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Topic: veering into drum materials (was: careening into roasting drums) (3 msgs / 115 lines)
1) From: Ed Needham
I drill and cut stainless frequently, and most of it is workable, although
tougher than softer metals.  I would not take on a project where I had to
drill hundreds of holes in stainless.  That would be a lifetime project, but
every roaster I've made has involved drilling at least 25 to 30 holes of
various sizes.  I usually only mess up when I try to take shortcuts, or get
in a hurry.  Sharp bits and a hand drill can poke through 18 gauge in less
than a minute.  Occasionally I encounter some 'diamond/titanium' alloy
stainless left over from that UFO crash that totally defies drilling.  That's
where I break bits and get a bad attitude.
My tools to work stainless include a Makita hand drill, an inexpensive drill
press, a bench grinder, and a Dremel tool with an assortment of reinforced,
heavy duty cutoff wheels and grinding stones. I also use a set of files and a
sharpening stone to smooth the rough edges.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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2) From: floyd burton
John I am not a engineer but have seen very little sheet metal that does not
have some kind of coating on it.  Would think a few seasoning test runs of
temps to 550 would get rid of most coatings except for heavy galvanized.  If
u see rust-then it is probably not coated.

3) From: Ed Needham
They design those things for furnace and flue piping, and are not too
concerned about whether it is poison if you lick it or eat it.
Galvanized metals put off fumes at roasting temperatures which are toxic.  If
it is some sort of sprayed on coating, that would be a concern for me as it
would slowly erode and allow residue to get on my beans.  It's just a big
unknown.  My guess is that it is some sort of dipped coating.  I vaguely
remember getting 'black' on my fingers after handling the stuff at a hardware
store.  That would not be good for beans.
I think it would be wise to err on the safe side when it comes to stuff you
feed your family and friends, as well as yourself.  Sticking with stainless,
aluminum or rolled steel would be safe choices in my opinion.  I am partial
to stainless for food contact though, and long lasting cleanability and
durability.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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