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Topic: New Freshroast needs a WAV (10 msgs / 242 lines)
1) From: R.N.Kyle
Hey Ken, The FR roasts so fast that often the loud 1st crack, and 2nd =
crack run together, and the 2nd starts as the 1st is ending or slightly =
before. the 2nd crack sounds similar to crinkling cellophane.
Try going to cool for  a few seconds several times to slow the roast =
down, do this after you hear the first crack starts.
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

2) From: Kenneth Rhynas
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi guys,
   After reading the list for the better part of a year, I figured that =
I had better start roasting some coffee. I purchased a Freshroast from =
Tom in December along with his sample selection.I seem to be getting =
some nice roasts from it , but I must admit I haven't a clue what I'm =
doing. Like so many new roasters, I too am having trouble telling the =
"cracks" apart. I have been roasting Toms Costa Rican Auction =
Lot-Diamante Tarrazu. Today I decided to roast as dark as the machine =
would go so that I could hear the whole profile. I don't seem to hear a =
clear point when the first crack stops. It starts slowly with single =
cracks, which gradually become more frequent and a bit loader. Then an =
occasional load pop, and finally toward the end of the roast, very rapid =
,but soft pops. One sound never really ends, they just seem to meld =
together. I wonder if one of you guys has ever recorded the sound of =
roasting coffee, and if it would be possible to post it on the net along =
with commentary?. Just a thought.
Ken R.

3) From: Lee XOC
< [mailto:homeroast-admin]On Behalf Of R.N.Kyle
< Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 9:27 PM
<
< Try going to cool for  a few seconds several times to slow
< the roast down, do this after you hear the first crack starts.
::raising hand::   I have a question!
Reading now several pieces of advice on intermittently going to a
cooling cycle to lengthen roast time, I am confused on what exactly is
meant by a "stalled roast".
Is a stalled roast a temporary thing, recoverable by continuing the
roasting process, or a permanent thing where the beans wind up ruined
and it's necessary to start from scratch?  I was under the impression
that it was the latter case, but now I think I've been mistaken.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
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4) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Lee XOC" 
<Snip>
IIRC, a stalled roast is a situation where your roast hits a peak temp and
can go no further. Example would be oven roasting with temp set at 400f,
the roast would 'stall' at 400f no matter how long you left it in (don't
bring up the 'endo/exo'!).
The purpose of briefly switching to cooling cycle is to slow the temp' rise,
not eliminate it.
MM;-) aka Kona Krazy miKe mcKoffee
Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
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5) From: Lee XOC
< On Behalf Of Mike McGinness
< Sent: Friday, January 03, 2003 11:10 AM
<
< IIRC, a stalled roast is a situation where your roast hits a
< peak temp and
< can go no further. Example would be oven roasting with temp
< set at 400f,
< the roast would 'stall' at 400f no matter how long you left
< it in (don't bring up the 'endo/exo'!).
I'm not sure I understand about hitting a peak temp and not being able
to go further.  What normally happens during roasting?  Do the beans
normally have a constantly increasing temperature from start until
cooling cycle?  Also, what causes the brick wall in thermal increase -
insufficient ambient roasting temperature?  I guess I don't know the
what the bean temperature is supposed to be at first or second crack.
Hmm I am getting more confused the more I get into this, but I think a
major learning spurt will be the result with a little help.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
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6) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Lee XOC  wrote:
<Snip>
 The way I see it, Lee,  a stalled roast happens when heating
stops long enough for bean temps to actually fall when they
should continue rising untill done. It takes so much heat to
bring the beans back up to roasting temp that they tend to get
damaged in the process. The roast tends to turn out badly. Heavy
charring of the outside of the bean giving a bitter, burnt
taste, sometimes a flat and baked flavor. There seems to be a
better chance of turning out something drinkable by starting
them over after a cooling period. At least that's been the
experiance that some have had "double roasting".
 Reducing the heat while roasting, usually to stretch out the
time between cracks, or to let second crack be a gentle one to
finish, involves carefully lowering the roaster temp just enough
when needed. That tends to mute acidity and increase body and
complexity and for me, digestability of the roasted coffee.
BTW, I must have missed something-what's a WAV?
Charlie
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7) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
A stalled roast usually occurs in underpowered poppers or when roasting in
cold weather. There is not enough heat to reach second crack in a reasonable
time, say 12 minutes. This is different from a slowed roast in that the heat
in a properly designed machine can be raised after some time to reach second
(or close to second) and properly finish the roast.
There are two methods to slowing a roast. You can switch to cooling for
several seconds with the fan on, once or several times. You can also turn
off both the heat and fan for a longer time, one half to one minute, then
resume. I sometimes use the heat off/fan off method later in the profile
then start cooling to finish the roast.
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8) From: Ed Needham
I had a Melitta Aromaroast that was teetering on the edge of not getting hot
enough to fully roast the beans through second crack.  They also had a rather
anemic first crack.  any times the beans tasted like crap and were hard as
rocks, no matter how long I roasted them.  Sure, they would change color, and
even get dark brown, but they would not throw off much chaff, and were
'baked'.  Not sure anything could save them at that point.
With some mods, I was able to eek out more temperature and get decent roasts,
but it was hit and miss as to how well the roast would turn out.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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9) From: Ben Treichel
its a .wav, and its a sound file your computer can play. However, I 
believe that this is a 'no attachments' list.
Ben
Oaxaca Charlie wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Ben Treichel  wrote:
<Snip>
 Thanks, Ben. I learn something new every day on this list.
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