HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Report from the roasting front (69 lines)
1) From: Lee XOC
Just back from the front lines of roasting ... my kitchen ... where I
spent the last 4 hours or so charting new territory in several ways ...
1) Assembled my own version of the vacuum + plastic container + screen
"bean cooler/cleaner" and it worked GREAT!  Cooled down a FR+ batch of
beans from very warm fresh from the final cooling cycle to room temp in
1 minute flat.  I used my new cordless Shark as the vacuum, a
shallow/wide 4-quart pail from Home Depot as the plastic bucket, and 2
layers of hardware netting (also from HD) with a square mesh of 1/4"
superimposed at 45 degrees to each other as the screen.  Lots of duct
tape around the edges of the screen to protect from sharp edges of cut
netting and hold the 2 layers together.
2) Roasted some of the newer arrivals - Bolivian, Papua New Guinean, and
Javanese.
3) Did some more manually lengthened roasts.  Inspired by a comment
yesterday from Jim Gundlach,  I aimed to lengthen the time from start of
roast until start of C1, then minimal time in C1, then lengthened time
between C1 and C2.
I fell into a repeatable technique I have high hopes for (but won't know
the results of until the next few days as I taste what I roasted).  The
technique is to create as perfectly even a batch of beans *going into
C1* as possible by moving the roast into a cooling cycle after every
visually perceptible color change occurring in the early stages of the
roast.
So first, the beans obviously start out green, and the first perceptible
change is when some of them start getting tinged to yellow - at that
point I move to a cooling cycle for 1 minute.  Then back to roasting,
until the batch was a fairly even yellow, then another 1 min. cooldown,
then roast until some beans start to tinge brownish, 1 min cooldown,
then roast until entire batch is fairly evenly light brown, another 1
min cooldown, then roast to and through C1, then a 2 minute cooldown,
and then roast until desired end of roast is achieved.
One interesting observation I made was that that this method of
evening-out the roast going into C1 necessarily minimizes the length of
C1 because the batch is very close to being perfectly evenly heated
going into it.  Therefore all the beans are very close to being at the
same verge of popping all at the same time.  The effect was especially
dramatic with the Bolivian, which approached C1 silently, then went into
it like a batch of fireworks, then fell silent again shortly thereafter.
I only documented one example roast (and vaguely at that), a batch of
Kii I roasted to FC.  This should give you an idea of just how long I am
drawing out these roasts:
 - minute 35: start
 - (4 cool-downs cycles as described above - timings not noted)
 - minute 47: start of C1
 - minute 48: end of C1, start 2 minute cooldown
 - minute 53 start of C2
 - minute 54 final cooldown and shutdown
Elapsed time: 19 minutes.  That's right, a 19 minute roast in a FR+! :)
I will report the results as I am able ... I do have high expectations.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lee / San Diego
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