HomeRoast Digest


Topic: careening into roasting drums (35 msgs / 1396 lines)
1) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 My drum, with 5 lbs of beans only weighs about 10 lbs. I wear
out welders gloves every couple of months, and have a few burn
scars-one on my arm is a "brand" that matches the ss mesh.You
had better come up with something to lift and dump a super hot
25 lbs drum. Dropping it could hurt more than just your roast.
Back strain seems inevitable, too. You'll need some kind of
lift, and I can only imagine some kind of crane type thing out
side of the BBQ. Quite the project you have going there. ;o)
Charlie
--- floyd burton  wrote:
<Snip>
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: floyd burton
Hmm a crane for a 25# drum-don't think so.  But still am looking for a way
to handle the hot drum-guess a crane would solve that.  Have access to a
engine puller/crane-will try to do something else-maybe a cradle to sit it
on while dumping the beans into the cooler.

3) From: Ed Needham
Home Depot has welders gloves.  I probably ought to get some myself, but the
plain leather work gloves have worked well so far.  The drum I built is quite
a bit lighter than Butch's.  Lifting it with a 5 pound load weighs probably
10 pounds.
Received my new rotisserie motor today.  Gawd!  It looks like a winch for a
4x4.  I don't think I'll have any problems turning the drum with it .
I hope it's quiet.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

4) From: Tom & Maria
Anyone have any pictures online of your homemade drum roasters? Love 
to see them...  Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
		1455 64th Street Emeryville CA 94608
                      http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.sweetmarias.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: jim gundlach
Tom,
      I have an old page that shows the construction of my first one.  I  
have built another that has a door for putting beans in and taking them  
out.  The page ends with the story about a dead motor.  I replaced the  
motor and it roasted fine.  I have since passed this one on to another  
list member as a step in the tradition exchange that we have going on  
the list.  Also, it is a year old, Tori is now four and the floor 162.
go to:  http://www.auburn.edu/~gundljh/BBQ.htmlJim Gundlach
roasting over pecan wood fire
On Wednesday, January 8, 2003, at 06:27 PM, Tom & Maria wrote:
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 Sheesh, Tom, if you'd just read the list postings more often
you'd already have checked out www.homeroaster.com  I have to
admit, though,-Jim Gundlach's is the nicest looking drum
yet.Simple, yet so elegant-no?
Charlie
--- Tom & Maria  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

7) From: floyd burton
Mine's bigger

8) From: Ed Needham
By latest drum roaster will get pics taken as soon as I can get the new motor
hooked up.  Probably this weekend.  Hopefully I can toss together a bit of
HTML and get it on my web page too. I think Butch's roaster will be finished
shortly too.  That's probably where he is tonight...drilling holes, and more
holes, and even more holes, and making trips to Sears for more titanium bits
.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

9) From: Ed Needham
Jim...
You want me to post a link to your page along with the other homebuilt
roasters on homeroaster.com?
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

10) From: jim gundlach
On Wednesday, January 8, 2003, at 10:24 PM, Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>
Ed,
    Sure,   I'll update it sooner or later but It will still have the 
same URL.
        Jim
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

11) From: Ed Needham
Done.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.com
ed
****************************************
**********************************************

12) From: floyd burton
Ed-u must be really connected-did dull a titanium bit on that SS bowl but
will wait till the weekend and get another one at Menards or Fleet
Farm-better prices.  Hope to get the motor today and hook it up tonight.
Have you put together a time/temp roasting profile for a gas grill roaster?
Think I have got a learning curve-am going to get at least 10# of cheap
beans to start with.  Will provide digital pics of the beast when I get my
digicam.

13) From: Tom & Maria
Thanks Jim - I forgot I had read your page and Ed's too -it's the 
haze of long, long holiday rush work days finally lifting. I am going 
to try to find the McMasters-Carr folks. That perforated sheet would 
be really handy to have around! Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
		1455 64th Street Emeryville CA 94608
                      http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.sweetmarias.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: Ed Needham
I'm not sure any profile on another roaster would help you much unless you
can actually get a good representation of the bean temp itself.  Then you
could roast by profiles that are linked to chemical processes inside the
bean.
The temp readings I get are so weird that they don't make sense to me,
although I get a good roast.  All I know is that the roasts come out fine
when readings on my 550F dial thermometer are in the 500F to 525F range for a
large part of the roast.  I think the measurement is skewed somehow, but I
can't figure it out.  I'm looking for another, longer thermometer for
positional comparison.
I usually blast full power at first to compensate for opening the lid and
losing much of the heat. As the temperature starts to climb, I am looking for
it to peak (500F) near the beginning of first crack. At first crack, I reduce
the heat so it stops climbing, and let it stay at 500F (reducing heat along
the way to achieve this) until I hear second crack start.  I cut it back to
low at that point and sometimes even turn the burners off.  There is plenty
of heat and momentum at that point that second crack is sustained.  Works for
me.  Not sure my results are applicable to anything but my roaster.  I'm
trying to find more believable temperature results.
By the way, using the larger drum and 30 RPM motor, a two pound load and the
temp cranked all the way up for the first roast baseline, the entire roast
ended in 12:15 instead of the 20+ minutes using my first BBQ drum roaster.
Of course the first roast was (for the most part) tossed as a sacrifice to
the roaster gods (OK...I brewed some of it, so sue me).  It was not that
great.  Although impaired by a motor that couldn't turn the drum and had to
be hand turned for much of the roast, the second 2 1/2 pound roast was great.
I slowed it down and it finished at 19:15.  Very smooth and drinkable Panama
Organic Aifu.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

15) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Ed Needham" 
 I slowed it down and it finished at
19:15.  Very smooth and drinkable Panama
<Snip>
Hey Ed, which Panama is that again? Did you mean Timor Organic Aifu?
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

16) From: floyd burton
I am making the following assumptions-you load the drum with green beans
into the roaster and then hit the burners and take it up to 500F.  I assume
this takes some time so that you hit 500 say in 10 minutes or so.  Then you
back off the heat a bit and then when you hear second crack start-cut off
the heat and hopefully this is around 18 to 20 minutes.  From my limited
experience at watching the big boys roast-that time frame appears about
right.
Oh got the vanes in the drum-am having to find another larger pulley to
transmit the power from the shaft to the drum-will basicaly drill holes in
the pulley and have it anchored to the end of the drum and inside the drum
have a heavier piece of steel strapping that intersects with the 1.5" angle
iron vanes.  The beast is getting heavier-may start looking for a lift-:)
such fun-motor should arrive tomorrow-assume it is a CW not CCW motor.

17) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 Hi, it's me not Ed-but he'll respond soon enough. I was going
to reply to his post anyway and mention the similar profile I
tend to use with my system. Start pretty warm, let the roaster
(oven in my case) get it's hottest near the beggining of first
crack, let off on the heat-beans continue to get warmer
anyway-just let them slowly keep getting warmer till second
crack starts, then really lower the roaster temp and let the
roast cruise to where I want it. The thermal mass in lbs of
beans is something very different than batches under a lb or 2.
I also have crazy oven temps showing by any method of
measurement, but 500-525 degrees show up a lot as the best temp
to get the beans cracking, with 460 or so,and falling, near the
end. I can measure the bean temp with an infared thermometer,
and do, but it involves pulling the drum out of the oven so I do
that less and less as I pretty much know what it'll tell me now
after lots of practice. Ed will probably tell you to pre heat
the roaster and shut the lid quick-in fact that's what I think
he already said in his post.
 What's this about attatching a pulley to the drum? A chain
drive inside the roaster? You have to get us some pics soon.
Soons like quite the contraption, your beast.
Charlie
--- floyd burton  wrote:
<Snip>
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

18) From: floyd burton
Thanks for the info-yeah I careen into almost everything I do-kinda the
story of my life.  My grill has 3 burners which deliver @ 45K btu and I hope
that will let me start with the roaster cool and have the beans in the drum
when I start the burners.  If it is necessary to start with the roaster
fairly warm-I can do that but would be vastly simpler to start cold-temp is
to remain below freezing for the next couple of weeks-so cold it will be.  I
also see you confirm what Ed said-really pull back on the heat when the
first crack starts as the roast starts to take off - I only have a
thermometer that is just above the roasting drum inside the grill-tested it
with boiling water and it is right on at least at that temp.
The drum is looking kinda cool actually.  Will get pics posted of the beast
when get it finished.
thanks again

19) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 I guess that with all that power you can get the heat high
enough to reach 3d crack in just minutes from a cold start. ;o)
You didn't expain why you're putting a pully on the drum. That
actually implies a belt, no? Can't be, I'll just wait for the
pics. Oh, you might want to stock up on thermometers. Anything I
leave exposed to roasting temps dies before too long, usually.
Charlie
--- floyd burton  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

20) From: dewardh
Charlie:
<Snip>
measurement, but 500-525 degrees show up a lot as the best temp
to get the beans cracking, with 460 or so,and falling, near the
end.
Those numbers are not at all far from the air temperatures in a hot air 
roaster, and what you're doing to "profile" the roast is much the same, too . . 
.. particularly the part about reducing roaster  temperature (heat input to the 
beans) toward the end of the roast to keep it from "running away",  At the 
start of the roast a whole lot of energy is going in to drying the beans . . . 
that's what keeps bean temperature down despite the high roast air temperature. 
 Once the beans are dry pretty much all the heat they absorb goes into raising 
their temperature, and if the roaster/roast air remains a lot hotter than the 
beans they will heat up real fast (even worse when they start releasing energy 
themselves),  That's when you lower the heat input to the roaster (or lower 
roast air temperature in an air roaster) to slow the rise in bean temperature 
and extend the ramp into second crack.
Because of the differences in heat transfer between a big batch in a drum and a 
little batch floating in air there will be differences in how you adjust the 
roaster . . . but I think we're all looking to gain the same control over the 
actual "temperature over time" state of the beans, with the intent of producing 
similar roast curves.  I hope it's not too long before we can start getting, 
and comparing, reasonably accurate measurements of bean temperature *during the 
roast* so we can adjust our various machines to produce the same roast 
"profiles" regardless of batch size or roaster type.  It'll move the "drum vs. 
air" argument to a whole new level  . . . (and demonstrate, once and for all 
I believe, that home roasters can match anything done in the bigger 
"commercial" roasters).
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

21) From: Mike McGinness
From: "dewardh" 
  (and demonstrate, once and for all
<Snip>
I'd go so far as to say home roasters can (not saying always do:-) but can
surpass, not just match, the final product as a whole. We can afford to be
pickier about our greens without concern about the cost versus what someone
else will pay for the final roasted product. Our only concern is the result
of the final product! (speaking for myself anyway:-)
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

22) From: Ed Needham
Ummm...Panama Boquete -La Berlina
How do you say 'brain fart'.  I have no idea how I attributed Aifu to Panama.
Might make a nice blend though.  Very different coffees.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

23) From: dewardh
Charlie:
<Snip>
leave exposed to roasting temps dies before too long, usually.
The "gold standard" for reliable temperature measurement is the Platinum RTD . 
.. . properly installed they have a half life of about forever (unlike 
thermocouples, of which one always keeps a couple of spares).  Once you factor 
in the cost of the thermowell, and installation time, and replacement costs for 
the failed "other" devices, they aren't much, if any, more expensive . . . and 
the electronics to read them costs more only because thermocouple devices are 
so much more common.  I've got some RTD probes running in some pretty nasty 
places, including several where the probe has outlasted a couple changes of the 
electronics reading it.
But you should get years out of a properly installed thermocouple, too . . . 
more than good enough for roasting, where you don't have to shut down half the 
plant for one failed thermometer anyway  (and nothing goes boom if it fails 
during a roast).
Half the problem with mechanical thermometers is that they fail regularly . . . 
the other half is that you have to stick your head in the fire to read them 
.
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

24) From: Ed Needham
FULL burners on until the empty grill temps are about 550F.  Open the lid
quickly and attach the drum inside the hot grill, start the rotisserie and
close the lid.  Watch the thermometer plummet to 400F due to heat loss and
heat being sucked up by the beans and drum.  Full burners until the heat
starts to steadily rise again, then throttle back to control the rise.  Bring
it up to 500F and keep it there.  It may be necessary to reduce heat
frequently to keep the temp steady at 500F.  Remember it's the beans that
have to ramp up, not necessarily the roaster temps.  As the beans heat up to
the core, they are less able to absorb as much heat, and therefore there will
be less need for aggressive heat near first crack.  Baby-sit that
thermometer, because it can make unexpected jumps at different stages of the
roast. Keep the temps stable through first crack and on toward second.  I
sometimes bump the heat up a bit if the first crack is not very aggressive.
I 'think' it helps the complexity to get a vigorous crack, without raising
the bean temp too high.  Near second, reduce heat to low and let it glide
into second crack.

25) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 17:57 1/9/03, Ed Needham typed:
<Snip>
How long is the one you are using right now?  Is it the standard 5"  If you 
do find a longer probe dial thermometer, please post.
I am trying to find an 8"-10" one but am having no luck.   I wish there was 
a reasonable way to extend the probe on a 5" one from SM.
<Snip>
Where are you taking the temperature.  Outside the drum from the top or 
inside from the side?
   Very smooth and drinkable Panama
<Snip>
Where did you find that, I have only seen Timor Organic Aifu :-)
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

26) From: Ed Needham
I drilled a hole in the front of the grill body at the same height as the
coffee and inserted the probe about 3 " there, making sure the head of the
thermometer was about 2" away from the grill body.  I placed a solid 6"x6"
ceramic tile under the thermometer to keep the direct heat from affecting the
temp readings.
As to the longer thermometer, I've seen 'turkey thermometers that are about a
foot long and read up to 550F or higher.  Now all I have to do is remember
where I saw them.
Panama / Aifu might make a good blend, but I have absolutely no idea where
that reference came from.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

27) From: Ben Treichel
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
I saw them at Wal Mart yesterday.
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

28) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- dewardh  wrote:
<Snip>
 Thanks, Deward, I saved that message with a flag on it. Next
big step in modernizing the brick oven roaster will be
thermostaticaly controlled vents and that'll be the thermometer
in charge. The one thermocoupler I tried (cheap one) lasted all
of one minute. Common oven thermometers last between a week and
2 months and no two have ever shown the same temp at the same
time after they get good and hot. After years of bread baking
and coffe roasting I can tell the temp pretty close by sticking
my hand in there (breifly!) but if I ever have to leave for a
while, go to coffee farms, heck go anywhere, and such, no one
else can take over the roasting and a lot of addicts, oops, I
mean connoiseurs around here get very grumpy drinking stale
coffee till I get back. Now-who sells the Platinum RTD?
Charlie
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

29) From: floyd burton
I am going to put a pulley on the motor end of the shaft to hang the hot
drum when I open the flap door on the other end to pour out the beans.
Pulley's are cheap-get an open one and hopefully it won't get too hot for my
welder's gloves.  Also may use a pulley to transmit power from the shaft by
placing the power transmittal pulley next to the end of the drum and also on
the inside add a 1" x 1/8" flat bar which intersects with a vane on either
end-the vanes are angle irons 1.25" on a side.  Uh it is getting heavier as
I add stuff.  No matter I can bench press a lot-just when it is sizzling
temps may make it interesting.  Got a bunch of input from alt coffee on temp
profiles-seems I must pre heat the drum to 225/250 before adding beans-the
flap door on the end makes adding beans a cinch.  One guy suggested I should
make the drum smaller by adding a compartment to roast 1# batches.  If there
are real problems with roasting 1# batches in a 10" dia by 23" drum-will
make another drum-say 10" dia by 12" long for smaller batches.  Looks like
my kitchen will continue to resemble an iron mongers roost for a while.
This time will make the drum from 16 gauge pre dilled sheet CR steel.
Getting this thing down-CR steel really works very nicely-can't tell u how
much of a pita SS is to work with.  Tough stuff.
thanks for all the input OC.

30) From: floyd burton
Just curious-how do you install a thermocouple or anything else in a
rotating drum.  Is there something that can record temps of an object say
12" away-my grill has a open slots on both ends-if I were to modify the drum
so that the drum shaft was suspended by a couple of straps say 8" inside the
drum-then one of those devices that measure temp at a distance could be
mounted on to the end of the grill.  IF this device exists-names/models and
anything else would be appreciated.  Hmm betcha Barry has a couple on his
roaster.

31) From: dewardh
Charlie:
<Snip>
Thermocouples are relatively fragile, both mechanically (cracks from unequal 
expansion of the two junction metals, which are also brittle) and "chemically" 
(they tend to oxidize easily, and corrode at the junction) . . . except where 
very fast response is needed they should always be protected in a thermowell of 
some sort.  That's not as hard as it sounds . . . the inexpensive ($5-10) bead 
probes that come with the inexpensive "K" junction thermometers fit snugly in 
1/8" SS tubing (available at most hardware stores and hobby shops).  With a 
little heat sink compound in the end of a crimped tube they should function in 
a roast environment for years (for temperatures over 500F I'd cut off the 
heat-shrink that's there only to prevent the otherwise unprotected lead 
insulation from fraying).  Still, RTDs are better . . .
<Snip>
Omega is the "one stop shopping" source for almost any control device you might 
want . . . not necessarily the place to buy, but the place to see what's 
available (then you go looking for the inexpensive alternative ).  They're 
like Grainger and MacMaster combined for process controls.  I asked for their 
general catalog (about 15-20 years ago) and what came (UPS) was 6 telephone 
book sized volumes . . . must have weighed over 30 lbs.  After that you request 
the detailed data sheets .  There are some real advantages to the web . . .http://www.omega.com/Deward
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroasthomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroasthomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

32) From: dewardh
Floyd:
<Snip>
rotating drum.
Not easily . . . it's something that has to be provided for in the initial 
design of the drum mount.  At one end or the other the drum bearing has to be 
moved onto or into the drum so that there can be a stationary shaft (or 
surface).  In the PRO1500, for example, the drum is supported in a cradle, not 
on a shaft (like in the Alpenrost), so the entire back wall is stationary and 
can mount whatever sensors you want on it.  You still have to allow clearances 
for mixing vanes and other "moving parts" . . .
On a "rotisserie drum" it would be easiest (I think) to make the shaft on the 
non-drive end hollow (and stationary), and run it into a bushing on the drum 
end (no continuous shaft through the drum).  I'd then support the drum ends in 
a yoke (which would make it very easy to lift and move with a single-point 
hoist if you "picked" it yoke and all, or to lift the drum off the yoke if it  
 rested on "J" hooks).  It's more complicated mechanically than a simple 
shaft, but has some real advantages in addition to getting wires into the drum 
.
<Snip>
We'd all like to find an IR thermometer that can stand the heat, or an IR 
window material that would let us "stand off" the sensor . . .
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

33) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- floyd burton  wrote:
<Snip>
 The pro ones seem to be like the front loading washing machines
in the laundrymats-the front, where the door is, doesn't move,
just the drum inside. The probes must go in through the front.
Not an option in our cases.
 >Is there something that can record temps of an
<Snip>
 An infared thermometer. I got one at Napa for about $100. That
can read the temp of your drum from there-not the same as bean
temp. Deward no doubt knows how to find a really good one. Mine
is not supposed to get too close to high heat,even though it
needs to be close to focus in. So I do very quick readings with
it. I would not attatch it to the side of a hot grill.  My
basket is generally hotter than the beans untill near the end of
the roast when it's cooler. You'll probably have to experement
by  trial and error for a while till you see what the
differences, if any, are between your drum temp and bean temp. A
solid steel drum would be something Barry'd have better info on
.. SS mesh heats up and cools down quickly. I like that about it.
Charlie
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

34) From: Ed Needham
I wish there was a little 'bean sized' radio transmitter temp sensor that I
could suspend within my drum.  Maybe in a few years stuff like that will be
available to common people.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************

35) From: Ed Needham
I think maybe a metal pocket mounted under one end of the shaft so that you
could unfasten the other end and tip it up with the end of the shaft resting
in the pocket and dump the beans into a cooling bowl.  Mine is not as heavy
as yours, so taking the whole thing out and dumping the beans by hand is not
really a problem.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
****************************************
**********************************************


HomeRoast Digest