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Topic: view window (22 msgs / 593 lines)
1) From: R.N.Kyle
Has anybody ever tried to install a view window in the Alps roaster? I =
believe it is possible, cut a sq hole and form a piece of tempered =
Plexiglas, secured with hi temp silicone.
sounds doable, any thoughts
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
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2) From: R.N.Kyle
Dewardh wrote"
<Snip>
temperatures 
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of the 
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Thanks Dewardh, OK, how do I mold the glass? Glass would be better. 
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

3) From: dewardh
Ron:
<Snip>
believe it is possible, cut a sq hole and form a piece of tempered Plexiglas
Certainly possible, but not with plexiglass (polymethyl methacrylate). 
 Plexiglass is thermoplastic, and is commonly drape molded at temperatures 
ranging from 250F to 350F.  At roaster temperatures it would slump out of the 
window almost immediatley.  Use glass . . .
Deward
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4) From: R.N.Kyle
Thanks to all for the info on the glass window for viewing the roast in =
the Alpenroast. I think it would be a nice feature to have, also a temp =
reading would be great. 
Rick did you say you have an Alp.? I believe I read that someware. Good =
for you , gloat and enjoy. remember the minus 5 CSA pts. for gloating.  =
Have fun:O))
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

5) From: Garrik
I might also caution you on two fronts-
1.  The glass won't reflect back the heat like the shiny metal surface.  You
may find your roasts taking significantly longer.
2. That glass is probably going to get mighty hot!  Keep in mind that during
the entire roast, the alp draws air through that empty space between the
shell and the stainless surface.  If you disrupt that, the glass will
probably heat up pretty good.
-Garrik

6) From: dewardh
Ron:
<Snip>
It's probably unnecessary, but . . . if you want a piece of glass shaped to 
match the curve of the end of the Alp (where you can shine the flashlight and 
look into the drum) that can be easily done (by drape molding over a plug mold 
just like plexiglass, only hotter ).  Find a local "art glass" studio . . . 
they will have the necessary kiln (and other "stuff") and can point you to 
appropriate mold materials.  A pound or two of fresh roasted coffee would 
probably pay for it.  And you'd meet some interesting people . . .
That's probably overkill, though . . . since the "window" doesn't need to be 
very large a flat piece would probably do just as well.  For mounting there's a 
flexible (and "springy") steel H channel available in various sizes, and glass 
rope for sealing.  Check a (wood) stove shop for that, and look at how they put 
in their windows.
Sounds like a fun "project" . . . 
Deward
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7) From: Rick Farris
Ron,
Have you seen an Alpenrost in the flesh?  Adding a window is not going to be
a viable option.  I don't think I can explain it to you, but wait until
yours arrives before you get too far down this path.
Did I mention that mine got here this afternoon and I've already roasted a
pound-and-a-half of Nicaragua "Sabor de Segovia?"
I've got an Alpenrost, I've got an Alpenrost, nanner, nanner, nanner! ;-)
-- Rick
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8) From: R.N.Kyle
YEY WE NOW KNOW YOU HAVE A ALPENROST
sorry Dwardh I mistakenly post earlier about you and really meant to =
post about Rick. referring to the alpenrost.
May Santa treat y'al to something nice.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

9) From: R.N.Kyle
Yeah you are probably right, but I think I will peruse it, and I will =
buy a replacement hood form Swismar, and work on the view window. when I =
get it finished I will be able to switch the hoods, and see if it works, =
if not I'll keep tweaking on it until it does, or not. if it doesn't =
work I'll still have the original hood.
thanks for the advise
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

10) From: R.N.Kyle
Mabey your right Rick, I have not seen it up close yet. I spent 20 yrs. =
in the tool making trade, and this may be something that's not possible. =
I hope it is, because it would be a nice feature.
thanks for the input.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

11) From: R.N.Kyle
Ron wrote
YEAH  WE NOW KNOW YOU HAVE A ALPENROST
Hey Rick, hope you know I was just messin with you. I know your excited =
about getting the alps, and I can't wait until mine shows up. Enjoy the =
moment.:O)
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle
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12) From: R.N.Kyle
Rick that sounds like a really good Idea and would not interfere with =
the air flow lid. I like that, and anyone could do the modification =
themselves.
I was at the other end of the toolmaking spectrum, mostly manual =
machines, producing Dies for stamping operations, and then maintaining =
them.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

13) From: Rick Farris
Ron wrote:
<Snip>
It's PLUS five points, dammit!
BTW, did I mention today that I have an Alpenrost?  And I roasted five 1/2#
batches in 2.5 hrs?
-- Rick
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14) From: Rick Farris
Ron wrote:
<Snip>
I'm a toolmaker myself, Ron, of the computer programming
variety.  It just tickles me to see someone building a
product using tools I made.
Anyway, back to the window.  As someone (Deward) pointed
out, during roasting, the Alpenrost fan pulls air around an
outer sleeve that jackets the roasting chamber, to keep the
outside of the roaster cool and protect the electronics from
heat.  So the cover isn't simply a cover.  It's a complex
two layer assembly with a plastic outer layer, an air
passage and then a [some kind of shiny metal] inner layer.
Cutting a hole through the plastic and the metal and
embedding a window that necessarily blocked off the airflow
between the two would be a bad thing.  It could possible fry
the electronics.
Not only that, but looking into the side of the drum would
be a problem because it is mostly metal.
However, hope is not lost.  At the air inlet (left side if
you're facing it) end of the roaster is a bean cup that the
beans are dumped into at the end of the cooling cycle.  It
seems to me that it would be possible to cut a half-moon
hole in the bean cup (and maybe not even put in a window)
and shine a flashlight into the *end* of the drum to see the
beans.
When I get a little more comfortable with the idea, I may
try pulling out the bean cup during the roast (you can get
it out from the end with the cover closed) and observing the
beans.
It also looks to me like, using the same route, you could
snake a thermocouple in through the end of the drum to the
very middle of the roasting chamber and let it sample at
least the temperature inside the drum, if not the bean
temperature itself.  It would give you *some* feedback other
than smell and sound.  In fact, I'm going to try that
tomorrow!
-- Rick
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15) From: dewardh
Rick:
<Snip>
be a problem because it is mostly metal.
There's no hope of looking through the side . . . one would still not be able 
to see into the drum, just the outside of it.  The only place to put a window 
is on the end . . . right where you "peek" when you open the lid.  That 
location doesn't interfere with the airflow around the drum, either . . .
<Snip>
snake a thermocouple in through the end of the drum to the
very middle of the roasting chamber and let it sample at
least the temperature inside the drum, if not the bean
temperature itself
Be careful . . . it would be very easy to get snagged up on the vanes (with 
not-good results ).  I think that you'll find that getting into the bean 
mass (to measure bean temp) without hitting or binding on something is near to 
impossible.  If you can figure out a way you'll make a lot of friends in 
Alpenland . . .
Deward
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16) From: Garrik
Best of luck with it.  There might be a market for "Alp window kits" if
yours works out....
-Garrik

17) From: Garrik
From: "Rick Farris" 
<Snip>
I "tried" that once- got busy in the garage while roasting, and started
hearing really loud cracks.  Took me a few minutes to figure out what had
happened.  My roast times for that batch were about 1-2 minutes slower than
for other roasts.  Might be ok for those who find the Alp to be too quick
through the first and second cracks.
The day it happened, it was 20F in my garage.   Otherwise, it probably
wouldn't have been a problem.  As it was, I maxxed out the roast time on
setting 15, and the beans were almost (but not quite) where I wanted them.
-Garrik
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18) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Rick Farris" 
<Snip>
1/2#
<Snip>
Hey Rick,
Sounds like you 'might' be enjoying your new Alp! I've enjoyed the newly
revived Alp discussions, been awhile.
It does make me appreciate the level of control possible with the Rosto and
variac and the flexible Rosto batch size. I usually do 1/3# batches, fit
perfect vac'd in pint jars. But I just did three back to back 1/2# batches
in 54min., well because I could! (That's nothing compared to Charlie's brick
oven 4# batches of course) How's that for a nanner, nanner, nanner:-) One of
the batches was my 15min Vienna 470f (for dark part of Kona Melange') -
cooled from 470 to 190f in first 2min of cooling cycle (pushed @130v) then
dropped voltage to 120v for remainder of cooling cycle (5min total cooldown
on the Rosto) ended around 110f. I don't think I'd ever want to roast
without the level of roast control I now enjoy...
MM;-) aka Kona Krazy miKe mcKoffee
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Miss Silvia brewin'
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19) From: Rick Farris
I appreciate it, too, Mike, and if Tom (or anyone else) had a Caffe Rosto in
stock, I'd have one now.  And will, when they come back in.  And you can bet
I'll be bending your ear to learn about it!
One good/bad things about the Alp is that it roasts 8 oz.  I need an
auxiliary roaster (a Rosto) that will happily do smaller batches with finer
control.
-- Rick
What miKe said:
It does make me appreciate the level of control possible with the Rosto and
variac and the flexible Rosto batch size. I usually do 1/3# batches, fit
perfect vac'd in pint jars. But I just did three back to back 1/2# batches
in 54min., well because I could! (That's nothing compared to Charlie's brick
oven 4# batches of course) How's that for a nanner, nanner, nanner:-) One of
the batches was my 15min Vienna 470f (for dark part of Kona Melange') -
cooled from 470 to 190f in first 2min of cooling cycle (pushed @130v) then
dropped voltage to 120v for remainder of cooling cycle (5min total cooldown
on the Rosto) ended around 110f. I don't think I'd ever want to roast
without the level of roast control I now enjoy...
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20) From: Rick Farris
Mike wrote:
<Snip>
That's a funny place.  The office is in Hawaii, but the warehouse is in
Phoenix.  I've never bought anything there, but because I'm about 4-hours
driving from Phoenix, I could get next day service for UPS standard ground
delivery.  I'd have to pay sales tax, though.
You'd think, being in Hawaii, they'd have some awesome Konas, but no, all I
see there is some pedestrian stuff.
-- Rick
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21) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Rick Farris" 
<Snip>
in
<Snip>
bet
<Snip>
finer
<Snip>
I got my two Rostos from Coffee Bean Corral. (hey, they were roasters, not
greens:-) They don't even have it their website currently! Must be some
manufacturer problem in Korea...
8oz is an interesting roasting technique/challenge with the Rosto. The three
1/2# batches I did today on one of them I goofed on my rocking technique and
filled the chaff collector with beans. (I've done it before, will probably
do it again!) Really restricts the air flow. Thanks to the variac I'm able
to compensate without having to stop the roast, as it push it harder (though
was still below 120v). That variac is the best thing that ever happened to
my roasting!
It's really a shame someone somewhere doesn't design and market a decent 1/4
to 1# roaster, profile controllable, fast cooling. I've not doubt many would
pay a Grand no problem. Well, it be a problem but if the unit worked... Just
look at what people pay for espresso machines!
MM;-) aka Kona Krazy miKe mcKoffee
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Miss Silvia brewin'
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22) From: Mike McGinness
The owner just moved to Hawaii last year if I recall.. MM;-)


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