HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Subject: +Alpenrost First Impressions (3 msgs / 92 lines)
1) From: Adam Jahiel
A couple of Alpenrost observations.  I do love this machine. It does,
however, require babysitting. ( In my opinion ). I got mine a few months
ago. I had to  return it twice because of low temperature problems. Each
time I got superb customer service and a new machine.
I have given up on the idea of it being a "set it and forget it" machine.
Mine is very inconsistent at best. I think the only way to roast is to set
it at full gallop, (15) and listen, and smell, and watch the smoke, and
maybe keep your eye on a timer which, again with the inconsistent roasting
makes the time more of a curiosity than a tool.
When the instructions say never leave the machine unattended they mean what
they say. One day, I was in a hurry. I roasted one batch on 12, then had to
go pick up my kid at school. I put on a new batch and flew out the door.
When my son and I returned there was that distinct coffee roasting smell -
but at the foot of our driveway where there should only be rocks.
Yes,  I  "set it and forgot it".  As I got closer to my house the pungency
in the air increased. My house was thick with smoke.  There was a drizzle of
melted black tar oozing out of my shiny new Alp.  The plastic in places had
stated to warp and twist.
I did not realize at the time that my drum was not engaged (take this anyway
you want, but I primarily mean in the actual physical sense ), and it sat it
one position, while the Alp went through it's roasting cycle. The smell went
away a few days later. My replacement Alp came and I still hadn't realized
that it was my fault at that time.  So I watch and listen and read a book or
instructions or the sides of cans cereal boxes or something...
If I don't let my machine rest between roasts, maybe 30 minutes, sometimes
it won't come up to temperature properly on the subsequent roast.
Still, with all the quirks, I have a great deal of fun with this machine.
And I am learning new things every day.
Someday, I am going to take the person's advice  from this coffee clan, tear
into the Alp, and dial up my heat all by myself. Right now, I can't seem to
find the special tool that gets those screws out of the bottom ( they look
like a smal torx head with a dimple or nipple at the bottom just to
intimidate me).  If any body can tell me what fits, I would appreciate it.
Happy Holdiays to all.
A.
(whose drum is still not engaged sometimes!  )
ADAM JAHIEL - PHOTOGRAPHER
90 North Piney Road
Story, Wyoming, 82842
t- 307.683.2862
www.adamjahiel.com
f-307.683.2730
ajahiel
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2) From: dewardh
Adam:
<Snip>
find the special tool that gets those screws out of the bottom ( they look
like a smal torx head with a dimple or nipple at the bottom just to
intimidate me).  If any body can tell me what fits, I would appreciate it.
That's probably a Torx "security bit" that you want . . . your local 
electronics specialty dealer may have one (Radio Shack won't).  Vellman has a 
hex drive set of pretty much all the "security" bits you might ever encounter 
(Torx, hex, tri-wing, four-wing, fork), their #VTBT5, under $20 . . . but any 
place which carries that probably has the individual tool you need as well.
Good luck . . .
Deward
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3) From: Spencer Thomas
I ran into these when I needed to take apart my espresso maker.  I took 
my trusty "Dremel" and ground down the pins until I could get a Torx 
tool in far enough to grab.  I also dimpled the end of the Torx tool, as 
I was unable to grind the pin all the way down.
=Spencer
<Snip>
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