HomeRoast Digest


Topic: homeroast digest, Vol 1 #1000 - 39 msgs (116 lines)
1) From: Kai-La-Sha
Cathy:
<Snip>
And "profile roasting" is the non-uniform application of heat to
deliberately 
vary the rate and "condition" of a roast . . . something which I suggest
is 
more easily done with "technical assistance" (and accurate measurement),
even 
if it *can* be done without.  
By "uniform", I was referring to the application of the heat uniformly
to each and every bean alike.  Profiling a roast is very easily done in
a wok, an one has direct control of all the variables, i.e. flame,
spoon, hand, and exhaust fan. 
Of course a lot depends on what tools one is 
comfortable with . . . I happen to be comfortable with (some )
technology, 
and like the benefits that the additional "complexity" can bring enough
to put 
up with it.  Other people these days seem to prefer the convenience that 
"automation" brings . . . and they want to have the benefits of
"complexity" 
without having to deal with the details.  
Of course automation is a good thing, but at what price?  As an
economical and reliable replacement for a complex and somewhat fragile
machine, the wok has no equal - and that was the original question,
wasn't it?  It requires no electricity, no variac, it will never burn
out it's circuit board, or plastic components, and does not require
repairs - ever!
 
<Snip>
gas flame, on the same range with the same exhaust fan, at the same
ambient indoor temperature, with the same agitation of the beans by the
same cook's hand, can produce just as consistent, reliable results as
any machine can deliver.
How would one know, without measuring what's happening in both cases* ?
? ?  
Deward, Results stand alone.  They are not the process.  What's
"happening" is the process. The repeatability of the process is
dependent on control of all the variables. The result is the conclusion
of what has happened, and is measured independently.  The results with
the wok are superior to the results with the FR+, by all my evaluators'
reports.  They have no idea "what happened".  They just taste the
coffee.
Wishful thinking?  And, even if true, what does one say to people who
simply 
want good fresh-roasted coffee, but have neither the time nor the
inclination 
to develop a "skill" at the "art" (or "craft") of frypan roasting?
Of course the ultimate solution for the folks who do not have the time
or inclination, is to have someone else do it for them.  Or, for those
who enjoy spending money on multiple generations of gadgets, a steady
stream of expensive toys. (how many guys on this list admit to having 4
or 5 different roasters in varying stages of disrepair? Some have, by
all accounts, a garage full of machines taking up space!)  (The Wok goes
in the pots and pans drawer when it is finished with it's task.)  It is
really quite easy, and instructive - puts you on a very intimate level
with the roasting process - no Stainless steel or glass in the way of
your sensory appreciation of the process.
In my youth I became quite accomplished at the "art" of the "tune up" .
.. . 
points, plugs, carburetor adjustment, all that stuff.  I probably even
remember 
most of those skills (overlearned responses, etc. ).  But I prefer 
never-need-replacing Platinum electrode spark plugs, breakerless
electronic 
ignition, computer adjusted fuel injection, and all that other modern,
"high 
tech" stuff that just lets me drive (even as I decry the incompetence of
the 
can't-fix-anything generation ).  And while I can, and have, made an
at 
least competent Hollandaise "from scratch", I'm now much more inclined
to let 
Ms. Knorr do the prep work for me.
Poor fellow!  Cracking the eggs and separating the yolks in your hand is
a sensual experience not to be dismissed as an irksome chore! 
I don't believe that any "home roaster" has all the kinks worked out (I
said 
that in my first post, didn't I?), nor do I believe that one cannot get
a good 
roast doing it like grandma did (and a lot of people still do).  But . .
.. my 
grandmother made her own soap in the garage, and preferred her "tub and 
wringer" to any "newfangled contraption" (she bought a new one while in
her 
seventies . . . probably one of the last ones made ).  Shall we sing
the 
praise of home rendered soap and hand wrung linen now, too ? ? ?  Is
that what 
we recommend when someone asks about replacements for a worn out White 
Westinghouse front loader?
Or a six month old burnt out Hearthware, perhaps?  I rather see the
direct roasting of coffee as a simple chore akin to any other cooking
task like frying.  Whether you do it in a pot or an expensive electric
deep fryer, the results are quite comparable, and you can put the pot in
the drawer after it comes out of the dishwasher.
Cheers, cathyhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.lhasa-apso.org/xmascard.jpghomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


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