HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Fast cooling (19 msgs / 941 lines)
1) From: Mike McGinness
I failed to mention I monitored the cooling temp' on one of this mornings
roasts with boosted fan. From 440f down to 230f in 1min, 160f in 2min,
down around 120f or lower 3min. (thermometer only reads down to 140...) Of
course, it was 35f ambient which I'm sure attributed to the fast cooling!
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: floyd burton
Thanks for the info-saw a pic of Ed's cooling system and gave me an idea-why
not build a frame using 2"x4" the same size as the window box fan, put
screen wire on one side-reinforce it with several stripes of metal pipe
strapping material and then put the box fan down flat on a couple of 2" x 2"
so it can pull air from the bottom-slap the box with screen wire on the
bottom-crank her up-pour in the beans-spread them out and in the the frigid
temps of winter-betcha beans cool down pronto-here I have a couple of these
things and went out and bought a thru the wall vent fan-course I can control
the chaff with the vent fan and it will go all over with the box fan
arrangement.

3) From: Dan Bollinger
Ed, Sounds like it would work great.  Be sure and move the beans around with
a spatula, there is almost no air flow at the corners or center.  Dan

4) From: Mike McGinness
From: "floyd burton" 
<Snip>
idea-why
<Snip>
2"
<Snip>
frigid
<Snip>
these
<Snip>
control
<Snip>
Totally not necessary with the Rosto. With over 200f drop first minute,
under 120f in three minutes cooling is fine. To me anyway.
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: Ed Needham
My box fan serves dual purpose on hot days by keeping the beans cool and
keeping me and my three Golden Retrievers in a breeze.  (They usually roast
with me)
I've thought of ways to mount brackets on the box fan so I can use it both
ways easier than resting it precariously on a deck chair.  Two 16"x16"x16" U
shapes, or maybe the old frame from a cheap metal/vinyl kitchen chair with
the back cut off, fastened to one side of the box fan would allow it to blow
horizontally as a fan, or vertically as a much more stable bean cooler.
For 5 pound loads, I had to come up with more aggressive cooling than a box
fan.  I'm now using the 'cooling half' of my 2 pound air roaster.  I've
rigged it so the intake air for the blower is sucked through a 6" pipe, which
has the bottom half of a 14" round 'cheapie' Big Lots charcoal grill sitting
on top of it.  It's a porcelain bowl with a 6" hole cut in the bottom.  I
covered the hole with perfed metal and voila!  A bean cooler!  I think the
grill bowl is a very workable idea.  I stir the beans around aggressively at
first and within a minute, they are just barely warm.  Chaff is sucked
through the perfed metal and is caught by a second layer of perfed metal
which I remove to clean off the chaff.  The entire grill was $12.  You've
seen them I'm sure.  K Mart, Target, closeout stores, Walgreen's.  I've seen
them at all of them at one time or another.
I'm tinkering with an idea to use one of my spare rotisserie motors to turn
an automatic agitator, possibly from above.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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6) From: Ed Needham
I shake the colander in a motion to turn the beans over and over until they
are just barely warm.  Chaff looks like brown snow.  Everywhere.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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7) From: floyd burton
Ed are u saying a box fan with a screen covered square placed over the fan
in a horizontal position will not cool 5# of beans-now u are using one but i
thought that big sucker would cool 5# of beans easily.  With a screen area
that large the beans must not be very deep.  Have to to build that rube
goldberg and see how it works.

8) From: Ed Needham
The fan probably would move enough air, but finding a large enough screened
colander and shaking 5 pounds of beans didn't sound like fun.  Oh, and the
chaff...it's bad with one pound...five pounds?  I think it'd make a really
funny video.
Your idea sounds like it would work really well though.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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9) From: Oaxaca Charlie
A box fan blowing over a 2'by 2' mat(beans dumped and spread
out) , with about 20 seconds of stirring with a spatula type
tool, cools 5 lbs of beans in less than 2 minutes, all the way
to ambiente temp. (done it over 100 times now.  On a screen over
a box fan, with a little stirring, I'm pretty sure those 5 lbs
would cool about as quickly.  Building a motorized agitater and 
a chaff collecter (are we bbqing inside now?) to go with that,
as Ed is proposing, is ...is...beyond the bounds of common sense
and maybe getting carried away a little bit. Maybe just a
little bit. ;o)
Charlie
--- floyd burton  wrote:
<Snip>
=====
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10) From: Ed Needham
I actually 'am' roasting in my garage now, at least until warm weather comes,
then I have no idea what I'm going to do.  Now I have this BBQ grill
outfitted with the 5/8" shaft 30 RPM 'mondo' motor, and it really can't be
left out in the elements.  (Think! Think! Think!...What to do???  I think I
need a nap.)
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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11) From: Ed Needham
To absurdity and beyond!
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.com
ed
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12) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 12:13 1/11/03, Mike McGinness typed:
<Snip>
 2min,
<Snip>
..) Of
<Snip>
 cooling!
This sounds like the "normal" cool down profile of my modified WBI.  It is=
 
nice though, and congrats.
BTW, I  WAS happy with my present modifications to my WBI.  Then you when 
and boosted your Rosto fan motor.  If I do that too, I could probably 
increase roast capacity at least 25 %.....Thanks.....I think :-\
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Roasting and Blending by Gestalt
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13) From: floyd burton
Ed-what did u use to connect the "mondo" motor shaft to the roaster
shaft-that one is still in the air for me.  ALso fyi I found the same motor
we have in a Dayton's catalog listing for $260.  Do you see any way to
change or check the oil level in the gear box-all I see is some screws in
the plate holding it together.  Won't fool with it till I see if it runs ok.
Also I plan to mount a shiney metal-maybe even SS- heat shield between the
motor and the grill.  Leave a slot large enough to accomodate the 5/8" drum
axel.  Charlie's comment on the box fan cooler working very quickly is good
to know-if I ever start doing 5# batches.  Have a # of friends who have
small eateries-may roast some for them.

14) From: Mike McGinness
From: "AlChemist John" 
Sometime around 12:13 1/11/03, Mike McGinness typed:
<Snip>
Of
<Snip>
*This sounds like the "normal" cool down profile of my modified WBI.  It is
nice though, and congrats.
The Rosto's stainless steel roast chamber takes a bit to cool down... (Used
to take 'bout all the 5min cooling cycle to get down to 120f)
*BTW, I  WAS happy with my present modifications to my WBI.  Then you when
and boosted your Rosto fan motor.  If I do that too, I could probably
increase roast capacity at least 25 %.....Thanks.....I think :-\
Glad to be of service:-)
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

15) From: jim gundlach
On Sunday, January 12, 2003, at 09:21 AM, Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>
Add a way to automatically dump the chaff into a worm bed.
Jim Gundlach
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

16) From: Ed Needham
You're going from 5/8" shaft to 5/8" right?  That should be an easy one.
Grainger's has a coupler ($21) that you could adapt easily.  It has three
pieces.  One mounts on the end of each shaft.  The middle piece you can
discard.  Each coupler mates with the other, and at slow RPM's, and with a
shaft that cannot move much laterally, it doesn't need the middle piece,
which is intended to take the 'slop' out of the union of the two couplers.
My situation is different.  I'm going from a 5/8" motor shaft to a 3/8"
square BBQ spit.  I bartered a jar of my homeroast at a local auto electric
shop and got a coupler that came from a starter bendix.  He won and I won.  I
like that. I then fit a 7/16" socket onto the 5/8" hole for a perfect
friction fit.  I need to dill it a bit so the setscrew will have a little
indent to grab onto, but otherwise a no-brainer.  I joined the 1/4" square
hole of the 7/16" socket to the 1/4" square hole of a 5/16" socket with a
short (3/4" long) piece of 1/4" square rod.  The rod was a tight friction
fit, and I don't think it'll come loose, but I will probably epoxy the three
pieces together just to make sure  The 3/8" square spit fits perfectly into
the 5/16" socket.  Don't do the math, just trust me that a 3/8" square rod
fits a 5/16" double hex socket.  Neat how it all fit together.
I mounted the motor to the grill and connected up all the wiring with conduit
and a switch Saturday evening, but didn't get to make the final connection
and check it out.  Today (Sunday) was a total loss as far as time to work on
it.  Monday and Tuesday will be the same.  I'm hoping I can get out there to
the workshop Wednesday and finish it up.  I'll be out of coffee about that
time too, so I have no option but finish it.  Oh, I guess I could pull out
the HWP, but this is so much more fun .
I wonder how long it'll be before I get bored with 5 pound batches?  More!
More!  More!  Probat?  Diedrich?  Here I come!
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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17) From: Ed Needham
You're going from 5/8" shaft to 5/8" right?  That should be an easy one.
Grainger's has a coupler ($21) that you could adapt easily.  It has three
pieces.  One mounts on the end of each shaft.  The middle piece you can
discard.  Each coupler mates with the other, and at slow RPM's, and with a
shaft that cannot move much laterally, it doesn't need the middle piece,
which is intended to take the 'slop' out of the union of the two couplers.
My situation is different.  I'm going from a 5/8" motor shaft to a 3/8"
square BBQ spit.  I bartered a jar of my homeroast at a local auto electric
shop and got a coupler that came from a starter bendix.  He won and I won.  I
like that. I then fit a 7/16" socket onto the 5/8" hole for a perfect
friction fit.  I need to dill it a bit so the setscrew will have a little
indent to grab onto, but otherwise a no-brainer.  I joined the 1/4" square
hole of the 7/16" socket to the 1/4" square hole of a 5/16" socket with a
short (3/4" long) piece of 1/4" square rod.  The rod was a tight friction
fit, and I don't think it'll come loose, but I will probably epoxy the three
pieces together just to make sure  The 3/8" square spit fits perfectly into
the 5/16" socket.  Don't do the math, just trust me that a 3/8" square rod
fits a 5/16" double hex socket.  Neat how it all fit together.
I mounted the motor to the grill and connected up all the wiring with conduit
and a switch Saturday evening, but didn't get to make the final connection
and check it out.  Today (Sunday) was a total loss as far as time to work on
it.  Monday and Tuesday will be the same.  I'm hoping I can get out there to
the workshop Wednesday and finish it up.  I'll be out of coffee about that
time too, so I have no option but finish it.  Oh, I guess I could pull out
the HWP, but this is so much more fun .
I wonder how long it'll be before I get bored with 5 pound batches?  More!
More!  More!  Probat?  Diedrich?  Here I come!
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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18) From: Ed Needham
With a 'worm gear'. 
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.com
ed
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19) From: Charles Haynes
I usually roast 12oz batches. When the roast finishes I spread the
beans out onto one 1/2 sheet aluminum baking pan, let sit for maybe
2 min, switch to a second pan for maybe 2 min more (aluminum conducts
the heat really well, plus the large surface area encourages
convection). Then I dump the beans into a mesh colander and finish
with a hair dryer with the heating element turned off. I get room
temperature in 5-8 min this way.
	-- Charles
In message <7E03474C-2654-11D7-8711-003065D58546>, jim gundlach writes
:
<Snip>
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