HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Long Roast Times (40 msgs / 1260 lines)
1) From: Blake Andres
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I agree that keeping temperature at a near constant increase if the key =
to avoiding baked flavors. 
I have routinely exceeded 20-25 minute roast times when roasting stove =
top or BBQ  without having baked flavors becoming a problem. However,  I =
have roasted in a WBII with 15-20 minute roasts that were definately =
baked. 
In the case of the stovetop, the "system" temp. ramp-up is slow but =
steady out of necessity for even roasts. I the case of the old and =
well-worn WBII, careful watch of thermometer showed the formerly =
bypassed "thermastat" kicking in and system temp repeatedly backing off =
about 5 degrees (between 1st and 2nd crack) before increasing again.
Since returning to homeroasting a couple of weeks ago, my "new" WBII has =
been giving 15-18 minute roasts. But my fears of baked coffee have been =
unfounded. In the case of this machine, its maximum temp. seems to be =
that that just gets me to the second crack (slowly) - in fact the second =
crack sounds much like the first. The system temp. does not decrease, =
but is very slow to increase towards the end of the roast. No run-away =
roasts with this popper! The challenge is that along with system temp., =
smell and bean color, I have become accustomed to listen for the steady =
increase in speed of the second crack. I have too much time to make a =
decision as to when to quench the roast. I am over-roasting.
My roasting notes from four years ago are less useful than I had hoped. =
Though I am not baking beans, its definately going to take some time to =
get the roasting rhythm down to balance body, brightness, and varietal =
charactersitics. Glad to have this list and all your experience.
Still searching for Riviera espresso equipment users.....
Blake Andres

2) From: jim gundlach
On Sunday, December 22, 2002, at 05:57 AM, Blake Andres wrote:
<Snip>
Which makes roasting over small wood fires more risky.  It could well 
be that the 25 minute baked roast could have been due to a temporary 
loss of heat which could have caused both the longer roast and the 
baked taste.  My concern about the longer roasting time could be a case 
of the fallacy of affirming the consequent.
Jim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fires
in La Place, Alabama
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3) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 Just to confuse things a little more-the temp that needs to
constantly increase (if this is indeed true) is the bean temp,
not nessesaraly the roaster temp. In my case the beans are in a
fairly deep pile and that "exothermic" (sorry) rise in bean temp
continues even though I lower the roaster temp considerably when
nessesary to slow the rise in bean temp. If the ramp up to first
crack is slow and gentle not much roaster cooling, if any, is
needed and steady warming after first crack is crucial. If the
roaster is hotter than is ideal then it must be cooled untill
the bean temps stop rising rapidly. Then quick but gentle
heating to finish. Kinda tricky without a computer controlled
machine. An infared /laser thermometer is making it somewhat
less of a guessing game. It takes a lot of practice and cupping,
that's for sure
Charlie
--- jim gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
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4) From: R.N.Kyle
Blake Andres wrote: snippet
Since returning to homeroasting a couple of weeks ago, my "new" WBII has =
been giving 15-18 minute roasts. 
Blake I'd be interested in knowing about the way you are roasting with =
thisWBII to achieve 15+ min. of roast time.
Have you modified it any?
Does the therm keep kicking off and then back on?
My Popperies, I have 3, will go from roast to compost in 6 to 8 min. if =
left alone. I have modified them all with heater cut off switches to =
control the roast. I shoot for 5-6min from the beginning of first crack =
to the end of the roast. total time about 11-13 min.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle
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5) From: Ed Needham
I baked a pound of great Kenya AA Karumandi today on my BBQ Grill roaster.
Just as first crack was about to begin, I saw the temperature drop, and
drop...annnnnd drop.  Pffffffffttttt.  Propane tank empty.  Dang.  Guess I
need to buy a second tank and tie it in so that NEVER happens again.  Dang.
I salvaged the occasion by getting really industrious and rigging up the
30RPM rotisserie motor I got from Dan.  You will not believe how easy it was
to hook this thing up.  Three 9/32" holes.  That's all I needed to do to make
it work.  Looks perfect too.  It seems the Char-Broil rotisserie motor was
adapted (for what reason, I have no idea) with a bracket to mount on the
fixed metal brace on the grill.  It has one built into the body of the
rotisserie motor, but this one screws on, in addition to the one that's
already there.  Well, I took it off, scratched the location of the three
holes necessary for the Bollinger motor to fit, drilled them and voila!
Motor mounted!  Even the three screws I took out fit the three screw holes on
the Bollinger motor!
To mount the rotisserie spit, I took a 5/16"  2" long socket and stuck it on
the motor shaft with the 1/4" square mounting hole facing out.  I temporarily
just wedged it in place with a piece of cardboard holding it snugly.
Tomorrow I'll drill and tap a hole in the side of the socket.  Yeah, right.
My guess is that the socket metal is really, really hard, and I may choose to
go another route...like epoxy , but I want to at least try to do it
right the first time.   I plugged in a 1/4" to 3/8" adapter into the long
socket so the 3/8" square hole faces out.  Done.  Rotisserie spit fits neatly
into the 3/8" square socket and the whole thing works like a charm.  I can't
wait to get some propane tomorrow and fire that bad boy up.  It is 10 times
quieter than my rotisserie motor.  Thanks Dan!
I was 'really' motivated, and began work building another BBQ Grill roasting
drum from the larger of the two Frontgate waste cans I bought when they were
available.  I really thought I'd be using the smaller of the two cans, but
today I picked the larger one (encouraged by Charlie Herlihy's 4 pound batch
size brick oven roaster).  It's 9 3/4" diameter and about 14" long.  It fits
inside my grill casing, but snugly.  Today I rigged a mount for the bottom
end of the cylinder and cut out the sheet metal for the four 12" long x 1
1/2" high stirring vanes I'll pop rivet into the drum.  Man, bending that 12"
long stuff into an angle with a hammer and a vise is a pain.  ("Dear
Santa...I've been good, with the exception of that exothermic thing.  Please
bring me a metal break, so I can bend this stuff more easily and neatly.
Thank you.")  The stirring vanes are cut, bent, drilled and ready to install
tomorrow, as soon as I get some stainless steel washers or larger pop rivets
(so they won't slip through the holes on the drum).
I still need to fabricate a cone shaped front for this thing.  I have no idea
how I will do that.  My stainless stock is dwindling, and I don't have any
large enough to make a cone.  Drat.  Maybe I'll find something at Home Depot
when I pick up my other things tomorrow.
More to follow, unless my plans change.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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6) From: R.N.Kyle
David wrote:
<Snip>
David I roast 120 grams in the WBII, and 142 grs in the WBI  If the =
roaster is cold to start it may take 2 min longer
roast to compost is without cutting the heater off at all. which I don't =
due, I always profile the roast with the heater off switch, I have =
installed, on each popper.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

7) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
You should be able to reroast this with no problem. Maybe some loss of
acidity, but Kenyas have a lot to spare. I have reroasted beans that I had
stopped after first crack in my slow roaster. They looked like mottled
raisins. I put them in my 3 minute roaster until second started and they
came out evenly colored and expanded normally. The acidity was nearly gone
but the coffee was very good.
<Snip>
If you do not mind mixing aluminum with stainless, you can buy aluminum
angle at most hardware stores.
--
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8) From: R.N.Kyle
Wendy, wrote>
 Same thing for me.  I get first crack in about 3 minutes and my usual
<Snip>
usually
<Snip>
Wendy, to be honest, it has been a long time since I've roasted with the =
poppers, with out profiling with the heater off switch, but if my memory =
doesn't fail me 8 min uninterrupted would be totally through 2nd crack =
and near charcoal, I will try a batch tomorrow to see if I remember =
correctly, and post back the results. wish I had some Robusta :O)
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

9) From: R.N.Kyle
You wouldn't would you Mike, that would be mean, but at least I'd have a =
bean I could take to toast for popper test. 
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

10) From: floyd burton
Was having similiar thoughts yesterday while looking at the various types of
L brackets-AL would be a lot easier to bend.  Also what kind of steel rod
should I make my drum axel from-think 1/2" will work-now is it hot rolled,
cold rolled or hardened.  Will have to cut a slot and a couple of holes in
the axel-hardened sounds hard to drill.
Any thoughts.

11) From: David Westebbe
<Snip>
Just to throw in an observation - In a standard popcorn popper, the air temp
decreases significantly during the course of the roast as the beans lose
density.
During the first couple of minutes, the beans move slowly, and block much of
the air, letting the air heat up considerably as it slowly passes the
heating coils.
After most of the free moisture is lost, the air is lower in temp, due to
increased velocity.
Finally, after the beans crack, the air is moving MUCH faster through the
system, and it attains its lowest temperature of the roast.
I had a problem when I first modified my Popcorn Pumper, in that the air
wasn't hot enough  following the second stage to get to first crack, much
less second.  This was true even with enough beans in the hopper to be a
total PITA during the early stages of the roast, requiring stirring for a
LONG time before the air could move them.  My solution was to install a
dimmer for the fan, so I could turn it down during the end stage, to raise
the air temp. (Before I did that, I just plugged up the exhaust with a metal
measuring cup or some heavy BBQ gloves to slow down the airflow).
I think that the optimal system is one where during the first stage, the
beans move enough  to roast evenly, while still slowing things down enough
in the final stage to attain second crack temps.
It's all a balancing act with coil temp, air velocity and load size.
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12) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
e.  I really thought I'd be using the smaller of the
<Snip>
 I wonder if the 8' length of stainless angle iron I was given
for stirring vanes was an expensive gift. I can hardly believe
you actually made yours with a hammer and vise, ouch! Pop
riviting them to the drum should work, but why not bolt them
just to try and find the best angles, then weld them when you're
sure?
 Roasting 2 or more lbs at a time will present a whole new
learning curve (the deaded "exo" word comes into play) Then
you're going to have to start selling coffee. No way will you be
able to roast only enough for yourself now. Nor will whole sacks
from Royal be good enough for a CSA charter member...(unless
like Tom you hang around the docks cupping every lot that comes
in)  Be seeing you on the coffee trail next season, Ed. ;o)
Charlie
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13) From: Simpson
Darn, that's a funny image. All of those huge conveyors cranking and
whirring, moving tonnes of coffee from hold to dock and in the midst of it
all Tom running madly from container to container dragging a freshroast and
an extension cord, slurping and spitting all the way, frantically making
notes...
Sort of the Red Cupper's Race.
Thank you, Charlie...
Ted
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 12/23/2002 at 8:35 AM Oaxaca Charlie wrote:
snip
(unless like Tom you hang around the docks cupping every lot that comes in)
<Snip>
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14) From: David Westebbe
<Snip>
Ron - 
How much coffee do you use?
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15) From: Wendy Sarrett
Same thing for me.  I get first crack in about 3 minutes and my usual
roast time is 5 1/2 minutes.  If I want a really dark roast it's usually
about eight minutes.  
Wendy

16) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Simpson" 
<Snip>
and
<Snip>
Great imagery. Got me chuckling good. If there's a cartoon artist in the
group, you oughta draw it up and send it to Tom & Maria for their website!
MM;-) aka Kona Krazy miKe mcKoffee
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Miss Silvia brewin'
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17) From: Mike McGinness
From: "R.N.Kyle" 
Wendy, to be honest, it has been a long time since I've roasted with the
poppers, with out profiling with the heater off switch, but if my memory
doesn't fail me 8 min uninterrupted would be totally through 2nd crack and
near charcoal, I will try a batch tomorrow to see if I remember correctly,
and post back the results. wish I had some Robusta :O)
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle
Ron, be careful what you wish for. I still have some Vietnamese Disgusta AND
I have your address! I could overnight express pay out the nose ship for
Christmas delivery so you could "enjoy" it for Christmas... nah, that not be
in the spirit :-)
MM;-) aka Kona Krazy miKe mcKoffee
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Miss Silvia brewin'
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18) From: R.N.Kyle
Thanks David, I have not tried 180 grams I will give it a try.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

19) From: Ed Needham
I am going to try to re-roast them.  If they are ruined, then, hey, I'm out a
few bucks.  I do hate throwing out coffee though.  Painful.
I don't have a problem with aluminum, but I do like stainless for roaster
parts.  I bought aluminum pop rivets today because I couldn't find the ones I
wanted in stainless.  I bet I don't use them though (hey, I know myself
pretty well).  I'll probably hold out until I can get to the shop (about 25
miles away) that has the stainless ones.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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20) From: Ed Needham
Mine is 3/8" square rod.  1/2" is a bit large in my opinion.
I think aluminum would be fine.  I think an aluminum drum would be fine too.
I really like stainless though, so I put up with it's crankiness.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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21) From: Ed Needham
My old Melitta Aromaroast was a poor example of a roaster, but it had two
features that I wish other air roasters had.  An air control and a really
good chaff collector.  Maybe a hybrid could be made to incorporate the guts
of an HWP or Freshroast in the body of an Aromaroast...or vice versa.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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22) From: Ed Needham
I've been selling a pound here or there, but it's becoming more frequent.
You would not believe (No, I bet you would) those that want several pounds to
keep and give as Christmas gifts.  I'm roasting one pound at a time, and
that's not too bad, but I wish I had the big drum ready now.
As to the stirring vanes.  I'm using 20 ga. stainless.  Not too hard to bend,
but a pain to bend properly in 12" lengths.  Slow and tedious.  I'm just
bending them to right angles 5/8" x 1 1/2" and fastening them in straight
across.  I'm a pop rivet fool.  I pop rivet everything.  You would not
believe the workout my pop riveter gets.  I don't see any advantage to
angling them unless I want to use the vanes to help eject the beans.  Do you
think angled stirring vanes would be an advantage?
I wish I knew how to weld.  As an alternative, I've been keeping my eye out
for a spot welder.  They work really well for light gauge metal.  There are
always a few on Ebay, but it's going to have to take a back seat to a few
other expensive tools I need.  How do you say Metal shear?  Break?  Metal
bandsaw?  A MIG welder would be nice too, along with the lessons to use it.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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23) From: Ben Treichel
On Mon, 23 Dec 2002 22:29:51 -0800 (PST), "Ed Needham"
wrote:
I have 2 &1/2 FR Guts. Going to be placing around with
a least one. ???
<Snip>
href="">http://mail.telocity.com/jump/http://www.homeroaster.com">http://www.homeroaster.com<Snip>">http://www.homeroaster.com">http://www.homeroaster.com">http://mail.telocity.com/jump/http://www.homeroaster.com">http://www.homeroaster.com<Snip>
that
<Snip>
the
<Snip>
rise
<Snip>
in
<Snip>
velocity
<Snip>
href="">http://mail.telocity.com/jump/http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mail.telocity.com/jump/http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>
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24) From: dewardh
Ed:
<Snip>
angling them unless I want to use the vanes to help eject the beans.  Do you
think angled stirring vanes would be an advantage?
Not just an advantage, but essential.  Materials tumbling in a horizontal drum 
not only do not always mix, but often actually segregate (by size or density) 
into bands if there is no forced lateral movement.  I can't seem to find the 
best example I've seen of this on the web, but here are a couple examples that 
show what happens.  It is a significant problem often encountered in the mixing 
of solids, and in a roaster could quickly produce very uneven roasts.  Severe 
banding can occur in a matter of minutes . . .http://groups.physics.umn.edu/sand/axial.shtmland click on "reversable axial segregation results"
or:http://pg.chem-eng.northwestern.edu/mixing/papers/IJBC/IJBC.pdfsee especially the picture on page 1469.
In a shorter drum this effect can put all the smaller beans at one end and the 
larger beans at the other, which all by itself could produce unevenness in the 
roast.  If there is any end-to-end temperature difference it would accentuate 
the unevenness.
The entire problem can be avoided with even moderate lateral mixing . . . a 
pair of vanes canted in opposite directions eliminates banding in almost all 
circumstances.
Deward
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25) From: David Westebbe
<Snip>
Hmmm.... I don't do grams :).  That sounds like a half-cup or so (120/28= a
little over 4 ounces).  Try 180 grams or 3/4 cup, whichever comes first.
That should slow down your roast.  If you have to stir at the beginning,
don't worry about it.  The only problem would be if the beans STILL won't
agitate after first crack.
I like to start up the roaster, and then add beans until they JUST stop
moving.  After a minute, they dry a little and start agitating.  This makes
a big batch, and a long roast.  If the beans don't get going fast enough,
and I get nervous that I'll get an uneven roast, I remove a tablespoonful or
so, and they start burbling around the edges.  In extreme cases, I tip the
roaster a bit, and they start getting mixed on the high side.
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26) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
Exactly! What better gift for a coffee snob reletive or friend.
<Snip>
 Deward answered that pretty well. I do have heat differances at
the differant ends of my drum, the back of the oven is hotter
and it's best that the beans move back and forth. Cement mixers,
for one, have oposite angled vanes to prevent the "banding"
Deward mentioned. My new drum will also have end plates that are
lob sided to really rock the basket as it spins on the rollers.
Hard to describe so I'll send pics when ready.
<Snip>
I find it much more convenient knowing some welders who enjoy
great coffee and a few under the table dollars now and then. I'd
rather be roasting.
Charlie
<Snip>
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27) From: john kangas
<Snip>
But it is really nice to *be* a welder who enjoys great coffee, with a shop 
full of equipment to play with! Except for the overwhelming number of 
possibilities; I just can't make up my mind on a design!
Shears and punches and brake presses, oh my! And some of the most beautiful 
scrap bins in town!
Speaking of welders, our shop caffienated drek machine recently brewed it's 
last, and has been temporarily replaced by a Mr. Coffee, an occassion for 
much rejoicing. Huge improvement. Just for fun, I hauled in 12 pot's worth 
of coffee, and set it out Monday with a grinder for everyone to use. Every 
time a pot was brewed, the aroma would spread across the shop, and the pot 
never got past half full, and was empty before it was done brewing. A couple 
folks actually brewed up some of the shop's ultra cheap surplus past date 
stuff, so there would be a cup left when they came back 2 minutes later.
There was a line formed for the Loxicha before it was even done grinding! 
The pot never hit the burner, there were coffee cups lined up to catch each 
drop.
I think the experiment was a success, and qualifies as repayment for all of 
my personal coffee brewing. I keep a drip cone, West Bend Hotpot, and a 
cheapy burr grinder for coffee at work, and the smell when grinding fills 
every corner of the large shop.
John
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28) From: R.N.Kyle
Ed if you cut a series of saw cuts down the length of the vane, it can =
be shaped to fit the cylinder, of course you don't cut all the way =
through, just close, it the make the vane pliable. just a thought.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

29) From: Ed Needham
I like building and roasting.  Sometimes at the same time!
It looks like I may need to figure out a way to angle the vanes at least a
little bit to keep the beans from banding even though all the banding
experiments seemed to use drums without stirring vanes.  I'm wondering if
having fairly large stirring vanes might negate the banding due to the
increased agitation.  I'm also wondering whether banding of coffee beans in
my grill would cause unevenness of roast.  Awww, heck.  I just need to fix it
so I don't have to think about it.
Maybe Thursday.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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30) From: Ed Needham
Interesting stuff.  Too bad all my vanes are already cut and drilled.  I
thought about angling them as I was fabricating them, but realized it is a
much more complex job than it seems at first.  Angled vanes are no longer
straight, but must match the curvature of the drum.  Not an easy task for
L-shaped steel.  Maybe if I put several 3/4" deep x 1" wide notches in the 1
1/2" high vanes in random places the tumbling would be less uniform.
This banding thing definitely explains how all my underwear gets banded into
one layer in the dryer when put in with other things .
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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31) From: floyd burton
Ed what about using vanes that go only half the length of the drum and
stagger them.  also how about using different sized vanes and then maybe a
bit of a pitch one way and then the other.  Ethical drug manufacturer's face
these manufacturing issues but their fixes are proprietary knowledge.  Am
now leaning toward finding a 10 or 12" diameter AL pipe to use as my
roasting drum.  Think cast would weigh a ton and handling a 100# piece of
metal at a temp of 450 is not something I want to do.

32) From: Ed Needham
I'm thinking of cutting these 12" long stirring vanes into 3" lengths and
randomly attaching them at slight angles inside the drum.  More holes and
cuts (arrrggghhh, stainless!), but a better finished product I bet.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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33) From: Ed Needham
I just posted a similar solution on the homeroast list.  Great minds think.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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34) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 07:26 12/25/02, floyd burton typed:
<Snip>
I think this would work well.  You could also consider tapering the vanes 
like fins.  That should be doable even with L stock.
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
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35) From: floyd burton
By tapering do you mean the height of the vanes or the position in the drum.
I plan to do the latter and split the vanes into variable lengths having a
different mix of angles so the beans are pitched back and forth to avoid
stratification.
Tested the latest version of the roasted bean cooler and it really cools
roasted beans off in a hurry.
thanks for the response.

36) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 08:27 12/26/02, floyd burton typed:
<Snip>
I think I mean the first so the beans see a triangle.  High at the front of 
the drum and low in the back.  Most likely alternate them so half are low 
in the front and high in the back.
Checking my front loading washer and dryer, the washer has two vanes shaped 
like
|^^^^^^^^^^|
||
and the dryer which is like
|            ||        |
||  &  ||
Both are straight front to back, no angling around the drum.
It would seem that ANY variation from just straight vanes would do the 
job.  Then it is just a matter of what you find aesthetic and easy to produce.
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

37) From: Ed Needham
'That' is a great idea.
Thanks
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.com
ed
****************************************
**********************************************

38) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 15:57 12/26/02, Ed Needham typed:
<Snip>
IMNSHO, I thought so too .  It is what I plan on using.
BTW, I just received in all of  my component parts for my roaster.  Now I 
just need time too build it.
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

39) From: Blake Andres
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ron-
My prior experience with Pumpers, Popperies, and WBII's have yielded =
roating times closer to what you are experiencing. 
I have yet to modify this popper and am roasting 2/3 cup of green beans =
at a time.  If the therm is kicking off, it is doing so only briefly, =
but max temp is lower than what I have experienced with other WBII's (I =
have yet to check line voltage). No noticeable decrease in temperature =
on the thermometer during roasting. I get a very slow but steady rise to =
about 410F  (Palouze analog therm inserted in butter dish) system temp =
in first 10 minutes and then an even slower progression to a subtle =
second crack. 
I roasted three pounds of Sumatra Iskandar earlier this week - half in =
the WBII and half in a cast iron skillet (25-27 minutes). Though neither =
roast was great, but the skillet coffee was much superior in body and =
richness. The WBII coffee was almost indistinguishable from some milds. =
I have never had much luck getting Indonesian coffees to my liking with =
hot air poppers.
Will keep experimenting with the hot air, but I am leaning towards =
hooking up the propane and looking for larger pan. 
Somehow Roasting Over "Propane in Cleveland" isn't nearly as poetic as =
"Pecan in LaPlace." 
Those of you ready with "Buirning River" jabs can keep them to yourself!
Blake Andres
Blake I'd be interested in knowing about the way you are roasting with =
=
thisWBII to achieve 15+ min. of roast time.
Have you modified it any?
Does the therm keep kicking off and then back on?
My Popperies, I have 3, will go from roast to compost in 6 to 8 min. if =
=
left alone. I have modified them all with heater cut off switches to =
control the roast. I shoot for 5-6min from the beginning of first crack =
=
to the end of the roast. total time about 11-13 min.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC

40) From: R.N.Kyle
Blake, WROTE:
My prior experience with Pumpers, Popperies, and WBII's have yielded =
roating times closer to what you are experiencing. 
I have yet to modify this popper and am roasting 2/3 cup of green beans =
at a time.  If the therm is kicking off, it is doing so only briefly, =
but max temp is lower than what I have experienced with other WBII's (I =
have yet to check line voltage). No noticeable decrease in temperature =
on the thermometer during roasting. I get a very slow but steady rise to =
about 410F  (Palouze analog therm inserted in butter dish) system temp =
in first 10 minutes and then an even slower progression to a subtle =
second crack. 
Blake if your thermostat was kicking off you would know it. when mine =
kicks off the temps *WBII* drop 40+ degrees before it kicks back on. I =
have yet to have the Therm kick off on the WBI, I received the original =
from Les, in the keeping up the tradition portion of this list, Maybe =
Les adjusted, or by passed the Thermostat on this one? I only have taken =
the bottom off to move fan wire. and did not get into the heater coil.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


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