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Topic: Alpenrost problem (14 msgs / 382 lines)
1) From: Carolyn Cook
Hi, I'm Caroline,
I work with a Papuan Highland group developing coffee in a sustainable agriculture system (West Papua, Indonesia). We haven't started up our large roaster yet and I've been using my little Alpenrost for test batches. Last week it just quit. No electricity was entering the machine. I saw a note from someone else on the question and answer thing where the same had happened to her. I took mine to an electrician and he told me that a fuse had melted. We replaced it and it worked fine for 1/2 of a roast. Then, it burned out again. Now I'm wondering what is leading to the destruction of this fuse? I plug the roaster into a voltage regulator, so it's hard to believe that it could be a problem with current. Any ideas? Can you give me instructions how to get back to that question answer format?
Thanks,
Caroline
 
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2) From: John Abbott
Caroline,
    It could be something binding the free rotation of the motor - which in
turn would cause the motor to draw excessive current, which would blow the
fuse (its intended purpose).  I would check to make sure that as the heat
expands the moving parts that nothing is binding. Just a guess at this
point.
John - joyfully retired in FREEZING SOUTHERN TEXAS!!

3) From: Michael Vanecek
I had the same thing happen to me too - but I just sent it back to 
Swissmar and they sent me a new one. Guess that's not quite so 
convenient there, is it? If something is melting the fuse, that means 
that there's a draw inside the machine that's overwhelming the fuse - I 
wouldn't suspect the power source unless other appliances are also 
having problems. I'd give Swissmar a call anyway - their tech support is 
top notch and they're *much* more familiar with the inner workings of 
that beast than I am. And I'm sure, once they know you're a coffee 
producer, perhaps they'd be a little extra respectfull - considering 
it's good coffee like yours that drives their business. :)
Good luck,
Mike
Carolyn Cook wrote:
<Snip>
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4) From: Carolyn Cook
John,
Thanks for your response. This does make sense. I'll have the electrician check that possibility. I wish I could send you some of our nice weather (and our wonderful coffee). It rains here a lot, but the temperature is always in the 70s and 80s during the day. 
Caroline
 John Abbott  wrote:Caroline,
It could be something binding the free rotation of the motor - which in
turn would cause the motor to draw excessive current, which would blow the
fuse (its intended purpose). I would check to make sure that as the heat
expands the moving parts that nothing is binding. Just a guess at this
point.
John - joyfully retired in FREEZING SOUTHERN TEXAS!!

5) From: John Abbott
Our normal temperatures at in the high 70's this time of the year.  We are
getting the benefit of a artic air blast that has the rest of the country in
a snow bank.  We are going to be down to 55 or so on Thanksgiving day - we
should be warm again by Saturday.  We are only 1500 yards from Mexico and
live in the tip of Texas - we are south of the tip of Florida - so we
generally have HOT weather.  I've had a couple of different friends who have
lived in PNG and they loved it... must be a nice place - sure produces some
great coffee.
John

6) From: Ben Treichel
Carolyn have you sent a sample for cupping to "thompson" 
? That would be the best way to share your coffee with the list.
Carolyn Cook wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: R.N.Kyle
That sound so exciting, doing something in ones life, that makes a =
difference in others lives is so rewarding. 
Now you hurry up, we are waiting to buy your coffee:O)
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

8) From: David Westebbe
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
  Hi, I'm Caroline,
  Hi Caroline.
  I plug the roaster into a voltage regulator, so it's hard to believe that
it could be a problem with current. Any ideas? Can you give me instructions
how to get back to that question answer format?
   I have a couple of ideas.  But first you need to tell us how to get your
coffee directly from the farmers or coop you work with.

9) From: Carolyn Cook
Hello everyone,
Since several of you have asked about our coffee. I will give you a little background. We are not at the exporting stage yet for several reasons. Firstly, the tribal people I work with have never raised cash crops before. They didn't even know what a coffee tree looked like until I showed them. We began in June 1998 gathering people from the Amungme tribe who wanted to participate in this trial. Their mountain valleys are very rainy so we weren't sure this would work. Actually, it has been more of a struggle with the social issues than with the technology and the coffee. We started with visits to other farmers on this island and bought seed from Wamena. I had tasted their coffee and thought it the most aromatic and flavorful of any coffee I'd ever had.  I'm trying to teach the Amungme everything about how to manage a small business themselves, so we have a lot of activities other than coffee. I'd like to insure that the Amungme get as much out of this as possible which means 
 they need to do as much of the processing themselves as they can and sell it without many middlemen. SO, I really appreciate your inquiries as to how you can buy directly from the farmers. However, we are still perfecting our techniques and getting it right. We use totally organic fertilizers we make ourselves so that there are no outside inputs. We plant lots of nitrogen fixing trees and do multistory tree cropping with some basic foods mixed in. We don't plan to certify organic because of the cost involved. Maybe later. Some time during the next year, I will send you some samples so that we can all prepare for future trade. However, for now this little community right here is buying all of the roasted coffee we can produce.
Aloha from Caroline and the Amungme (name of our coffee is Amungme Gold)
 David Westebbe  wrote:
 
Hi, I'm Caroline,  
Hi Caroline. 
 
I plug the roaster into a voltage regulator, so it's hard to believe that it could be a problem with current. Any ideas? Can you give me instructions how to get back to that question answer format?   
 
 I have a couple of ideas.  But first you need to tell us how to get your coffee directly from the farmers or coop you work with.   
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10) From: John Abbott
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
How really wonderful.  I wish you total success!  Business and coffee all at
once - quite an undertaking.  Good fortune!!
John

11) From: Rick Farris
Carolyn wrote:
<Snip>
Do you mean that literally?  Shades of Kowi Lupak. (sp?)
-- Rick
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12) From: Carolyn Cook
Rick, you made me laugh when I realized how that sounded! Nope, it's not human waste. We have several methods of making fertilizer and mulch. I realize it's not as scientifically measured or analyzed as commericial fertilizer. It's not as concentrated and that's why we fertilize often. We make it by (1) using redworms to recycle paper products, (2) collecting raw vegetable scraps from the mining camp mess halls, (3) using cow manure from the cattle farm in the lowlands (4) making compost from forest floor litter mixed with grass and leaves and sawdust (5) adding needles and leaves from nitrogen-fixing trees to the compost and chopping them up to use for general mulch. I am amazed at how much difference the shade trees make even here in this rainy area. The shade trees we chose are really multi-purpose trees. They are also nitrogen fixing, and we can use their needles or leaves for mulch - they can function as poles for the native beans, and their lower branches can be used fo
 r firewood.
Thanks for your interest - and for making me smile!
Caroline
 Rick Farris  wrote:Carolyn wrote:
<Snip>
Do you mean that literally? Shades of Kowi Lupak. (sp?)
-- Rick
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13) From: jim gundlach
On Thursday, November 28, 2002, at 01:53 AM, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
Lots of people make their own fertilizers, mostly in the form of 
compost or manure teas.
    Jim Gundlach
<Snip>
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14) From: David Westebbe
<Snip>
I used to make bat guano tea, back when I used to do some specialized
gardening.  It was from Jamaica.  Worked very well.  :)
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