiting long enough between
successive roasts."
And I thought I was thrashing mine about as hard as I could to roast nearly
a pound in 5 successive roasts. All I did was to run the Cool cycle twice
between roasts: Roast, Cool, Cool, Roast, Cool, Cool, Roast... 4 went in th=
e
jar, #5 went in the pot- Bunn, Bodum press, Aluminumoka, Vietnamese filter,
via Maestro Plus
I'm thinking, "Welcome" and I think you blew the thermal fuse.
I fix bad Fth's by recalibrating blue ones with a 20 Ga Cu link.
The new current is 3A, and the new temperature is just over 1800° F. It
proves- "A watched fuse never blows," and I just need to reconfirm.
What a neat setup you have, Larry. Obviously, you're all about Flavor.
If I brewed something that matched a San Miguel Super Bock, the magic would
be gone and I'd have to find a new reason to go back, like the Mariposa gol=
f
course at Clark with my son.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

48) From: Lilboybrew
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Early, early on New Year’s Eve, RayO wrote:
 
“All I did was to run the Cool cycle twice between roasts: Roast, =
Cool,
Cool, Roast, Cool, Cool, Roast... 4 went in the jar, #5 went in the pot-
Bunn, Bodum press, Aluminumoka, Vietnamese filter, via Maestro Plus” 
and:
I'm thinking, "Welcome" and I think you blew the thermal fuse.
I fix bad Fth's by recalibrating blue ones with a 20 Ga Cu link.
The new current is 3A, and the new temperature is just over 1800° F. 
 
It proves- "A watched fuse never blows," and I just need to reconfirm. 
Thanks for the welcome and the technical advice. I’ll look into that =
thermal
fuse idea (I like it!).
 
and then:
 
What a neat setup you have, Larry. Obviously, you're all about Flavor. 
Thanks, but you’re too kind, I’m sure. The posters on this list have
grinders that cost more than my first car. I have no espresso maker (I =
guess
I never will – according to what I’ve read here, I need to pony up =
$1200 or
more just to get started.)  But, yeah, I am into flavorful coffee (and =
beer,
for that matter).
 
and finally:
 
If I brewed something that matched a San Miguel Super Bock, the magic =
would
be gone and I'd have to find a new reason to go back, like the Mariposa =
golf
course at Clark with my son.
 
Never had it but it sounds good. Anything in the Bock family is worth a =
try
from me.
 
Thanks again for the advice.
 
Larry J (Lilboybrew)
 
 
To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler--and =
less
trouble.
 
-  Mark Twain
 

49) From: Eddie Dove
Larry,
Great handle ...
You wrote:  "I guess I never will – according to what I've read here, I n=
eed
to pony up $1200 or more just to get started."
Naaa.  Rancilio Rocky for under $300, Gaggia for about $200 and you;ll have
to deal with Les on the Thor Tamper.  (This assumes all new stuff)  With
that you can make excellent espresso!
Happy New Year!
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 12/31/06, Lilboybrew  wrote:
<Snip>
ess
<Snip>
0 or
<Snip>
er,
<Snip>

50) From: Julie Moore
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
O.K. the popper is cranked up and the semi-roasted beans are in.  I =
still
don't hear any crack and it's been 10 minutes at this point and no =
burning
either.  Maybe my popper doesn't get hot enough for some reason.  I =
checked
it with my kiln pyrometer and I'm getting a reading of 370 degrees.  Is =
that
reasonable?
 
Julie
King  George, VA

51) From: stereoplegic
370 is definately not going to get you to first crack. what kind of 
popper are you using? this should be a pretty easy fix, there are plenty 
of sources for modifications on the web and, believe me, these mods 
aren't nearly as scary as they may seem at first.
juliemoore wrote:
<Snip>

52) From: Brett Mason
Hi Julie,
You need more beans, which will slow down the air blowing by, and retain
more heat.  Which popper are you using?  I usually us a 1/2c dry measure of
beans.  More will get hotter.  Too many more and the beans won't agitate
enough until they dry out - you'd need to stir them until they dry enough to
move around...
Which popper - if I have the same popper in my collection, I can help yu
gauge the quantity of beans...
Brett
On 1/10/07, Julie Moore  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

53) From: Julie Moore
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I'm using a Wear-Ever Popcorn Pumper, 1250 W.
 
I just tossed the batch in a cast iron frying pan and was able to get =
them
to first crack.  Yahoo, I heard it.  they started smelling more like =
coffee
and taste pretty good when I suck on them also.  Now, I just have to air =
out
the house before bed.
 
Julie
King George, VA

54) From: Brett Mason
Try using more beans - go with 4oz or maybe 5 oz in the pumper - and do it
outside...
On 1/10/07, Julie Moore  wrote:
<Snip>
m
<Snip>
ffee
<Snip>
out
<Snip>
of
<Snip>
 to
<Snip>
g
<Snip>
ed
<Snip>
hat
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

55) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
If it won't go above 370, that probably means the thermostat is cutting 
out the heater.
Most people using popcorn poppers to roast coffee would short-circuit 
that thermostat in various ways.
Dave S.
Julie Moore wrote:
<Snip>

56) From: Brett Mason
Need
  More
    Beans
On 1/10/07, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

57) From: SamToren
Now you see why I got a Poppery - they work much better (it needs to get to 450F). I gave up after 15 minutes on my Pumper.
   
    Forwarded Message 
        From:  "Julie Moore"     To:  homeroast    Subject:  RE: +Newbie    Date:  Wed, 10 Jan 2007 23:00:17 -0500    HTML Attachment [ Scan and Save to Computer | Save to Yahoo! Briefcase ] 
                I’m using a Wear-Ever Popcorn Pumper, 1250 W.
   
  I just tossed the batch in a cast iron frying pan and was able to get them to first crack.  Yahoo, I heard it…  they started smelling more like coffee and taste pretty good when I suck on them also.  Now, I just have to air out the house before bed.
   
  Julie
  King George, VA

58) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
How
 Do
  You
    Know?
Perhaps he is already full of beans.
Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>

59) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Not
  Necessarily
    Could
       Indeed
          Be
              Thermostat
                  Limiter
                     Kicking
                        In
                           Been
                                Seen
                                     To
                                         Happen
                                              By
                                                  Many
                                                       People
                                                            Many
                                                                 Poppers
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 8:33 PM
Need
  More
    Beans
On 1/10/07, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote: 
If it won't go above 370, that probably means the thermostat is cutting
out the heater.
Most people using popcorn poppers to roast coffee would short-circuit
that thermostat in various ways.
Dave S.

60) From: Brett Mason
Not enough beans is the simplest explanation, and occurs often with new
roasters using poppers.
It's perhaps the simplest to test (run 1 load with more beans).
It occured when I first used my first popper - a yellow and white pumper.  I
didn't want to botch the first roast so I went with only a few.
But you're right - this could be global warming - or maybe a political
conspiracy.
B.
On 1/10/07, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

61) From: Michael Dhabolt
Too
 Light
  of
   a
    bean
     load
      is
       also
        common
         problem
          for
           beginner
            popper
             roasters.
                Mike
                 (just plain)

62) From: miKe mcKoffee
                                         Absolutely
                                        too
                                       few                       
                                      beans
                                     in
                                    many
                                   poppers
                                  can
                                 result
                                in
                               roast
                              stalling
                             which
                            is
                           why
                          I
                         hate
                        suggestions
                       of
                      specific
                     weight
                    or
                   volume
                  of 
                 beans
                but
               rather
              feel
             it's
            better
           advice
          to
         suggest
        adding
       greens
      until
     the
    beans
   almost
  stop
 moving.
  Slight
   rocking
    or
     stirring
      may
       be 
        needed
         until
          the
           beans
            lighten
             from
              drying
               and
                pick
                 up
                  greater
                   movement.
                  But
                 if
                this
               method
              stalls
             need
            to 
           check
          further
         like
        voltage
       or
      thermal
     limiter
    or 
   ambient
  temp...
miKe

63) From: raymanowen
I had no trouble with the WEPP- gave it to a friend so he could try
roasting. I think Carlos likes his tea. Well, so do I- antioxidant and all.
Nothing compares with freshroast.
Wow! If you "just have to air out the house before bed," you will be
exchanging sub-freezing air for wonderful coffee aroma. I would be shivering
at a 6.0 on the Richter scale!
Ch-Ch-Cheers -RayO, a-k-k-a Opapapa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

64) From: Brett Mason
You just out-did Microsoft's WordART - Kudos!
On 1/10/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

65) From: Gary Townsend
On 1/10/07, SamToren  wrote:
<Snip>
Sam,
I can fix up that Popcorn Pumper to roast around 6 oz of coffee with.
Without additional electronics ;-)
Gary   garybt3 Roasting Coffee @ Home 
Scroll to the bottom of the page and go to the link: How to Modify a Popcorn
Pumper

66) From: SamToren
Thats a very cool modification!!!
   
  I wquld have liked to try that, though I got rid of my pumper when I roasted my first batch in the poppery 2. I am now up to around 8 poppery 2s, and 3 original popperys. With the electrical wiring modification of the original poppery (so the on/off switch will do cooling), as well as the addition of a thermometer in the butter dish, the original poppery works better than anything else I have tried for under $500 (especially since they cost $3 to $5).
   
  Gary, it looks like you beat me on the number of popcorn poppers you have sitting on a shelf. Well done!!!
   
    Forwarded Message 
          Date:  Thu, 11 Jan 2007 08:25:42 -0600    From:  "Gary Townsend"     To:  homeroast    Subject:  Re: +Newbie
    HTML Attachment [ Scan and Save to Computer | Save to Yahoo! Briefcase ] 
  On 1/10/07, SamToren  wrote:       Now you see why I got a Poppery - they work much better (it needs to get to 450F). I gave up after 15 minutes on my Pumper.
  
Sam, 
I can fix up that Popcorn Pumper to roast around 6 oz of coffee with. 
Without additional electronics ;-)
Gary   garybt3 Roasting Coffee @ Home
Scroll to the bottom of the page and go to the link: How to Modify a Popcorn Pumper 

67) From: Brian Kamnetz
I did a quick google search and came up with the following instructions for
slightly modifying the Popcorn Pumper:http://www.homeroasters.org/php/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id2&thread_id#0Brian
On 1/11/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

68) From: Larry Williams
Here I am trying to sell one Poppery and you have 8 of them AND they 
only cost you $3 to $5.  Sounds like mine is destined for the garage 
sale pile.
Larry
SamToren wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.410 / Virus Database: 268.16.9/623 - Release Date: 1/11/2007

69) From:
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
        We are the semi-enthusiastic new owners (maybe thirty roasts so =
far) of a Fresh Roast, and have tried to follow both the manufacturer's =
instructions and Tom's personal  hints.  The results have been great =
(with half a dozen different bean sources) for ouor breakfast   =
cafe-au-lait (like some French coffee snob friends, we prefer fat-free). =
 
        But for stand-alone black coffee, Fresh Roast and I haven't got =
it right yet.  Even a very strong cup with great aroma has a hint of =
dishwater, and there is a slight acridity even from highest quality =
beans.  Slightly increasing the size of the roast or preheating the =
roaster, thus raising the temperature, doesn't help.
         For most varieties, I have come to prefer the low end of the =
recommended ranges (6, not 6 and a half or seven), but nothing has been =
perfect.  I finally noticed that first crack begins earlier than =
advertised, at about 4.  
        Does this sound as though my ignorance is the negative factor, =
or is it possible that the heat control on my roaster is abnormal and =
could be adjusted for?
        Blunt advice solicited.  TIA

70) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_78014031==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
I will be honest and let you know that since I have a different 
machine I can't help on that end of things.  But, to be newbies and 
have 30+ roasts is great, I think.  I have only 21 after just over 5 
weeks.  Since I am the only one who drinks it in this house, I am 
gifting it so I can get differing opinions from people who know good coffee.
Then, for two folks, I started roasting a particular type, which they 
pay me full coffee roaster price for.  I would give it away free, but 
they insist, bringing up the cost of the machine running (time on 
it), the bags, the coffee, and my time.  I don't get everyone of 
their roasts perfect, though I have pretty much dialed in on theirs, 
but they don't complain.  They tell me the truth is a way that may 
help me, but they still feel that the worst I have given them has 
been better than any can.  And to be more than fair, they pay for 
what a pound would cost when I only get them 11 ounces or 313 
grams.  They told me they get a kick out of how much fun I have 
explaining what Tom has written, explaining what I did correctly or 
incorrectly.
I am sure someone will be along shortly with an answer to your 
question.  At the very least, it certainly sounds like you both are 
having fun and enjoying the coffee to its fullest.  Congratulations.
At 09:09 AM 8/27/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_78014031==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
I will be honest and let you know that since I have a
different machine I can't help on that end of things.  But, to be
newbies and have 30+ roasts is great, I think.  I have only 21 after
just over 5 weeks.  Since I am the only one who drinks it in this
house, I am gifting it so I can get differing opinions from people who
know good coffee.  
Then, for two folks, I started roasting a particular type, which they pay
me full coffee roaster price for.  I would give it away free, but
they insist, bringing up the cost of the machine running (time on it),
the bags, the coffee, and my time.  I don't get everyone of their
roasts perfect, though I have pretty much dialed in on theirs, but they
don't complain.  They tell me the truth is a way that may help me,
but they still feel that the worst I have given them has been better than
any can.  And to be more than fair, they pay for what a pound would
cost when I only get them 11 ounces or 313 grams.  They told me they
get a kick out of how much fun I have explaining what Tom has written,
explaining what I did correctly or incorrectly.
I am sure someone will be along shortly with an answer to your
question.  At the very least, it certainly sounds like you both are
having fun and enjoying the coffee to its fullest. 
Congratulations.
At 09:09 AM 8/27/2007, you wrote:
        We are the semi-enthusiastic
new owners (maybe thirty roasts so far) of a Fresh Roast, and have tried
to follow both the manufacturer's instructions and Tom's personal 
hints.  The results have been great (with half a dozen different
bean sources) for ouor breakfast   cafe-au-lait (like
some French coffee snob friends, we prefer fat-free).  
        But for stand-alone black
coffee, Fresh Roast and I haven't got it right yet.  Even a very
strong cup with great aroma has a hint of dishwater, and there is a
slight acridity even from highest quality beans.  Slightly
increasing the size of the roast or preheating the roaster, thus raising
the temperature, doesn't help.
         For most varieties, I
have come to prefer the low end of the recommended ranges (6, not 6 and a
half or seven), but nothing has been perfect.  I finally noticed
that first crack begins earlier than advertised, at about 4.  
        Does this sound as though my
ignorance is the negative factor, or is it possible that the heat control
on my roaster is abnormal and could be adjusted for?
        Blunt advice solicited. 
TIA
--=====================_78014031==.ALT--

71) From: David Martin
One thing you might try, if you haven't already, is to reduce the
number of beans per roast. Overloading the FR can make it roast
faster, as the extra volume of beans reduces air flow, thus making
them heat up more quickly.
-Dave
On 8/27/07, johnmhowison  wrote:
<Snip>

72) From: raymanowen
The FreshRoast roaster was the first and only machine I have acquired
that would deliver roasted coffee for the mere expedient of loading
green, plugging it in and turning it on.
No such thing as, "Set it and Forget it," as in Ronco Popiel's
appliances, but I knew that, and abhor the idea anyway. If you like
the way it operates and can merge with it, it's automatic.
Everything about coffee gives a different, distinct response to
varying inputs to the way it's stored, roasted, aged, ground, brewed
and even tasted. Cuppers have to standardize or they'd have no basis
for communication of comparisons and contrasts of the different
origins.
If it were easy, any dang fool could succeed and it wouldn't be so special.
You're Here, and that puts you in a special class. It takes a
Different  Village to raise a coffee aficionado. You really don't do
anything rong with coffee. Just take notes so you can repeat your
favorite misteaks.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
On 8/27/07, johnmhowison  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

73) From: raymanowen
The FreshRoast roaster was the first and only machine I have acquired
that would deliver roasted coffee for the mere expedient of loading
green, plug it in and turn it on.
No such thing as, "Set it and Forget it," as in Ronco Popiel's
appliances. I knew that, and abhor the idea anyway. The machine will
teach you as you take notes.
What is the appearance of the roasted coffee? You don't say anything
about Shiny Black, so you haven't gone too far. Starbucks is too far,
but maybe not if it's ultra fresh. "I just brewed it" is not an answer
to "How fresh is the roast?" Keep on truckin'-
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
On 8/27/07, johnmhowison  wrote:
<Snip>

74) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ditto on the advice to experiment with varying the amount of beans.  =
Otherwise, having used a couple of small air roasters for several years, =
I discovered a completely different world of roast tastes after moving =
to a drum roaster. 
You may have a problem with the roaster, but perhaps you are just not =
satisfied with the characteristic roast from that type machine.  I =
suggest you order one of Tom's roasted coffees and a small quantity of =
the same bean, then compare your roasts to Tom's.  You'll never match =
the roast from a large drum roaster, but it will give you some idea how =
your roaster stacks up after some experimentation.
Or, for a small investment, you could try HGDB.  It's a really great way =
to get familiar with how coffee looks, smells and sounds through the =
roast process.  You'll learn more in a shorter time than with any other =
roast process, IMHO.  
Michael Wade

75) From: golfermd01
I am fairly new to the home roasting world. I have to say that I am thoroughly loving it. I first used an air popper with pretty good results. I know the popper wasn't designed to be used like this so I purchased the Fresh Roast. I eventually want to buy the Gene or better. But that is a way off. The biggest challenge has been learning the coffee roasts (like that is a surpirse to anyone!!). I have been able to get some pretty good results, but also some that haven't quite worked out optimally (read as pretty bad). I have to say that when the roast is right the tastes are out of t his world. I can never go back to big green. Being partially color blind isn't making the t ask of roasting any easier. But I will manage to get by. I have read a good number of the posts so far and am a sponge for the knowledge of others. Keep posting!!
Dan
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

76) From: Les
Welcome Dan!  Enjoy the journey,
Les
On Wed, Jul 16, 2008 at 9:45 AM,  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

77) From: Eddie Dove
Welcome aboard, Dan!
Don't worry about being color blind.  Many of us use roasters in which
we can't see the beans during the roast, like my RK Drum.  Time,
sound, smoke and smell are excellent indicators ...
Let us know how the roasting is going.
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Referencehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Wed, Jul 16, 2008 at 11:45 AM,   wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

78) From: raymanowen
Wait a minute- " I can never go back to big green. Being partially color
blind isn't making the t ask _any easier."  If I think about that some
more... -ro
On Wed, Jul 16, 2008 at 10:45 AM,  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20


HomeRoast Digest