HomeRoast Digest


Topic: roasters (87 msgs / 2229 lines)
1) From: ginny
Hi Paul:
I don't think you need go to a sample or commercial roaster to get a pound of your favorite beans unless you want to spend that kind of money.
I went from Fresh Roast to a Rosto to Hot Top and also got an RK Drum. I carry the rosto around in my car when I got to Scottsdale to see my sister or down to see the kids since they want to "roast" while I am there.
I use the Hot Top for anything under about 9 oz and the Drum for  2 or 3 plus pounds on average.
My Hot Top roasts 80% of the coffee I drink personally since I roast in smaller batches for myself, trying a multitude of beans from Tom's stash! I am sellibng fresh roasted at my local farmers market on Saturdays so wednesdays I crank up the Drum and roast an average of 15 to 22 pounds at this time.
The Hot Top is a wonderful roaster and I do back to back and have since I got it maybe 2 years ago. Back to back is not an issue at all in the RK Drum and it seems to be the BBQ Roaster of choice around here; you can really rig it up to suit yourself and your roaster ego!
ginny

2) From: ginny
www.rkdrums.com
did you read the guidelines Billy? I am impressed.
ginny

3) From: ginny
Lindfa:
I would echo Jerry and others who speak about the RK Drum. I love mine and for sure would get the motor assembly from Ron as well.
I do 9/10 OZ's in my Hot Top back to back which is another choice.
Check RKdrums.com
Ron has a price now for drum and assembly.
The only ? would be a space issue Hot Top v. RKDrum
ginny

4) From: Kai-La-Sha
<Snip>
A heavy anodized aluminum wok will last 100 + years.
  The closest to what you might want is the PRO1500, with
<Snip>
A wok can do a pound at a time.  Price under $40.
<Snip>
Just turn off the gas.
<Snip>
Take the coffee outside in a coarse strainer and shake.
<Snip>
Stick it in the dishwasher.
Regards, Cathy
"If you're not a liberal when you're young, you have no heart.  If
you're not a conservative when you're old, you have no brains."
- Winston Churchill
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: dewardh
Cathy:
<Snip>
While there's no doubt that a lot of coffee has been roasted over the years in 
a wok (or better, a frying pan or Dutch oven) or a stovetop popper, and 
"stovetop roasting" ("fry up some beans, ma") certainly has a sort of luddite 
appeal, what a wok doesn't give is any means of reliable temperature control 
(profiling), or chaff control, or smoke control.  A thermostatically controlled 
electric wok or frypan might help with the first . . . a good hood with the 
others . . . but . . . one can make "cowboy coffee' in a sauce pan, too . . . 
is "being able" enough to recommend it ? ? ?
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- dewardh  wrote:
<Snip>
 Geez, Deward, you've been around this list long enough to know
who your messin' with here, so I'll step out of the way before
the woks start flying. ;o)  However, the "cowboy coffee" you
seem to be sneering at deserves a defender. Properly done, that
is-water brought to a boil, fresh ground home roast added, lid
put on, wait 5 minutes and pour through strainer-pretty much
like press pot. Being common in southern Mexico maybe this is
better named "Indian coffee". Just don't boil the brew till a
spoon'll stand up in it which would then be "fruit tramp"
coffee. Horrible stuff.
Charlie
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: jim gundlach
I'll disagree on a few points below
On Monday, December 23, 2002, at 01:11 PM, dewardh wrote:
<Snip>
    I doubt that any of the methods using variacs etc provides the 
degree of control I have through controlling the burner or even 
burners, deciding volume, stirring style, and rate of stirring in a 
wok.  A round bottom work allows easier stirring than any of the pans 
or dutch ovens.  I know none of them let you smell, see, and hear what 
is going on with the beans as I get with roasting in the wok.  Given 
that the beans we are working with change from batch to batch over 
thermometers that you don't know if they are reading air temperature or 
bean temperature any time.
<Snip>
I always get rid of the chaff - what more control do you want.
<Snip>
I agree, the wok is not suitable for roasting beans in most modern 
homes.  I'm luck to be able to close the kitchen off from the rest of 
the house and open it up to the outside year around.
<Snip>
I know of no good cooks who cook over electric - none consider electric 
woks or electric frying pans serious cooking tools.  I would not even 
consider trying to roast beans in one.
<Snip>
I prefer to roast over wood fires with the Androck over the fire 
popcorn poppers, but I have learned more about roasting with the wok 
and I feel I have more control with the wok than any of the other 
method I have tried.  I will always do the first roast of a new bean in 
the wok to learn how that bean responds to roasting.  I can learn the 
sounds of the first and second crack,  I can learn if there is a pause 
between them, I can see the colors and any sign of sheen or oil, and I 
can learn the smells of the different stages.  Also, It is quite easy 
to take some out at as many as five or six different stages so I can 
try different degrees of roast out of the same roasting.  When someone 
comes up with a kitchen gadget that can do all these things, I'll 
consider it.
Dismissing those of us who use the wok as Luddites ignores what can be 
done with such a basic tool.  But then the Luddites were the first to 
recognize that the industrial economy posed a threat to the environment.
Jim Gundlach
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

8) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
On 23/12/02 23:11, "dewardh"  wrote:
<Snip>
Greetings All,  
I loved this one.  I use the old frying pan over the gas flame method and
find it very therapeutic.  I have considered buying a roaster and could have
when I was in London last week but decided that one more electrical
appliance doing something I can do just as well by hand was not for me at
this time.  Sort of like bread machines (no offense to those who have them
and love them) it is just not the same as the hands on method for me.
Anyway, this (by Deward's interpretation) Luddite is back to the study to
finish cleaning up my Apple Mac Titanium PowerBook which is being sold to a
good home to make way for the brand new, updated model to arrive.  Sometimes
we frying pan roasters just have to keep up with the times.
And, from way too hot and sunny Mauritius, Merry Christmas and Happy New
Year all!
Wendy
Coastal Road
Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
-- 
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

9) From: dewardh
Jim:
<Snip>
homes.
The original post in this thread hoped for a reliable replacement for her 
Hearthware . . . not advice on how to roast over propane in an outdoor kitchen 
.. . .
<Snip>
popcorn poppers
That is to say that although you praise the wok you don't use one more than 
occasionally yourself . . .
<Snip>
done with such a basic tool.
One can still build a barn with axe, mallet, chisel and adz (it's good 
exercise, too) . . . and I still sometimes grind coffee in my grandfathers 
century old grist mill . . . just for old times sake.  Turning the crank puts 
me so "in touch" with the coffee.  Someone else here posted not to long ago 
about grinding coffee with a metate . . . that's more "in touch" still. 
 There's even, as Charlie points out, something to be said for brewing in an 
old bean can over a couple of sticks of fire down by the railroad tracks. 
 Grand experiences, all . . . for Summer camp or for sentiment.  But I'm not 
going to trade in my Mazzer and my Caramali for a couple of rocks and a tin 
can, and I doubt that the original poster is looking to "upgrade" from a 
Hearthware to a (cast aluminum ! ! !) wok over a Coleman stove on the back 
porch for her regular roasting experience, even if she does "give it a try" 
once or twice just for the fun of it.
Oh, and if you can get consistent, reliable roasts without "artificial" 
measurements of time and temperature, or temperature control beyond "toss on 
another log, she ain't steamin yet . . .", well, more power to ya . . . I sure 
can't . . .
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

10) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- dewardh  wrote:
<Snip>
d I still sometimes grind coffee in my
<Snip>
 Old beans can down by the railroad tracks, indeed! (those were
the good ol days, though...) I was talking about a nice clean
sauce pan on the kitchen stove.  A metate grind somehow DOES
make for a sweeter cup. And with enough practice and attention
to what you're doing, consistant and reliable roasts using wood
heat and your own senses are a piece o cake. You probably could
if you really tried, a clever fellow like yourself. ;o) merry
christmas!
  Charlie
 
<Snip>
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

11) From: jim gundlach
On Monday, December 23, 2002, at 08:03 PM, Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin 
wrote:
<Snip>
This Luddite writes on a Titanium PowerBook by AirPort from the kitchen 
so he won't forget the last pecan pie in the oven.  Since I got the 
wireless network, I have burned far fewer dinners.  While the three 
pumpkin pies were cooking, I roasted two 2.5 pound batches, one Monkey 
Blend and the other Uganda, in the wok to take to Oklahoma for the 
family gathering.  As an experiment, I "spiked" the third pecan pie 
with a double shot of espresso.  I'll find out how it tastes on the 
afternoon of the 25th.
Jim Gundlach
La Place, Alabama
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

12) From: dewardh
<Snip>
to what you're doing, consistant and reliable roasts using wood
heat and your own senses are a piece o cake. You probably could
if you really tried, a clever fellow like yourself. ;o) merry
christmas!
Enough practice, indeed . . . but I'm getting old, Charlie, old I tell ya, I 
can feel it in my bones, and it's enough effort just keeping what few skills 
I've got, without practicing all day for new ones .  I lost both parents in 
the last five months, so it's not feeling very "merry" this xmas, but thanks 
for the thought.  Maybe lightning will strike (several times) in Washington and 
make it a happy new year, eh?
It wasn't a bad Solstice, as Solstices go, though . . . .
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

13) From: Mike McGinness
From: "jim gundlach" 
 As an experiment, I "spiked" the third pecan pie
<Snip>
Sounds good. I'd expect the added double shot to compliment the pecan pie
filling very well indeed. You may even find next time you'll add two doubles
to 'challenge' the richness. Overnight FedEx me a piece and I'll tell you
for sure!
MM;-) aka Kona Krazy miKe mcKoffee
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
On 24/12/02 07:09, "jim gundlach"  wrote:
 
<Snip>
Those pies sound great!  This Luddite sits on the balcony with Titanium
PowerBook while the  pan roasted coffee beans  are cooling down in the sea
breeze ...........
Ahhhhhhhhhh,
Wendy
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

15) From: David Westebbe
 However, the "cowboy coffee" you
<Snip>
Makes sense to me.  In fact, cowboy coffee and vac pot coffee are basically
the same thing, except for the straining method.
I was just wondering the other day whether french press and vac pot coffees
are so good because the coffee is fully suspended in the water, as opposed
to drip, which exposes the water to the coffee for a much shorter time.  In
the "steeping" methods (cowboy, FP and VP) all the coffee and all the water
are mixed for the whole brewing time.  In drip, however, much of the water
is separate from the coffee for much of the total brewing time.  Indeed, at
any one time, most of the water is NOT in contact with any grounds when
making drip.
I don't know what this all means, but it struck me, and made me want to try
to make some superior cowboy coffee.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

16) From: David Westebbe
<Snip>
I think that there's an important distinction that needs to be made - some
technology helps to get better quality or consistency, and some does not.
The way I see it, one should use any and all tools which make the job go
smoother, and/or the end result turn out better.
To use a barbecue analogy, we use fireplace sized logs in our pit, along
with about a dozen digital remote-probe thermometers.  So we use both
caveman technology and 20th century technology.  Both are used to get
optimal results.
But we don't use propane, which would be easier and more repeatable, because
the meat would not taste as good.  We don't use a computer controlled damper
on the firebox, because it wouldn't work as good.  Don't even mention liquid
smoke to me!  We don't use stopwatches and schedules.  Unlike some other
folks, we don't use a thermometer stuck into the meat to tell when it is
done - we poke it and prod it and feel it with our (gloved) hands to tell
when it is done.
Indeed, there are many, many types of technology which could be used, but we
don't use them.  This is because human judgment works better, or because
more primitive methods work better.
I'm the kind of guy who wants the best possible result, and I'll use any
labor-intensive or labor-saving technique available to get it.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

17) From: Brice D. Hornback
Okay... I've been thinking about getting the Alpenrost from Sweet Marias.
However, I've also been thinking 8 oz. at a time may not be enough for me.
Unless I decide to build a BBQ roaster or talk someone into selling me a
drum for one... what are my other options?  I don't want to spend $7-10k on
a pro sample roaster.  Is there anything in the $500 to $1k range available
that will roast a 1 lb. batch?
Thanks,
Brice

18) From: miKe mcKoffee

19) From: David Lewis
At 9:59 PM -0500 6/2/03, Brice D. Hornback wrote:
<Snip>
Not commercially. The problem is the amount of power you can get from 
a standard US 110 Volt 15 Amp circuit. Roasting more requires 220 
Volts or some other power source such as gas or wood, and there 
you're into build-your-own territory.
Best,
	David
-- 
Less than 0.1 percent of the U.S. population gave 83 percent of all 
itemized campaign contributions for the 2002 elections, according to 
the Center for Responsive Politics.

20) From: steve_w
Quoting David Lewis :
<Snip>
Or you can make an attempt at stovetop roasting.  The standard electric
stove burner is an easily adjustable 220V powered heat source.  Get a wok
and you can easily roast a lb. or more of coffee in one batch.
Steve Wall

21) From: pcevoli
Hi Folks,
Looking for additional info on roasters. Just started home roasting a few months aog, my wife and I, and friends are hooked. I tend to roast every other, or every third day, and that's just to have enough coffee for normal home consumption.
I use a Cafe Rosto, works fine, get ab FUll City+ in about 7-8 minutes, however I need to perform 2 roasts to get 2-3 days worth of coffee. Maria wrote that normal roaster last approximately 2 years if normal use. I'm exepcting my Cafe Rosto to leats 6-12 months and am starting to look into "the next roaster".  Would a Hot Top be a reasonable choice? Anybody have one and have experience good and bad.
Are there machines that can roast back to back? DO I need to goto a professional machine if I want 1lb roasting capacity and the choice of multiple roasting sessions.
Thanks in advance!
Paul

22) From: AlChemist John
Refresh my memory - how much do you roast in your Rosto?  I do 200 g in my 
WBI and roast back to back and it is alive after 3 years roasting with no 
end in sight.  Les has one going for 18 years.  It is really the "real" 
roasters that tend to have that kind of life time.
Hottop is good if you want to give up profile control (although it has a 
nice one) and can afford it.  You only control the end point.
An RK drum and gas grill will set you up with the best control and volume 
for the price.  Are you set up to roast outside?
I would steer away from a professional machine - too much money and trouble.
Sometime around 05:45 2/15/2005, pcevoli typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

23) From: Les
Paul,
I would ditto Alchemist John's response.  You may also consider a more
hands on approach and try heatgun dogbowl roasting.  It also seems
like the Turbo -Stircrazy modification gives you more capacity.  Again
you will be having to do some modifications to get it working. 
Personally, I used a Poppery for 18 years and it is still going.  I
also like the Wearever Pumper popcorn popper.  When I had to get that
one pound roast because I was roasting 5-6 days a week, I went to the
RK drum setup.  There is no turning back.  I find it to be an
amazingly versatile roaster.  For the price of a Hottop you could go
first cabin with a RK setup that is going to last you a life-time.
Les
On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 13:45:52 +0000, pcevoli
 wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: pcevoli
Thanks for the responses! 
What is an RK drum? I live near Boston so roasting outside is seasonal. Bene pretty cold and snowy this winter. As far as how much I roast, I roast 4/5 of the measuring scoop that comes with the Cafe Rosto, roast between 7-8 minutes depending on the bean.
Paul

25) From: Ed Needham
Take a look at what other homeroasters are doing...http://www.homeroaster.com*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
*********************

26) From: Les
Ed,
Do you have any news on the Maui Mocha?  Are we ever going to see it
again.  That was one special little bean!
Les
On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 10:38:43 -0500, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>

27) From: Bill Zambon
You can google "RK Roaster" for an answer. Supplying any more info
than this would probably violate the list guidelines.
Good luck!
Bill Z
On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 15:31:51 +0000, pcevoli
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
William R. Zambon
First Presbyterian Church, Wyandotte MI
(734) 282-3160
(734) 272-7062  cell

28) From: Brett Mason
Wok roasting or RK Drum in a BBQ will give you back-to-back roasts and
the quantities you are looking to achieve.
Please be warned:  There is a great risk of consuming far more beans
and fuel than you ever thought possible, so stock up.  The stash runs
low quick...
Brett
On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 13:45:52 +0000, pcevoli
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

29) From: Lowe, David
Bill,
You can always email our hosts to see if posting a given URL is OK. In
this case it isn't much of an issue since there is a link to the RK web
site in the Sweet Maria's coffee library.
Dave Lowe

30) From: Terry Stockdale
At 09:31 AM 2/15/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
I've got some of my experiences, including roasting with my RK Drum, 
chronicled on my coffee roasting pages at:http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffee/coffeeroasting.shtml--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My computer tips, coffee pages and forums:
    http://www.terrystockdale.com

31) From: AlChemist John
And that being the case, I don't think it would be a problem.  Ron has 
posted it in the past.
Sometime around 11:18 2/15/2005, Lowe, David typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

32) From: Linda
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I am in the market for a roaster and want feedback on the different models
available before I run out and get one.  I don't want to play with the super
small units as I am roasting upwards of three pounds a week. Would like one
with a 1 pound capacity that doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
Linda in Lakeside 
HYPERLINK mailto:lindafe mailto:lindafe
Roasting in a Cast Iron Skillet
Stitchin with a Treadle
Keep smiling..everyone will wonder what you are up to
A mans got to do what a mans got to do. 
A woman must do what he  can't.
-- 
Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.7/60 - Release Date: 7/28/2005
 

33) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I'd try one of the RK drums.  Any other 1-lb capacity roaster would be both
arms and a leg.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Linda
Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2005 3:52 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Roasters
I am in the market for a roaster and want feedback on the different models
available before I run out and get one.  I don't want to play with the super
small units as I am roasting upwards of three pounds a week. Would like one
with a 1 pound capacity that doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
Linda in Lakeside 
HYPERLINK mailto:lindafe mailto:lindafe 
Roasting in a Cast Iron Skillet 
Stitchin with a Treadle 
Keep smiling..everyone will wonder what you are up to 
A mans got to do what a mans got to do. 
A woman must do what he  can't. 
--
Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.7/60 - Release Date: 7/28/2005
  

34) From: Eric Stevenson
--Apple-Mail-1-1008798841
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetNDOWS-1252;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Ditto on the RK.
Eric
On Aug 4, 2005, at 4:08 PM, Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-1-1008798841
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetNDOWS-1252
Ditto on the RK.
Eric
On Aug 4, = 2005, at 4:08 PM, Rick Farris wrote:

Id try one of the RK drums. = Any other 1-lb capacity roaster would be both arms and a leg.

From: homeroast-admin [mailto:homeroast-adm= in] On Behalf Of Linda
Thursday, August = 04, 2005 3:52 PM
= homeroast= s.com
Subject: +Roasters

I am in the market for a roaster and = want feedback on the different models available before I run out and get = one. I don't want to play with the super small units as I am roasting = upwards of three pounds a week. Would like one with a 1 pound capacity = that doesn't cost an arm and a leg.

Linda in = =
HYPERLINK mailto:lindafe<= /SPAN> = mailto:lindafe

Roasting in a Cast Iron = Skillet
Stitchin with a = Treadle

Keep = smiling..everyone will wonder what you are up = to

A mans got to do = what a mans got to do.
A woman must do what he = can't.

--
Internal Virus Database is = out-of-date.
Checked by AVG = Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: = 267.9.7/60 - Release Date: 7/28/2005


= --Apple-Mail-1-1008798841--

35) From: Jerry Procopio
I've roasted in poppers, iRoast, hg/db, sc/to and most recently an RK 
drum.  My advice, without hesitation, would be the RK drum.  Also, pop 
the extra bucks and get the drive motor that RK offers.
Jerry
Linda wrote:
<Snip>

36) From: Les
RK Drum is the only way to do one pound at a time.
 Les
 On 8/4/05, Eric Stevenson  wrote: 
<Snip>
arias.com>] 
<Snip>
the 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>

37) From: miKe mcKoffee
From: "Les" 
Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2005 4:30 PM
<Snip>
 Les
Is not, can Wok a # no problem...
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

38) From: Ed Needham
Of course I'm an advocate for grill-based drum roasting, but a smaller, 
cheaper option is fairly easy to construct if you or a friend are the least 
bit handy with tools.  A stainless canister, a few stirring vanes and an end 
piece or cone and you have a small drum that will work fine on a 6 RPM 
standard rotisserie spit.
I've built a dozen or so different configurations using perforated material 
or off the shelf canisters and they all work fine.  Ron Kyle's drums get 
rave reviews from everyone who I've encountered who has one, but there is a 
less $$$ solution.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
*********************

39) From: Linda
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Does anyone have any feedback concerning the Aero Roast ll? Looks
interesting, but not sure. Am looking for an electric roaster. Was surfing
on that auction site and saw this,
HYPERLINK
"http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itemu34301551&rd=1&sspagenameRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&rd=1"http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7534301551&rd=1&sspagenameRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&rd=1 auction has ended.
 
Reason being I don't have a gas grill. Still use charcoal. So lets do some
math. RK Drum 225, motor 160 ( plus shipping) and about another 100 for
grill. Guess I should of been clearer in my question.
 
Linda in Lakeside 
HYPERLINK "mailto:lindafe"mailto:lindafe 
Roasting in a Cast Iron Skillet 
Stitchin with a Treadle 
Keep smiling..everyone will wonder what you are up to 
A mans got to do what a mans got to do. 
A woman must do what he  can't. 
-- 
Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.7/60 - Release Date: 7/28/2005
 

40) From:
Linda,
You can easily roast one pound quantities in a Wok. If you have a heat gun =
( 
<$20 @ Homers Depot, et al.), the Wok, and wouldn't mind getting cozy with=
 
the process, as in- your hair is the runway where the chaff will land after=
 
it's done flying!
I don't actually roast this way, but if you read the posts, many do- using=
 
the heat gun (hg) and Fido's stainless dog bowl(db)!
The investment is absolutely minimal and would probably allow you to advanc=
e 
to the RK Drum and a gas BBQ if you want.
My RK Drum will hold 4.5 pounds of old dry green peas so easily, I'm sure a=
 
5 pound batch of coffee would be child's play. Yours Truly could either 
roast the 5pounds right or Wrong. I know- a bad roast would probably work O=
K 
for some brewing method.
I snagged a furnace blower for a quick cool-down blast at the End of Roast.=
 
It's just Kluged together in a mock-up now, but it will sure pull down the=
 
empty drum temperature in a big hurry. The Woman should perfect the process=
 
and Post! Opa will take notes.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 8/4/05, Linda  wrote:
<Snip>
s 
<Snip>
er 
<Snip>
ne 
<Snip>
charter.net>
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the 
Wichita WurliTzer

41) From: Les
Linda,
The only way you are going to do a pound with electricity is using a WOK or=
 
HGDB method. Mike is right, you can do a pound in a WOK. The Hottop is the=
 
other great option but you are looking a a half pound roast which is a 
reasonable limit with 110v and 15 amps.
 Les
 On 8/4/05, Linda  wrote: 
<Snip>
g 
<Snip>
pagename=STRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&rd=1auction has ended.
<Snip>
for 
<Snip>

42) From: Jason Molinari
I roast a pound with electricity on a standard 20A
circuit.
--- Les  wrote:
<Snip>http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itemu34301551&rd=1&sspagenameRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&rd=1auction<Snip>

43) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
And, would cost more than the RK setup, even including the grill and
rotisserie.  
From: Les
The Hottop is the other great option but you are looking a a half pound
roast which is a reasonable limit with 110v and 15 amps. 

44) From: Terry Stockdale
I haven't used that variety of roasterrs - just a Home Innovations 
Precision hot air, a Hottop and an RK Drum.  The Hottop doesn't do a pound.
I agree with Jerry -- go with both the RK Drum and the motor from Ron, 
too.  I built my own motor, and wish I had gotten his.
--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My coffee pages:http://www.TerryStockdale.com/coffee/rkdrum_roaster.shtmlMy newsletter and tips: http://www.TerrysComputerTips.comAt 06:28 PM 8/4/2005, you wrote:">http://www.TerryStockdale.com/coffeeMy RK Drum pages: http://www.TerryStockdale.com/coffee/rkdrum_roaster.shtmlMy newsletter and tips: http://www.TerrysComputerTips.comAt 06:28 PM 8/4/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>

45) From: Gene Smith
Linda,
The only way you are going to do a pound with electricity is using a WOK or
HGDB method. Mike is right, you can do a pound in a WOK. The Hottop is the
other great option but you are looking a a half pound roast which is a
reasonable limit with 110v and 15 amps.
 Les
S'cuse me...I don't know why no one has mentioned the SCTO (Stir Crazy 
Turbo Oven) but, since they haven't, I will.  I haven't come close to using 
the full capacity of the SCTO - believe me, it will do a pound.  And for an 
electric roasting solution I can't imagine what would be cheaper - 
especially if you scrounge around a bit instead of buying new.  In terms of 
the ratio of $$$ to capacity, it's mighty hard to beat.
For some reason it seems to lack glamour, though.  It just sits there and 
easily roasts coffee with little or no fuss.  I'm pretty sure the limiting 
factor on how much the SCTO can roast would be what weight of beans it 
takes to totally stall the stirring arm.  Anybody tried?
Gene Smith
threading the wild learning curve, in Houston

46) From: Larry Dorman
DITTO - DITTO - DITTO
I absolutely swear by this setup if you are on a budget.  You're in
business with brand new equipment for under $100.  I very easily roast
a pound at a time.  I don't even have a desire to try another method
this one works so well...
LarryD
On 8/4/05, Gene Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
ng
<Snip>
an
<Snip>
of
<Snip>
g
<Snip>

47) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
I was going to say that.
      jim
On Aug 4, 2005, at 6:45 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

48) From: Dan Comfort
I do up to a pound at a time in a Whirley-Pop.  You can get them at
sweetmaria's and they're really cheap. And with some practice, they
work really well.http://sweetmarias.com/prod.stovetop-popper.shtmlDan
Redwood City, CA
On 8/4/05, Linda  wrote:
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
per
<Snip>
ne
<Snip>

49) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Me, too.  I could do more on 20A if the drum was larger.  Dan

50) From: gil schluter
I do one pound in my back2basics SS !    no fancy gadgets and no 
electricity!  ( plus I burn off some calories from eating those nice 
pastries that go soooo well with the coffee I roast ) .
On Aug 4, 2005, at 9:31 PM, Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
<Snip>

51) From: Jason Molinari
I'm not sure what the deal is with mine, i assume poor
insulation...i can get the roast chamber up to 570-600
deg, but the heat transfer rates are not high enough
to get the beans to 2nd crack in less than 20 minutes
if i use over 1lb, and even at 1 lb, my ramp between
295 deg. and 385 deg, takes over 5 minutes.
Maybe if i had a bigger drum and the beans were
exposed more to the high temp air...don't know. Not
sure why.
Any ideas?
jason
--- Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

52) From: Dan Bollinger
Probably a too full drum.  After all, if the drum was 100% full it would be
like roasting one huge bean and the outside would be scorched and the inside
cold.  Beans need a lot of tumbling room.  It's probably not a roaster
insulation problem, but rather the fact that the beans are insulating each
other.
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

53) From: Jason Molinari
yeah, thats what i thought too..darn..
thanks
j
--- Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

54) From: Ed Needham
Yeah, shield better or relocate your thermometer or get a better one.  If 
you can't get a pound to second in less than 20 minutes, then your roaster 
temps are not near 500F.  If it really was 500F or greater, I'd say your 
pound would be well into second crack in 12 minutes or less.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
*********************

55) From: Jason Molinari
Hrm...i should shield the TC better, it is sitting at
1/2 drum height over the heating element...
jason
--- Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

56) From: Philip Keleshian
I haven't personally used a SCTO setup however I have watched them at =
the Barefoot Coffee Roasters roast-offs. If I needed the capacity and I  =
planned to roast outdoors that is the setup I would have. 
I use a tricked out Z&D indoors. The catalytic converter and the auger =
stirring were what drew me to that machine.  I can do six oz. batches.
The SCTO seems to agitate the beans as well as the Z&D.  If I ever need =
the additional capacity I will go with it and either set up a good =
outdoors spot or figure a good venting arrangement for the SCTO.
Phil

57) From: HeatGunRoast heatgunroast
Here is a critical question, IMO. Although the choices are not mutually 
exclusive, I'd ask it this way:
1. Roasting a very satisfying and relaxing challenge. If you quit drinking=
 
coffee, would you miss the roasting experience about as much as you miss th=
e 
coffee?
2. Roasting is the best/only way to guarantee a steady supply of the best=
 
possible coffee. If someone were to do the roasting for you (to your 
specifications) would you give up roasting?
Like I say, both could be entirely or partly true. But if number 1 rings 
truer, I'd recommend a heatgun and wok or dogbowl. Note, that with either=
 
wok or DB, about 1 pound is the max that I find comfortable for optimal 
roasts, though you can go higher. I've no experience with drums. They would=
 
definitely by my choice if I wanted consistently to do 1.5 lbs or more and=
 
if I didn't enjoy the hands-on HG/DB process for its own sake. A last point=
 
to consider: The HG/DB takes almost no set-up time. My heatgun, DBs, 
stirrers, cooling strainer, and timer are all hanging on an exterior wall=
 
over my roasting table and grill. It takes well less than a minute after 
stepping outside with the beans before I'm roasting. 
Martin
On 8/4/05, Linda  wrote:
<Snip>
s 
<Snip>
er 
<Snip>
ne 
<Snip>
charter.net>
<Snip>

58) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Phil,
Do you like the Z&D?  I am using the SC/TO setup, but when it rains I
need something for indoors.  Don't have an oven vent either.
Does the catalytic converter on the Z&D do a decent job?  Is it easy
to control the roasts?
I love the SC/TO setup - good volume for roasting, easy to
manage/control, easy to roast by sight/smell/sound.  I really
recommend it, even for small batches.  I don't think I've ever roasted
1 lb. at once - usually about 1/2 lb. of beans and then do a variety. 
I seem to get more uneven roasts if I go much above 3/4 lbs. of greens
in one roast.
-- 
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
Espressing myself in a Via Veneto and LaPavoni
On 8/5/05, Philip Keleshian  wrote:
<Snip>
 Barefoot Coffee Roasters roast-offs. If I needed the capacity and I  plann=
ed to roast outdoors that is the setup I would have.
<Snip>
irring were what drew me to that machine.  I can do six oz. batches.
<Snip>
he additional capacity I will go with it and either set up a good outdoors =
spot or figure a good venting arrangement for the SCTO.
<Snip>

59) From: Barry Luterman
I had one and then moved to an i-roast. It's a good beginners machine. Set 
it and forget it. Plus the catalytic converter is a great feature.However 
the roast are rather uniform and a bit ho-hum. All highlights are lost. It's 
similar to a set and forget it crock pot. The stew is good and easy. But no 
where near as good as a stew made from scratch. My wife agrees.

60) From: Robert Avery
Brent, I have an IRoast ... this has been my first adventure with roasting. 
It couldn't be easier. I think a 5 year old could roast beans without any 
trouble. The real quest is in pursuit of the best roast for your own taste, 
and also trying other types of beans you can'nt get other wise. I think most 
of what I have read says that most fluid bed roasters are on par. I chose 
the IRoast because of it's design ... it has some real nice features when it 
comes to temp control and timing. I also liked the method for moving the 
beans in the roaster. I believe it's worth the extra money. I roasted some 
Colombian beans today and it took me about 35 min to do a pound. The 
instructions tell you to wait an outlandish amount of time between roast, 
but I wait till it cools off and go at it again. I think they do that so 
someone doesn't just start shoveling beans in one right after the other and 
burn the unit up. Hope this helps, Good Luck, Bob
<Snip>

61) From: Mike Simos
The sweet spot for the SCTO (unmodded) is between 8oz-12oz. Anything 
much less seems to just push the beans around and anything more doesn't 
agitate the beans enough. Adding some mods like a spacer between the SC 
& TO and better stirring rods can get you up to a pound. I enjoyed 
seeing your setup at Barefoot on Saturday, I was the one with the SCTO. 
I use mine without any mods and I like doing half pound roasts.
Mike
Philip Keleshian wrote:
<Snip>

62) From: Peter Zulkowski
Good grief!
There are lots of folks on here roasting with a turbo oven and stir 
crazy, and they do a pound whenever they choose to.
Alchemist John does better than a pound I believe (maybe more), with his 
home made rig, and I have done over 2 pounds at a time with my home made 
roaster.
On electricity, using less than 12 amps.
Please stop saying it can't be done.
We 'uns r doin it all the time.
Of course if you want to BUY something to do it, then that is a whole 
different story.
If you want to experiment and make your own, or just want some help with 
the design, there are plenty of folks here that will share how to roast 
batches of more than a pound with electricity. And the coffee is awesome 
too :)
PeterZ
Just my .02, from the camp site, here in Gloucester, MA.
Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>

63) From: Johnny Kent
Gil you must get quite the work out. I've done as much as 600g (21oz) 
in by b2bss but I use a windscreen wiper motor to crank it. More 
usually I do a pound per batch. The last was Oaxaca PLuma Hidalgo and 
it is very tasty. Yum!
At 04:56 AM 8/5/2005, Gil Schluter wrote:
<Snip>

64) From: Linda
Okay so who do I ask about these ?
<Snip>
There are lots of folks on here roasting with a turbo oven and stir crazy,
and they do a pound whenever they choose to.
Alchemist John does better than a pound I believe (maybe more), with his
home made rig, and I have done over 2 pounds at a time with my home made
roaster.
On electricity, using less than 12 amps.
If you want to experiment and make your own, or just want some help with the
design, there are plenty of folks here that will share how to roast batches
of more than a pound with electricity. And the coffee is awesome too :)
-- 
Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.9.8/61 - Release Date: 8/1/2005

65) From: Peter Zulkowski
Hi Linda,
The easiest method is to get a table top convection oven, Sunpentown 
makes one you can get for about 60 bucks, and a stir crazy popcorn 
popper. The SC is a heated dish with a dome over it that also has a 
stirring mechanism in it to move the popcorn so it doesn't burn. Most 
folks disable the heater on this. It is usually available at Target, or 
online. The plastic dome is usually replaced with a strip of sheet metal 
bent into a ring. Or the rim from a spring form cake pan works also.
 Has anyone tried to truncate the dome and set the CO on that as a spacer?
The SC may require additional modification, but it is pretty simple from 
what I have read. If you want to make a Bread machine into a mixer for 
the Convection Oven, that requires a bit more tinkering, but well worth 
the effort imnsho.
If you need any more help email me off list, or we can let others chime 
in on list I bet. Folks here are very creative about roasting great coffee.
Hope this helps,
PeterZ
Still no espresso machine that works, here in Gloucester, MA
Linda wrote:
<Snip>

66) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Linda,
On behalf of the SC/TO (i.e., Stir Crazy/Turbo Oven) crowd, I highly
recommend it and have been using this setup for roasting for nearly a =
year.
It's relatively inexpensive, under $100 even if you pay full price for
everything.  Basically, the setup is the bottom half of a Stir Crazy =
popcorn
popper, which has arms for stirring the beans.  To that you add the top =
of a
turbo oven such as the Sunpentown 2000 or the no-longer-made Galloping
Gourmet.  Do not use a turbo oven/convection oven made of plastic - it =
will
melt eventually.  The clear part should be made of glass.
You can put a spacer (you can use the outer rim of a springform pan) =
between
the two so that the spacer rests on the stir crazy and the turbo oven =
rests
on the spacer.
You can disable the heater in the Stir Crazy, if you like.  Or modify it =
to
add an on/off switch.
The roasting heat can be controlled by the temperature dial on the turbo
oven.  Some folks also hook up a thermometer or thermocouple to check =
roast
temperature.  Other folks roast by sight, smell, time and just temp surf
with the turbo oven's temperature dial.
The good points of the SC/TO setup:  easy to adjust roast levels, roast
time, easy to put away and store, inexpensive, and handles up to a pound =
of
greens (with a spacer).  It can handle more with additional =
modifications.
The only downside is that it's not a good indoor roaster - lots of smoke =
and
chaff.  
Here are some links with more detailed info:
SweetMaria's page (SC/TO setups are about 1/3 of the way down with =
photos
and additional links):http://sweetmarias.com/homemade-homeroasters.htmlThe guy who started it all (just roasting in the turbo oven, without the
Stir Crazy):http://rs.silvergrain.org/Beverages/coffee-turbo-oven.htmlBrent
Roasting in an SC/TO
Espressing myself with a Via Veneto and LaPavoni
<Snip>

67) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
<Snip>
Don't forget, I have a page with a sampling of homemade home roasters 
from list members and others:http://www.sweetmarias.com/homemade-homeroasters.htmlTom
-- 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom

68) From: Alchemist John
Yes, I routinely do 12 oz to a pound, up to 20 oz a couple of times, 
and that is on under 10 amps.  The #1 item to consider with a home 
built roaster IMO is seals and insulation.  Mine is hardibacker 
(cement board), lined with sheet metal.  Every time I added one of 
the internal sheet metal pieces (4 in all, 2 glass windows), my roast 
time dropped at least a minute, all other things remaining the same.
At 19:45 8/8/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

69) From:
Tom:
I forgot you had that great page, thanks for reminding us.
ginny
<Snip>

70) From: owen cox
Ditto on the SS stovetop popper. I regularly do 500gms, to net about a
1lb roasted, relying on hearing the cracks, smoke level and a
thermometer inserted in the top to manage the roasts. After 15 years
of trying to perfect wok and cast iron skillet roasts, I still cannot
get the even roasts that I can from the popper.
owen
On 8/9/05, badabingbadabean  wrote:
<Snip>
the
<Snip>
tches
<Snip>
)
<Snip>
 - - -
<Snip>
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

71) From: Erik Gilling
Where's a good place to find a Turbo Oven.  I went to Target this 
morning.  They had a Stir Crazy but no Turbo Oven or other convention oven.
Thanks,
    Erik
Brent - SC/TO Roasting wrote:
<Snip>

72) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Erik,
The turbo ovens or convection ovens can only be found in two places
that I know of:
1.  The Sunpentown 2000 TO is on www.newegg.com.  Search for
Sunpentown and it should come up in the list.
2.  You can also find Galloping Gourmet turbo/convection ovens at 2nd
hand stores, garage sales, etc.  Might even find the Sunpentown there,
too.  The Galloping Gourmets are no longer manufactured, but very
suitable for roasting.
-- 
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
Espressing myself in a Via Veneto and LaPavoni
On 8/10/05, Erik Gilling  wrote:
<Snip>
n.
<Snip>

73) From: Mike Simos
You can also find them at the San Jose flea market.http://www.sjfm.com/I didn't see any Sunpentowns, but I saw other ones that look identical 
under different names. Like the fujitronic fo-2000. When newegg.com had 
a deal on these I grabbed one which was cheaper then any at the flea market.
Mike
Brent - SC/TO Roasting wrote:
<Snip>

74) From: Robert Avery
Hi All .... I just went out to the recommended site and they have them .... 
you have to put the name in just as  it is spelled, Supentown 2000 at the 
www.newegg.com site. Also ... there are a lot of the Galloping Gourmet out 
on Ebay ... under Oven .... Good Luck ... Later, Bob
<Snip>

75) From: Angelo
Add to that the Dec(o?)sonic. They can be found readily on ebay (~ $20). 
Make sure the temp dial on any that you are considering goes up to at least 
500F. You'll find many American Harvest branded machines on ebay, and 
elsewhere. I would stay away from them. They seem to be underpowered....
I've noticed convection ovens for sale in Asian markets. You might try 
there, if one is near you...
Ciao,
Zio Angelo
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.10.5/67 - Release Date: 8/9/2005

76) From: Erik Gilling
Brent - SC/TO Roasting wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks, I just ordered one.  I can't wait to be able to roast more than 
my popper will do now.
Cheers,
    Erik

77) From: Peter Zulkowski
 From my experience with turbo ovens, the dial is not very accurate for 
showing the actual temperature. The Galloping Gourmet has a stop on it 
at 500F, and I had to remove the stop so I could get the temp up to even 
450F. All temps taken with a digital thermocouple readout. If you leave 
the dial at one setting the powered cycles on and off with about a 40F 
variance also. YMMV.
So with the stop removed, I manually turn the dial until the power comes 
on, and turn it back when I want to stay at that temperature (or near it).
Again, the dial is not even close to the actual temperature in the oven. 
The GG has nearly 1500 Watts of power, and the Sunpentown about 1200 
Watts IIRC.
People have great results with the lesser powered unit, but don't go 
below that. IMO more power is always better.
PeterZ
about to roast another pound, here in MA.
Angelo wrote:
<Snip>

78) From: Tomenid
Why is it that coffee roasters have such lousy heating systems? My first  
IRoast had a faulty system that roasted coffee to ash in under 10 minutes, 
the  second worked for a few months, then at eight minutes proceeded to heat 
up to  high levels and burn everything to ash. My first Gene had a faulty 
thermostat  that again turned beans to ash in a matter of minutes and then 
melted most of  the machine. Two others went the other direction, with the 
thermostat failing to  go over 450F. And all of this after cleaning after each 
use and relatively minor  use.
 
Tom
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

79) From: Barry Luterman
My first thought is the electricity in your home. That is, that you get a
lot of power spikes which are taking down your small appliances. If so you
may have to add a Variac to your roasting equipment/
On Wed, May 19, 2010 at 8:13 AM,  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

80) From: Derek Bradford
Simple.  Cheap parts and manufacturing are the only way to produce these
limited-market machines.  They'd have to sell many, many more than they have
customers for to use quality parts and engineering.  Look how crappy most
North American-made cars are, despite selling millions and millions of them
and throwing decades of R&D at them.  Now imagine how bad those cars would
be if they only sold a thousand a year and nobody could afford to put more
than a garage tinkerer's worth of R&D into them.  It's amazing that the
roasters work as well as they do at all.   Ask Joe Behm how hard it is, and
he has put out a pretty high quality product.
--Derek
On Wed, May 19, 2010 at 3:13 PM,  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Every path but your own is the path of fate.  --Thoreau
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

81) From: F.R. Parth
If you bought several machines from the same manufacturing batch and they failed one after the other, you can blame the cheap manufacturer.
But multiple machines from different manufacturers indicate a different cause for your problems. Most like your electricity supply is fluctuating and especially spiking. Are there frequent lightening storms in your area or other major weather? 
Install a filter in the line and see how a cleaner power source helps. 
On Wednesday, May 19, 2010, at 11:13AM,  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

82) From: F.R. Parth
If you bought several machines from the same manufacturing batch and they failed one after the other, you can blame the cheap manufacturer.
But multiple machines from different manufacturers indicate a different cause for your problems. Most like your electricity supply is fluctuating and especially spiking. Are there frequent lightening storms in your area or other major weather? 
Install a filter in the line and see how a cleaner power source helps. 
On Wednesday, May 19, 2010, at 11:13AM,  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

83) From: raymanowen
"...you may have to add a Variac to your roasting equipment"
By that reasoning, electric ranges, ovens, toasters and hair dryers should
have been extinct for the past century. The Variac is an auto transformer-
the primary and secondary are incorporated in a single, tapped (toroidal)
winding.
The Tetrode vacuum tube is a particularly non-linear electric valve. You put
Liberace on the grid, but you don't exactly get Lee on the plate/ primary of
the output transformer. Absent some ringing, what goes on the primary of a
transformer is the exact wave shape you will get on the secondary and
speaker voice coil/ cone excursion/ sound pressure waves you hear.
To harness the efficient but non-linear tetrode (or beam power tube) for
audio use, the ultra linear output transformer provides negative feedback
for the screen grid to make the tetrode's transconductance more linear.
The plate current is a high-fidelity (Hi-Fi) image of the control grid's
potential waveform. The plate current goes through the transformer primary.
The secondary goes to the speaker voice coil.
Variacs, and most other transformers are not electronic mufflers. Put spikes
and brownouts in, and that's exactly what you will get out unless you stand
there and keep varying your Variac.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
If it feels good, twist your Variac...
Got Grinder?
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

84) From: Allon Stern
On May 20, 2010, at 4:22 AM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Okay, put on a ferroresonant transformer.
Variacs will allow for trimming out-of-spec voltage, as long as it's constantly out of spec.
I think the main problem is that the control system of the iRoast *LIES*; if you adjust your "profile" with an understanding of the lies, then you can get good roasts out of it.
I've mostly switched to heatgun roasting, though I do still occasionally use the iRoast (like when its raining - heatgun roasting is an outdoors activity)
-
allon
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

85) From: Mike Chester
I completely agree with you on why roasters are poorly made, but you are 
dead wrong about American cars.  What you say was, unfortunately, true about 
25-30 years ago, but is no longer the case.  Of the 5 cars rated as best in 
initial quality this year, 4 are built by GM or Ford.  Back in the 70s and 
80s, we definitely dropped the ball.  Cars were poorly built and most were 
gas guzzlers.  When the oil shortages came, the only companies producing 
cars with good mileage were foreign.  The Japanese car makers made, and 
still do make good products and I can see why someone who switched to them 
in the 80s would have no reason to switch back, but our cars are now again 
world class.  My wife drives a 2002 Chevy Trailblazer with 140,000 miles on 
it and it still looks and runs like new.  All we have ever done to it is 
routine maintenance.  In fact, it had its first tune-up last week.  Toyota 
has had a problem with unexpected full throttle acceleration with some of 
its vehicles for quite awhile, but has denied its existence and tried to 
cover it up.   They still won't admit that it is a computer problem, even 
when shown strong evidence, as a large scale recall of their cars for 
computer replacement would be very costly.  It is cheaper to settle a few 
wrongful death lawsuits than to fix the problem.  This is the same mistake 
the American manufacturers made years ago, and I am surprised that they did 
not learn from our errors.  In the 70s a memo to that effect at Ford 
surfaced where an analysis of their exploding gas tanks indicated that it 
would cost less to pay the victims families a settlement than to fix the 
defect.  When this surfaced, they were vilified in the press and still are 
trying to live down the embarrassment.  Since I am obviously not a fan of 
foreign cars, part of me hopes that Toyota continues on this path and ruins 
its reputation, but people are dying and being maimed and getting this 
corrected is the most important thing that they can do.
I am sorry for this off topic rant, but I get really tired of constantly 
hearing that Americans no longer know how to build things well.  Lately we 
do seem to be infected with the "Wal-Mart" syndrome where low cost trumps 
all else.  I hope that we can get over it.  We all roast our own coffee for 
the much higher quality (plus it's fun) not to save money, so we can 
appreciate at least one example.
Mike - now off the soap box - Chester
--------------------------------------------------
From: "Derek Bradford" 
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 2:27 PM
To: "A list to discuss home coffee roasting. There are rules for this 
list,available athttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html"
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Roasters
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

86) From: Mike Chester
A Variac does nothing to remove spikes.  It simply supplies a steady rate 
change to whatever is put in.  The output can, for example, be set at 110% 
so if you have only 100 volts in, you will get 110 volts out, but if the 
input spikes to say 130 volts, the output will spike to 143 volts. (110%) To 
remove spikes you need at least a surge suppressor.  A line conditioner 
would be optimal, but they are quite expensive.  For the EEs out there, this 
is a simplified explanation. I know that the autotransformer does supply a 
slight inductance filtering, but at line frequency it is negligible.
Mike Chester
--------------------------------------------------
From: "Barry Luterman" 
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 2:23 PM
To: "A list to discuss home coffee roasting. There are rules for this 
list,available athttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html"
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Roasters
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

87) From: raymanowen
You must know, I, Too am no EE. Open door, light goes on in the fridge, Push
button, bell rings... About that "bell..."  ro
-- 
Persist in old ways; expect new results - suborn Insanity...
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://host.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20


HomeRoast Digest