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Topic: commercial expresso makers. (6 msgs / 207 lines)
1) From: Ray Kirkland
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Has anyone considered or installed a commercial expresso machine in their
home?
I have been looking for a semi auto machine for my home. (I use an older
lever La Pavoni) My feelings are that with a machine that is consistent I
will have a major item less in my process of going for the perfect cup (for
me) expresso.
My roasts have got allot better but my lever machine is hard to be
consistent with.
I live in the Seattle area and have ran into 3 or 4 single gang commercial
machines
in a price range of  better home machines and am starting to give them some
thought.
The plumbing issue is not a big deal as I have an ice maker within feet of
the area. but heating times. leaving it on? or heating from scratch?  etc.
thoughts,
thank you
rayk

2) From: John Abbott
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ray,
            I don’t have a commercial machine at home because they take up
way too much room.  There are some very high quality espresso machines out
there if you are willing to pay the tariff.  I happen to own a Solis Master
5000 and am impressed with the consistent quality.  I too was using a LP and
the joy I have with the Solis is that it is quick and more importantly –
clean!!  But if you like to switch beans origins after only one of two
shots, you will be disappointed with the Solis – it holds a shot in the
hopper – so you have to either dump a shot or drink one more than you might
have wanted.  I love it when we have company – they go make their own and I
know its turning out good!
John  - the retired version

3) From: Simpson
I have refurbed and used several commercial units: an old Gaggia:http://mywebpages.comcast.net/tnjsimpson1/diva%20new%201.jpgThe diva is what I use now (minus the Teflon wand. Yuck.) The Gaggia awaits">http://mywebpages.comcast.net/tnjsimpson1/gsa.jpgand a Unic diva:http://mywebpages.comcast.net/tnjsimpson1/diva%20new%201.jpgThe diva is what I use now (minus the Teflon wand. Yuck.) The Gaggia awaits
further attentions. I also have refurbed a 2 group faema due.
In no particular order here are some musings on buying a commercial
machine, the pitfalls and benefits.
I have no doubt that commercial machines, at least at the level of my
fairly simple Gaggia 1 group or Diva, are easier to use than other
machines: they are always hot, no reservoir to refill and they are built of
heavy materials which not only can take the abuse of espresso making but
are satisfying to use.
They are pretty heavy and take up a lot of room, even 1 group machines.
Unless you buy a 110v machine, and perhaps even then, you will need an
electrician to supply 220 to your espresso machine site. I had to have a
new 110v circuit because the heater on my Gaggia is 2kw, and then there's
the pump motor and grinder etc etc. The Diva is a bit more forgiving but
does require a 20 amp 110 circuit.
The 110v machines are harder to buy and find because there is more
competition for them both from small operators and from home buyers. You'll
pay more for a 'lesser' unit, most of the time, I paid 200 dollars more for
the 110v version on ebay than the 2 group 220v version cost at the same
time (the two machines closed within seconds from the same vendor). Shop
carefully. Figure that on any typical used machine there will be some
repair work. If you do it yourself you'll have to have the time, tools and
patience. If you have a tech do it, you'll need $$. Much $$.
You might want to consider a reneka techno... a full-blown commercial unit
in a little more civilized package. Here's a site about them:http://www.justespresso.com/I wouldn't go back to a home unit, myself. I think that most of us who have
gone commercial would say the same. There is a hassle factor unless you buy
new and have it installed. Depends on what you like and want.
Ted
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On 12/12/2002 at 6:01 PM Ray Kirkland wrote:
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homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Isabel1130
I have considered installing one and probably will someday.  Schommer seems 
to think that the big advantage to a commercial machine is that with the mass 
of metal it holds the heat better which makes for better espresso. Schommer 
does not believe that a one group machine has sufficient mass for the 
"perfect shot" Of course, Schommer also believes that it is impossible to 
make good espresso at the altitude that I live at.  One of the reasons that 
you are advised not to leave home machines on (such as the Silvia) is that it 
is too easily for the boiler to run dry without a direct water line.  If I 
had one (and when I get one) I will definitely leave mine on all day and 
probably shut it off at night but get one of those electric lamp timers so it 
will come on about an hour before I need it in the morning. It takes awhile 
for a mass of metal to heat up.  A word of caution though.  You may need an 
actual water line to make a good secure connection.  Take a look at a 
commercial establishment and see what kind of water connection is on the back 
of those beasties.   
     If I were to buy one I would be looking for a Rancillio two group on 
ebay.  That purchase may have to wait until I get the kids through college 
though...:-)  Isabel

5) From: Ed Needham
Ditto.  A commercial machine feels quite a bit different than a home machine.
I could never go back.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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6) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
There has been a lot of demand for commercial quality machines for =
residential use lately.  This happened to restaurant ranges, too.  =
People started putting restaurant ranges in their upscale homes, despite =
the fact that they are a poor fit. The result was mfgrs began building =
to the counter height and depth found in homes.  This new market is =
called prosumer. I have a 5-star range and love it.   I followed suit =
with an Isomac Millenium.  There are other prosumer espresso machines =
out there like the Wega Mininova.   Most have a plumb-in feature. Dan
---- Original Message ----- 
  From: Ray Kirkland 
  To: homeroast 
  Sent: Thursday, December 12, 2002 9:01 PM
  Subject: +commercial expresso makers.
  Has anyone considered or installed a commercial expresso machine in =
their home?
  I have been looking for a semi auto machine for my home. (I use an =
older lever La Pavoni) My feelings are that with a machine that is =
consistent I will have a major item less in my process of going for the =
perfect cup (for me) expresso.
  My roasts have got allot better but my lever machine is hard to be =
consistent with.
  I live in the Seattle area and have ran into 3 or 4 single gang =
commercial machines 
  in a price range of  better home machines and am starting to give them =
some thought.
  The plumbing issue is not a big deal as I have an ice maker within =
feet of the area. but heating times. leaving it on? or heating from =
scratch?  etc.  
  thoughts, 
  thank you 
  rayk


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