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Topic: Is a Blade-type Grinder Ok? (3 msgs / 100 lines)
1) From: Rick Farris
I found this over on a.c and am republishing it here with Mark Prince's
permission:
This message is forwarded from the newsgroup "alt.coffee".
----------- Begin Forwarded Message -----------
Subject: Re: Newbie Question: Grinding Coffee Beans
From: CoffeeKid 
Newsgroups: alt.coffee
On Sun, 1 Dec 2002 06:47:49 -0800, "Alex"  wrote:
<Snip>
I cannot agree with the above comments at all.
Fresh ground coffee with a good burr grinder will always taste vastly
better than preground, and noticably better than with a blade grinder.
And with some good quality burr grinders going for $50 now (Bodum
Antigua, at surlatable.com), there's no real excuse not to get one,
even for drip.
How do I know the taste difference is noticable? It's not just my own
palatte. I am in the middle of doing some research for a magazine
article, and some of the research involved testing for this very thing
- sat down a group of six "coffee newbies" and served them the
following samples from a drip brewer. Lemme dig up the results...
- coffee ground within seconds of use in machine, used a Solis Maestro
- coffee ground within seconds of use in machine, used a Krups blade
grinder
- coffee ground 10 minutes before with Solis Maestro
- coffee ground the day before, with a Solis Maestro.
All other variables (beans used, age of beans, water used, machine
used, volumes used) were identical. Even the amount of sugar used was
identical (almost all the participants wanted sugar, so we came up
with a standard of 1/2 teaspoon for the 4 ounce samples).
In a blind taste test, every participant judged the fresh ground with
the Solis Maestro to be the best cup sample of the bunch.
Interesting second result - the 10 minute old Solis Maestro burr
ground batch won, 4 to 2, over the Krups blade grind (that was ground
just before brewing).
The Krups finished third (2 seconds, 3 thirds). Everyone picked the
day old grind last, save one, who picked the Krups blade grind as the
worst.
Blade grinders do not do the job for quality coffee. They "make do"
for someone who just wants a cuppa and doesn't really care about the
taste (I will agree that blade ground coffee is a step up from
preground, or instant). If someone wants quality coffee, a burr
grinder is a minimum investment in the brewing system one is looking
at.
Mark
--
Mark Prince: www.coffeegeek.com/users/CoffeeKid
Work: www.webmotif.com	   Info: www.coffeegeek.com
Pers: www.spiffle.com		Cafe: www.coffeekid.com
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2) From: Simpson
<Snip>
snip
While I agree with Mark that there isn't much point in not buying a burr
grinder, some fairly impressive folks have supported the idea of using the
blade grinder in the drip context. One in particular is Kevin Knox, author
of Coffee Basics: A Quick and Easy Guide and, according to Amazon, "...
Vice President and coffee buyer for Allegro. As a beverage specialist for
Starbucks he was responsible for appraisals, quality standards, recipes,
training procedures, and brewing equipment...". He espouses a blade
grinder, pour-over melitta cone and a thermos. I'm just not sure about
Mark's statement that (any) burr ground coffee will taste, "noticably
better than with a blade grinder". IOW if bucks are absolutely key then
rest assured that fabulous, no-compromise coffee can be made with a blade
grinder and a few cheap accoutrements. Just not espresso.
Ted
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3) From: Simpson
More about Knox, if you are interested:http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.coffeereview.com/kevin_bio.cfmhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


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