HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Chaff (76 msgs / 1531 lines)
1) From: Hugh Solaas
Chaff starts coming off at about 200 degrees F, well below the temperature
and time of the first crack.
--H.

2) From: Alex McGregor
Using an Alp to roast Kenyan Eaagads to a city or full city range typically
leaves quite a bit of chaff on the beans. I've noticed the HWP does a much
better job of blowing off the chaff during the cooling cycle.
My question is:  How does chaff affect the final product in terms of taste.
Is it something to be concerned about?
Has anyone performed a taste test?
Alex
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3) From: Ed Needham
A taste test is easy.  Take a tablespoon or so of chaff and pour over
boiling water.  Let steep  three or so minutes, pour through a tea strainer
and sample the water.  That's the taste you can remove from your coffee by
removing more chaff.  To me, it's an undesirable 'grassy' taste, with
astringent qualities, bordering on bitter (that thick 'tongue feel').
I used to use a blow dryer out in my garage to blow out the excess chaff
after grinding the beans.  At the time, I felt it made a significant
difference in the quality of the cup.  I'm not really sure why I stopped
doing that...hmmmm.
Regards,
Ed Needham

4) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
Does the chaff require 3 minutes to give grassy quality? Since chaff
seems to be thin tight skin, it is natural to expect (though I did not
test for it) that it takes time to add its undesirable astringent
bitterness, and it might be significantly reduced if the coffee is
brewed quickly.
R
From: "Ed Needham" 
Subject: Re: +Chaff
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2001 03:01:27 -0400
<Snip>
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5) From: Ed Needham
Actually you can put a pinch of it in your mouth and taste the undesirable
flavor immediately...bleeeccchhh!
Ed Needham

6) From: susan oppenheim
I would like some feedback about chaff
why some coffees when roasted-like the central americans-have so much
chaff
yet some africans have so little
and some decaf green I have produces none...............
and if you wok roast
can you get all the chaff out ?
does it matter much if you don't get it all off?
I have a cute machine that separates it for me.
thanks
Susan O

7) From: jim gundlach
When I wok roast, I spread the beans out on a two foot square griddle 
to cool.  When I pull them up into a pile to put in a canister most of 
the chaff stays on the griddle.  I simply wipe it up with a damp 
sponge.  If I get a little in the coffee I don't worry about it.
   Jim Gundlach
On Thursday, April 3, 2003, at 02:55 AM, susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: jim gundlach
When I wok roast, I spread the beans out on a two foot square griddle 
to cool.  When I pull them up into a pile to put in a canister most of 
the chaff stays on the griddle.  I simply wipe it up with a damp 
sponge.  If I get a little in the coffee I don't worry about it.
   Jim Gundlach
On Thursday, April 3, 2003, at 02:55 AM, susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: susan oppenheim
so-no one tackled my query of the other day
why do some beans have so much more chaff
why do decaf beans have almost no chaff
Susan Oppenheim
TOM???

10) From: espresso gin
Susan:
I must have missed the posting.
When I roasted the Monkey Blend Espresso it had tons of chaff, the Sulawesi
aged kalossi virtually none.
The reason, don't know put perhaps it has to do with the way the beans are
dried/washed at their point of origin.
ginny

11) From: David Lewis
At 9:58 AM -0500 4/5/03, susan oppenheim wrote:
<Snip>
Well, in the absence of someone who knows what they're talking 
about... I'll step in.
<Snip>
Dry-processed beans tend to have more than wet-processed ones, 
because some of the silverskin is removed in the soaking process. In 
dry-processing, the cherry is allowed to dry on the bean, and then 
it's all mechanically removed, a less precise (but in some cases at 
least, more flavorful) method.
<Snip>
They're soaked several times, as already processed beans, as part of 
getting the caffeine out. Tom and Maria have a detailed description 
of the decaffeination process on their web site.
Best,
	David
-- 
Less than 0.1 percent of the U.S. population gave 83 percent of all 
itemized campaign contributions for the 2002 elections, according to 
the Center for Responsive Politics.

12) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- espresso gin  wrote:
<Snip>
 I missed it too, can't get Susan's posts. Dry processed beans
are harder to dehusk as cleanly as washed ones, and have more
chaff. Some varieties are more concave (Caturra, Bourbon etc.)
and hang on to more skin when dehusked. Sometimes the dry mill
is getting worn or needs cleaning and adjustment and leaves more
skin. Sometimes beans from the bottom of a sack that's been
stored a long while have collected fine chaff dust from the rest
of the sack. JBM., PRYS, Kona, Sulawesi and other Typica variety
washed beans milled in modern facilities tend to have the least
 chaff.
Charlie
=====
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13) From: Lee XOC
< On Behalf Of Oaxaca Charlie
< Sent: Saturday, April 05, 2003 8:26 AM
<
<  I missed it too, can't get Susan's posts. Dry processed beans
< are harder to dehusk as cleanly as washed ones, and have more
< chaff. Some varieties are more concave (Caturra, Bourbon etc.)
< and hang on to more skin when dehusked. Sometimes the dry mill
< is getting worn or needs cleaning and adjustment and leaves more
< skin. Sometimes beans from the bottom of a sack that's been
< stored a long while have collected fine chaff dust from the rest
< of the sack. JBM., PRYS, Kona, Sulawesi and other Typica variety
< washed beans milled in modern facilities tend to have the least
<  chaff.
Isn't it also true that the less hybridized types tend to be more
natural, or less refined, or often have a lot more chaff?  I'm thinking
for example of the Yemeni beans which are about the chaffiest I can
think of.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
---------------------------------

14) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 They're natural processed, un-washed beans. Also such a mix of
sizes, barely screened, and very hard to dry mill evenly. Many
are actually (or so I've read) dehusked by hand, pounded in
morters with wooden mallets. All the above results in plenty of
chaff.
Charlie
--- Lee XOC  wrote:
..
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15) From: Richard Clancy

just a dumb guess, but perhaps in the decaf process of soaking and drying it has already come off the bean.

 > >so-no one tackled my query of the other day > >why do some beans have so much more chaff > >why do decaf beans have almost no chaff > >Susan Oppenheim > > >TOM??? > > > >homeroast mailing list >http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast >To change your personal list settings, seehttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html
STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*

16) From: Al Williams
What do you folks do with the chaff?  Is it alright to spread it in 
the garden, or on the lawn?
Al

17) From: Michael Wascher
Toss it into the wind.
On 12/13/06, Al Williams  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Of course the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you--if you don't play,
you can't win." --Robert Heinlein

18) From: Aaron
chaff works fine in the garden, around house plants, wherever you want 
to put it at.  It won't hurt a thing and makes good mulch actually.

19) From: Gary Townsend
I add it in to my compost pile, along with all the spent coffee grounds. And
I am getting every cents worth out of those beans. Worms love coffee
grounds!!!
Gary
 Al Williams wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Bernard Gerrard
I roast out doors and let "Ma Nature" take the chaff where she wants 
to.  It is organic. Also;  my coffee grounds, when cool, go to the 
flower beds.  An excellent soil improver.  A published paper some years 
ago described the efficacy of caffeine as a slug/snail killer.  DON'T 
waste perfectly good coffee on slugs'nsnails for there is not enough 
caffeine there to do the deed.  Perhaps the minute amount in the spent 
grounds gives them a stomach ache and sends them elsewhere?  Bernard

21) From: Ken Mary
A few days ago I made some chaff tea. The entire load of chaff from a 1/4 
pound roast was brewed in 7 ounces of water using a filter method. The chaff
was from my drum roaster which keeps it in the drum until dumpout, so the
chaff is roasted. It tastes like a mixture of extremely weak tea and coffee.
This should ease the minds of some people worried about residual chaff
affecting coffee taste.
--
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>

22) From: jim gundlach
Al,
    Remember that the coffee bean is really a seed and that any seed  
is just a baby plant with the food they need to get them started in  
life.  That is why any and all parts of the coffee bean make such  
good fertilizer.  That would include the chaff as well as the used  
grounds.
    Pecan Jim
On Dec 13, 2006, at 10:47 PM, Al Williams wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Brett Mason
I roast outside on my patio - whether 95 degrees or -10 degrees (takes
more gas)..  The Chaff I just dump out in the grass - direct
application of future compost...  Nitrogen has to be good for the
yard....
With a popper, this is easy as my collander collects the chaff just
prior to 2nd crack....
Also, I sweep dropped beans out to the yard too.
NOTE - I do not have any Canines out there, so walking in my yard is
ALWAYS a joy, barefoot or not.  I do get to appreciate the neighbors'
dogs who stay in their yards and bark....  Maybe they will like
caffeine?  I could try feeding the neighbor dogs and see if they drive
their owners nuts - that is a holiday entertainment plan just waiting
to happen!
What great ideas this list provokes!
Brett
On 12/14/06, jim gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

24) From: Eddie Dove
Coffee bean cannon ...
On 12/14/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Eddie Dove
Sharks on caffeine ...
On 12/14/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: Brett Mason
attorneys...
On 12/14/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

27) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Feed it to the fishies!
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Persian Gulf
 "On station and on point 141 and counting down..."

28) From: Alison Pfeffer
--Apple-Mail-1-1012549013
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
That's funny--I always toss it into the wind.  I don't know why, but  
it's very satisfying.
Alison
On Dec 14, 2006, at 8:41 AM, homeroast-request  
wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-1-1012549013
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
That's funny--I always toss it =
into the wind.  I don't know why, but it's very satisfying.
Alison
On Dec 14, = 2006, at 8:41 AM, homeroast-request@= lists.sweetmarias.com wrote:

Date: Thu, 14 Dec 2006 = 04:43:31 -0500

From: "Michael Wascher" <wascher>

=

To: homeroast= s.com

Subject: = Re: +Chaff

Reply-To: = homeroast= s.com

=

Toss it into the = wind.

On 12/13/06, Al Williams <sweetmarias&= gt; wrote:

What do = you folks do with the chaff?  = Is it alright to spread it in

the garden, or on the lawn?

=

Al

= = --Apple-Mail-1-1012549013--

29) From: Bugtrack505
I pass the beans between two colanders  in front of a running fan.  I
learned the first time that it's only necessary for the colanders and
the beans to be in front of the fan.  I now stand to one side...
Roger
Alison Pfeffer wrote:
<Snip>

30) From: Lynne
Makes a new and interesting hair treatment.
I realized it one day when I noticed chaff was following me everywhere 
in my apartment after I roasted. Finally realized it was coming from my 
hair... I had become "Pigpen" from Charlie Brown.
Lynne
On Dec 15, 2006, at 8:49 AM, Bugtrack505 wrote:
<Snip>

31) From: Michael Rasmussen
Bugtrack505 wrote:
<Snip>
Is that an entry in the make us laugh competition?  :)
-- 
   Michael Rasmussen, Portland, Ore, USA
  Be Appropriate && Follow Your Curiosity
       http://www.patch.com/words/

32) From: Sheila Quinn
LOL - had you gone out anywhere, people would have wondered about your 
brown dandruff! :o
Sheila
Lynne wrote:
<Snip>

33) From: I. David Bornstein
Try a flat winnowing "basket" minimum diameter size 14" but 20" is
better.  Usually available in Asian grocery or gee-gaw stores or arts
& crafts stores.  Using a fan is creative though here in the Rocky
Mountains a little unnecessary.  I thought of stuffing a pillow???
David
On 12/15/06, Sheila Quinn  wrote:
<Snip>

34) From: Lynne
What was so funny (or sad??) was the fact that it actually took me 
awhile to figure it out. Heck, I had my coffee...nothing else 
mattered!?
L.
On Dec 15, 2006, at 1:12 PM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>

35) From: susan oppenheim
i have asked the chaff question for years
what has the most?
Why do some beans have so much more?
we know decaf has none practically-because it has been chemically washed
now that we are  using the behmor and trying to avoid really chaffy
ones......
i am all ears
susan

36) From: Justin Marquez
I believe it has to do with the method of processing the coffee.  "Wet
processed" usually has less chaff than does "dry processed" or "pulped
natural".
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On Nov 20, 2007 5:50 PM, susan oppenheim  wrote:
<Snip>

37) From: C. Herlihy
Justin Marquez  wrote: I believe it has to do with the method of processing the coffee.  "Wet processed" usually has less chaff than does "dry processed" or "pulped natural".
 That's correct. So, most Brazilians, Ethiopians and Yemens would tend to have more chaff. Also, the dry milling at origin can be done cleaner or sloppier depending on how good the milling equipment is and how fussy the miller is. Also, some varieties, like Bourbon, often have tighter cracks down the flat side of the bean which hold a bit of silverskin even when milled carefully.
  Saludos,
 Carlitros
 Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX) 
 On Nov 20, 2007 5:50 PM, susan oppenheim  wrote:
 i have asked the chaff question for years
what has the most?
Why do some beans have so much more?
 
we know decaf has none practically-because it has been chemically washed
now that we are  using the behmor and trying to avoid really chaffy
ones......
i am all ears
susan
 
---------------------------------
Never miss a thing.   Make Yahoo your homepage.

38) From: Ken Knott
So when grinding my latest batches, I'm finding what I appear to be chaff. =
 Apparently I haven't blown it all off or whatever.
Can this effect the flavor?  Is it important to remove all possible chaff b=
efore grinding and brewing?  =
Thanks,
Ken
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39) From:
<Snip>
positive or negative on taste

40) From: Seth Grandeau
does chaff affect espresso (i.e., does it interfere with the regularity of
the grind and how well it tamps down)?
On 3/4/08, isemingerfamily  wrote:
<Snip>
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41) From: Sandy Andina
You're probably encountering what remains in the beans' seams,  
especially in lighter roasts. It's a tradeoff sometimes when roasting  
beans that show their best at no darker than City or City+--do you  
sacrifice some of the character or do you put up with some chaff? At  
any rate, there's a lot less of it than in canned preground coffee.
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 4, 2008, at 1:02 PM, Ken Knott wrote:
<Snip>
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42) From: Rich
The chaff does nothing to the flavor.  This has been covered several 
times in the past and the consensus of the resident experts assembled is 
that it is a "no never mind" item.  A consensus of experts or scientists 
can never be wrong....
No joking - not a problem.
Ken Knott wrote:
<Snip>
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43) From: Rich
what percentage of the dose is chaff?
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<Snip>
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44) From: Ed Needham
Not a resident expert on anything, but I used to grind the beans and then 
blow the chaff off with a hair dryer on 'air' out into the garage, and I 
could always improve the brew by doing that.  If you make a 'chaff tea' it 
does have flavor, and it, to me is objectionable.  I don't do the blower 
routine anymore (I'm not sure why) but I'll go on record as saying I think 
chaff is astringent and papery tasting.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

45) From: Seth Grandeau
I haven't started making espresso yet (though Amazon is promising to ship my
machine at some point).  I have noticed from grinding for coffee that there
is definitely some chaff gound up in there.  I'd say it's small, 1%-ish.
On 3/4/08, Rich  wrote:
<Snip>
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46) From: John Brown
but if there is enugh of it it will change the color of the  grounds to 
a lighter color.
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<Snip>
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47) From: Rich
If there is enough of it to visibly impact the color then it just might 
impact the flavor.  It tends to disappear when mixed into the ground 
coffee and no longer stand out.  I just consider it a non problem and 
move on.
John Brown wrote:
<Snip>
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48) From: Seth Grandeau
My concern was would the consistency of the chaff impact the tamping
pressure or the flow through the puck?
On 3/4/08, Rich  wrote:
<Snip>
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49) From: raymanowen
"...what percentage of the dose is chaff?"
You need to know %volume fraction or %weight fraction?
It would take outstanding laboratory instrumentation and technique to
determine either one. You have a lot of spare time on your hands if you can
make some salient determination from the chaff content, or maybe you wish to
burn it and reuse the energy in your roasting loop.
Such a recirculating afterburner would also reduce the free oxygen in the
stream of roasting fluid gas, thereby improving the overall roast. Neat,
huh? Good idea.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
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50) From: Lynne
Picturing Ed making a chaff tea, and loving the fact that this is
completely normal for our group.
*Yes!!* - I belong here!!
Lynne
Ed Needham  wrote:
If you make a 'chaff tea' it does have flavor, and it, to me
is objectionable.....I'll go on record as saying I think chaff
is astringent and papery tasting.
<Snip>
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51) From: Jerry Procopio
I consider it a non problem in all methods except vac pot brewing with a 
glass rod.  I have had stalls that I believe were caused by the chaff. 
Same grind, darker roast with less chaff, no stall.  Not exactly 
scientific, but I believe there is a correlation there.
my 2˘
Jerry
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52) From: Wally Merrin
Hi...
I'm new to the list and home roasting both.  I'm working my way  
through the SM sample packs that came with my Fresh Roast 8 roaster.   
So far I've had pretty good luck, but I'm having a problem with some  
of the bean types going from first crack to French too quickly.  I  
realize this is a characteristic of the FR-8, but it also seems to be  
a function of how much chaff is caught in the chaff collector blocking  
airflow.  The first couple of types I tried generated lots of chaff  
and I had to shut off the roast quickly to keep from overdoing it.   
Then I tried the Sumatra Gr. 1 Mandheling and there was so much less  
chaff that I way under-roasted because I kept expecting it to burn.
This makes me think that I should pay attention to what types of beans  
are most appropriate for the FR-8.  Are there some general rules of  
thumb correlating chaff production to coffee characteristics?  If I  
wanted to avoid beans which give off a lot of chaff, what would I look  
for?  Or, is the Mandheling unusually low in chaff compared to most  
other beans?
I think I want to roast to a FC or FC+ since I'm not a big fan of  
really dark roasts but it looks like that might take a little juggling  
to do with the FR-8.
Thanks,
Wally
==================
Wally Merrin
wmerrin
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53) From: Bill
Wally, first, welcome to the hobby and welcome to the list!  i hope you
enjoy roasting your own coffee beans.  We all definitely do!!  And hopefully
this list will be a welcome place for you to learn and explore.
I used a freshie for a while before upgrading because of size
considerations.  I never noticed what you are noticing.  Definitely that the
freshie would race through a roast, but never quite as dramatically as you
are describing.
I'm not sure, but I think that the mod to increase fan speed would be useful
to you.  It doesn't decrease the heater, but it blows more heat clear.  Now
it might not work because of the chaff resistance...  so I'm hoping that a
few other listers would join in here with their suggestions as well.
Welcome to the list, and happy roasting!
bill
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54) From: Brian Kamnetz
Wally,
Welcome to the list. Glad to hear that you are enjoying yourself.
I haven't used  a Freshroast, but if I recall correctly it is similar
to hot air poppers. One way to alter roast times is to vary the amount
of greens you are roasting at one time. If your roast is going too
fast, use LESS beans. If your roast is going too slowly, use MORE
beans. Seems counter-intuitive, but it works pretty well.
Brian
On Wed, Sep 24, 2008 at 9:52 PM, Wally Merrin  wrote:
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55) From: Karl Schendel
Wally Merrin wrote:
<Snip>
I have an FR8 as well.  The nice thing about it is that you
are doing small batches, so you can experiment a bit and not
lose half a bag of coffee to a crappy roast.  My wife and I
don't drink a lot of coffee, so the small batch size isn't
a serious problem.  (What we DO drink, we want to be good!)
I dunno about trying to match up beans, but a couple things
you can try.  One is to use (even) smaller batches, since
the small batch won't hold the heat as well and won't produce
as much chaff.  This has worked VERY well for me with some
of the Ethiopia DP and Yemen coffees, which generate lots of
chaff.  I did a half-size DP Koratie the other day that just
absolutely blew our socks off!  Yummmmmmm.
The other thing you can try is to manually twiddle the
timer knob to cycle the FR8 heater on and off.  I've just
started experimenting with this and it works great with
the larger beans.  You could try a few cycles to let the
bean heat up more evenly (roughly 30 seconds on, 5 seconds
off), then let it rip and see how it works.  For the large
beans I keep cycling it until the beans really start to
brown up, then let it roll into first-crack, then cycle
it a few times depending on how deep a roast I want.
I don't know how much cycling abuse the Freshie can take
before the heater switch pukes, but that's OK;  it's
an inexpensive and happy little roaster, and if I kill it
I'll either move up or just buy another.  Or both!  :-)
Karl
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56) From: raymanowen
The Welcome Kiosk is fired up and about to brew some Costa Rica in my Moka
pot. I've been using my Fresh Roast standard model. The batch size allows
for a variety of very fresh roasts.
I get any roasting speed I want with the FR when I switch it to Cool for 5
sec / 30 sec- the timer and roast start at 00:00, turn to Cool at 00:25
until 00:30, back on heat, Cool at 00:55 to 01:00, Heat....
 This heat modulation works fine for me when starting out with 1/3 cup of
green.
It all came together in the Moka pot, 10 minutes ago. It's getting better,
but the trick is to get longer pre-infusion before the flow accelerates.
Can't really brew cooler with a MP that I know.
Cheers, Mabuhay, and Magandang Gabi -RayO, aka Opa!
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57) From: Brian Kamnetz
On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 1:58 AM,   wrote:
the trick is to get longer pre-infusion before the flow accelerates.
<Snip>
Ray,
I was wondering about this. The water is pushed by an increased
pressure caused by the heated water. The question is, how hot does the
water have to be to produce a pressure increase great enough to move
water up through the coffee. My understanding is that water is hottest
at a rolling boil. That sort of implies that water that is less hot
can produce an increase in pressure.... but at this point I'm starting
to tell you 1.5 of what I know....
To summarize, I'm wondering whether allowing the water to get hot
enough only to barely seep (lower pressure, lower temp) brews at a
cooler temperature than would be the case if the brewing proceeds more
quickly (higher pressure, higher temp).
Brian
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58) From: Justin Marquez
Decaf produces almost no chaff.
Most Dry-Processed or "Natural Pulped Processed" beans will produce more
chaff than wet processed beans.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On Wed, Sep 24, 2008 at 8:52 PM, Wally Merrin  wrote:
<Snip>
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59) From: raymanowen
I have measured the water temperature in a tea fettle on an electric surface
element, from the first instant the steam starts to drift out of the tea
kettle on the stove through its whistle, no sound, just see some vapor
movement- (194° F)
Steam vapor actually starts to blow through whistle (199° F)-
Upper temperature limit, steam blowing through whistle under pressure- (201=
°
F).
I haven't measured the Moka pot temperature yet, but the water column is
4.2" to 5.5", in addition to atmospheric pressure. With the grounds loosely
packed under their own weight in the filter, there is no tamp packing
pressure to add to the atmospheric plus water column pressure/ temperature.
The MP can sit on the surface element for about two seconds after the bottom
tank is filled with hot brewing water from the TV carafe. Then we have Old
Faithful. It continues more slowly as I pick it up and hold the pot above
the heat element.
There is more learning and splainin' - just have to do it. It keeps getting
better.
The morning's espresso was fabulous, from the Costa Rica  roast! Who
says there is an Espresso Roast?  "Full of Prunes," or as the old folks used
to say, "Hon seiniau cara chybôl."
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
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60) From: Brian Kamnetz
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61) From: raymanowen
2 or 3 degrees change in brew temperature is certainly worth chasing,
methinks.
Cheers, Mabuhay and Magandang Tanghali -RayO, aka Opa!
On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 12:35 PM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
ve
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
-- =
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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62) From: Brian Kamnetz
On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 3:05 PM,   wrote:
<Snip>
Agreed. I think I get a "sweeter" moka pot brew when I limit the flow
as much as I can without stopping it. Of course, I grind quite finely,
because if I don't I don't think I get as rich a brew, so my grind may
make me a little more susceptible to over-extraction and resulting
bitterness.
Brian
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63) From: Wally Merrin
Thanks to listers for the tips on the Fresh Roast 8.  I tried reducing  
the batch size and it made a huge difference in roast time.  I think I  
have enough tips to keep going with the FR-8 for awhile before moving  
up to a different roaster.  I may look at putting a switch in series  
with the heating element to do the heat/no heat cycles that were  
suggested.  I tend to fumble with the timer knob (it's somewhat stiff)  
so maybe a momentary-open switch would be worthwhile.  Heck, it  
wouldn't be that hard to incorporate a timing mechanism....
Wally
==================
Wally Merrin
wmerrin
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64) From: Donald Varona
Sorry to notice this so late, but...
My suspicion is that the increase in flow rate is not caused by an increased
pressure, but because the flow blockage is reduced as more of the coffee
grounds extract.  I know this happens in espresso, and it's bad when the
flow is increased by channeling; but the grind is not fine enough here to
really channel, I think.  I'll bet the pressure is actually reduced as the
flow rate increases.
I would recommend just lowering the flame more and more throughout the
process to keep it slow.  Probably the best way to follow the temp curve is
to park a thermocouple right at the spout outlet.  Then you could get some
good data and see how temp profiles correspond to flavor.
--dv
On Fri, Sep 26, 2008 at 11:08 AM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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65) From: j3r
Just wondering what people's thoughts on chaff are as far as taste goes. 
I have a bean that when roasted still has significant chaff left on it. 
Is it worth trying to rub it off or will it not affect anything? I have 
read to not worry, but I come here for the expert's opinion :)
Thanks,
Jer
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66) From: Robert Rayburn
No personal experience but all I have read about chaff says it does not affect flavor.
Sent from my iPhone
On Dec 6, 2011, at 3:36 PM, j3r  wrote:
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67) From: Terry McVay \(rr\)
Some make tea out of it as I recall. But I have always thought chaff was so
close to tasteless it didn't matter.
But then if I had any taste I wouldn't roast so far into second crack.. :-]
Terry/Kona

68) From: Janomac
There simply is not enough difference in taste (actually none that I can
tell) to make it worth the effort of total removal.
Over the past few years, that has been the general opinion of this list.
A few folks have taken chaff from their roasting and made a tea (as Terry
from Hawaii mentioned). It is pretty "weak" stuff with little flavor.
Making tea from the pulped coffee cherry (Yemen = Qishr) is altogether
different and produces a mildly acidic, delicate, herbal flavor not unlike
a weak infusion of hibiscus & rosehips.
 I roast light and almost always have some "skin" clinging to the beans
(depends upon the variety). It is evident after grinding and I can blow
much of it out when I grind medium to course (for French Press), but it
just gets all over everything and clings by static charge to everything.
Kirk
"Janomac"
(resident chaffinista)
On Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 4:36 PM, j3r  wrote:
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69) From: michael kaericher
I have found no difference in flavor,  but I do get more spritzes in my espresso shots when there is a lot of chaff.   
-Mike
On Tue, Dec 6, 2011 5:47 PM CST Janomac wrote:
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70) From: Edward Bourgeois
I'm more careful with ET/MET with chaffy coffees as not to singe the
remaining surface chaff/mucilage which can then effect the taste. I'll
cut down the batch size if necessary to maintain the desired time
profile while being able to slightly lower the heat applied.
On Wed, Dec 7, 2011 at 10:27 AM, michael kaericher  wro=
te:
<Snip>
 espresso shots when there is a lot of chaff.
<Snip>
. I
<Snip>
s it
<Snip>
to
<Snip>
ee.com>
<Snip>
.**
<Snip>
fo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.com>
<Snip>
riascoffee.com/forum/>
<Snip>
com/library>">Our
<Snip>
mariascoffee.com
<Snip>
a>
<Snip>
mariascoffee.com
<Snip>
a>
<Snip>
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71) From: Seth Grandeau
The only concerns I've had with chaff is too be careful when roasting a
"chaffy" coffee, to avoid a chaff fire.  I've had two and they are smokey
messes.  Chaff can also clog a vacuum pot, if you're using the glass filter
rod.
On Wed, Dec 7, 2011 at 11:38 AM, Edward Bourgeois wrote:
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72) From: Raybob Bowman
I'm relatively new to roasting <1 yr, roasting in drilled pan in oven 
480 @ 13-14 min., homemade shroud over oven when smoke stage. Of course, 
there is chaff everywhere unless I take outside, remove with two 
strainers.  Recently, I've just been leaving the chaff with the beans 
and don't think I notice a difference in taste.  Am I doing something wrong?
Raybob
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73) From: Edward C Rasmussen
Compared to the flavors of the coffee bean itself, I don't think chaff itself would add or subtract much flavor from the cup.  My greater concern would be with the brewing method.
If you're brewing by French press or "cowboy coffee" where the grounds are just steeped and then the coffee decanted off, I don't think it would make much difference.  But if you are brewing by some sort of filter method, then I would think the chaff might clog the filter more rapidly and slow the passage of water through the grounds and change the resulting flavor of the coffee, either for good or for bad.  
If your coffee still tastes OK then it's probably not a problem.  If there's much chaff left on my roasted beans it seems to show up with static electricity when grinding.  Like you, I usually take a couple of strainers out into the back yard to get as much of the remaining chaff off the beans as possible just because it's less messy when grinding.  
Ed

74) From: Brian Kamnetz
I can't recall who it was, might have been Alchemist John, but someone
experimented with chaff a few years back and reported that chaff did not
affect the flavor of coffee. So as long as it doesn't clog up your
extraction, there shold be no problem.
You might want to consider getting a heat gun (e.g., $25 Wagner or
Milwaukee) and roast half a pound at a time, outside, or in a porch, shed,
etc. You have a bit more control of the temps than you would in the oven,
by raising or lowering the heat gun.
Brian
On Sat, Jul 13, 2013 at 6:24 AM, Raybob Bowman  wrote:
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75) From: Raybob Bowman
Thanks.  I started roasting with the heat gun.  Great for consistency in 
the roast, compared to oven, but very dependent on weather outside.  
Does blow chaff away as you roast which was a good thing.  May go back 
to that for rest of summer.  With oven roasting, if I don't blow it, 
just pour from pan to jars, I'm not really having any problems at all 
with chaff, just keeping it in the jars with the beans.  Another factor 
is the 1500watts/13 minutes cost much more than the propane for my oven 
@ $1.65 per gallon delivered.
Raybob
On 7/14/2013 10:00 AM, homeroast-request wrote:
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76) From: gin powell
you are roasting in your home oven?
I would be much more concerned about a fire in the oven then a taste change
in the coffee itself.
got any pictures of your oven setup?
ginny...
On Sun, Jul 14, 2013 at 10:49 AM, Raybob Bowman wrote:
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