HomeRoast Digest


Topic: wok roasting and the chocolate torte (63 lines)
1) From: Kai-La-Sha
First off, Lee, who posted the chocolate espresso torte recipe, should
be arrested for possession of a deadly weapon!  It is a killer! 
Gentlemen, if the lady is not yet married, do yourselves a favor and
propose immediately!
I used a pound of Scharfenburger bittersweet, some good Danish butter,
and my Mokha Ismaili espresso.  I altered the recipe for my large
springform pan, by adding a base layer of crushed chocolate wafers and
butter spiked with about 1/3 cup of powdered coffee beans.  I also added
a package of cream cheese to the cake for extra volume.  It was
awesome!  Came out of the pan easily too, and holds it's shape well.  My
daughter served it at Christmas dinner to her inlaw's - (big family). 
They all wanted to know where she got the unusual and scrumptious cake! 
The next day, I served the leftover cake to the rest of my family,
adding some macerated raspberries and a dollop of creme fraiche.  You
can only eat a 1/2 inch wedge of this cake at one sitting, or risk
O.D.'ing from chocolate poisoning. My cake served about 20 and there is
still a little bit left.
Next.  To the gentleman who inquired about wok roasting.  I use a cast
aluminum wok which is black anodized, and about 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick.
It is a knockoff of the Calphalon product.  With that I use a stainless
pancake turner whose front edge has a curve that just matches the
internal arc surface of the wok.  I preheat the wok for several minutes
over high (gas) flame.  Then I dump in up to a pound of greens. I slowly
move the beans from the center of the wok up onto the sides. This
ensures that every bean gets a turn at the center where the heat is
maximum.  First crack starts at from 6 to 8 minutes if the wok is well
preheated. First crack can take quite a long time to complete. Depending
on the bean, second crack follows within another 6 to 10 minutes. 
One drawback to this method is that the silverskin on some beans does
not come off, making the roast look uneven.  These beans are quite done
if you crack them open however. The chaff comes off easily in a large
wide mesh strainer.  I empty the wok into it and immediately go outside
and shake the strainer.  The chaff has been well cooked and rendered
into quite small pieces, and falls through the mesh, so that by the time
the beans are cooled to handling temperature, they are nice and clean.
Though this method does not produce a roast in which every bean looks
precisely like every other, the flavor is much richer, smoother and more
complex than what the FR+ puts out.  And since the process is
substantially slower, I have better control of the endpoint - (easier to
catch a baseball than a bullet.)
Of course your results will vary from mine depending on the heat of your
flame, the thermal characteristics of your wok, the amount of coffee,
and your stirring technique.  I have found that constant vigorous
agitation is unnecessary, just a slow steady tumbling movement of the
beans from the middle to the sides of the wok produces a nicely "done"
roast.
 
Regards, Cathy
"If you're not a liberal when you're young, you have no heart.  If
you're not a conservative when you're old, you have no brains."
- Winston Churchill
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