HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Sumatra and a Newbie (17 msgs / 345 lines)
1) From: Jason & Laura Brooks
Greetings listers,
	I am a neophyte to both coffee roasting and the list.  I feel in love 
with fresh roasted Sumatra from my local Whole Foods Grocery store.  The 
smoke, earthy flavors were exqusite, almost overpowering. I have read 
about roasting the Sumatras on the SW site.  My roaster is the 
Hearthware Gourmet.  When I last roasted the Sumatra, I roasted it for 
10 minutes(currently, I do not have a thermometer).  After letting it 
rest for some time, approx 36-48 hours, it still lacked the earthiness 
that I loved in the other Sumatra.  With all that said, does anyone have 
any recommendations on roasting Sumatra?
Thanks,
Jason Brooks
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2) From: Jason & Laura Brooks
Greetings listers,
	I am a neophyte to both coffee roasting and the list.  I feel in love
with fresh roasted Sumatra from my local Whole Foods Grocery store.  The
smoke, earthy flavors were exqusite, almost overpowering. I have read
about roasting the Sumatras on the SW site.  My roaster is the
Hearthware Gourmet.  When I last roasted the Sumatra, I roasted it for
10 minutes(currently, I do not have a thermometer).  After letting it
rest for some time, approx 36-48 hours, it still lacked the earthiness
that I loved in the other Sumatra.  With all that said, does anyone have
any recommendations on roasting Sumatra?
Thanks,
Jason Brooks
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3) From: Ben Treichel
In order to get help, people will want to know, where the green came 
from, how was it ground & brewed. All of those can effect your results. 
BTW, WELCOME!
Jason & Laura Brooks wrote:
<Snip>
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4) From: Jim Gundlach
I usually roast earthy coffees like the Sumatra to just barely into the 
second crack.  I also try to take them quickly through the first crack 
and taper of to a slow rise in temperature to the second.
     Jim Gundlach
On Wednesday, January 15, 2003, at 08:46 PM, Jason & Laura Brooks wrote:
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5) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Jason & Laura Brooks" 
<Snip>
Sumatras vary widely in their character. Some are earthier than others.
While Debi is more into the Indonesians than I am I appreciate them too. My
all time favorite was the Gayoland Tom offered 01. Nothing has matched it
since. The Lintong Tom carried 01 was close. Currently roasting a Sumatra
Gayo Mountain from another source. I haven't cared for any of the "triple
picks" because they are too "clean" a cup for the Sumatra Indo earthy spice
character we like! For a somewhat cleaner Indo yet still some earthy tones
we always have Sulawesi in stash.
Roast wise I've lightened and lengthened the roast. Roast to just the first
touch of 2nd crack, 450f my temp, profiled 5min to 350f then 10min more to
450f for total roast time 15min. Longer slower roasting brings out more
body.
If you really like earthy, like Debi does, you might try India Moonsooned
Malabar. Now that's one low toned funky cup! It's one of her favorites
straight up, not as a blender coffee. Not the same earthy as Sumatra but you
might like it. (love Tom's Zombie coffee analogy:-)
Good luck and enjoy the journey!
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
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6) From: Rick Farris
Jim wrote:
<Snip>
That makes me wonder something.  Just before Christmas I bought an
Alpenrost.  With it I found that instead of all my favorites getting better,
some of them became dull.  (This is curious to me because some of the HotTop
beta testers reported that the HT made all coffee better.)
Are there certain greens that are more amenable to low & slow drum roasting?
Should I use really bright Central Americans to retain some brightness in
the end product, or should I concentrate on "body" greens, and try to blow
that up to heroic proportions?
-- Rick
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7) From: Ben Treichel
Mike McGinness wrote:
<Snip>
Interesting. I just roasted my first batch of MM (cooling now). Profile 
was 3:45 @ 350, 9:20 @ 400, 11:20 @ 410, 14:30 @ 430, 16:30 @ 225. Now, 
just the rest before I get funky ( and decide if I like it).
Ben
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8) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Rick Farris" 
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better,
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HotTop
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roasting?
<Snip>
The answer to your multiple choice question is YES! (in other words play
with it and let your palate decide...:-)
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
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9) From: Rick Farris
Mike wrote:
<Snip>
Mike!  You don't have a drum roaster!  I'm not looking for platitudes here,
I'm looking for some wisdom based on *experience*!  :-)
So let me re-ask my question in a different form:
Those of you who actually have drum roasters: What greens do you think are
especially well treated by drum roasting?
Bonus question for those with both drum- and air- roasters: Do you have
specific coffees that you roast in the air roaster and others that you
prefer the drum roast?
Personally, I roast the Mokhas in the air roaster because they are too small
for the Alp...
-- Rick
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10) From: Michael Horowitz
<Snip>
I like that.
I gotta adopt that attitude.
It's not an objective to quickly find the coffee I like and stick with it;
it's a walk thru the flower shop admiring all the different ones, sniffing
as I go and enjoying each for what it offers.
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11) From: Jason & Laura Brooks
Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>
The Sumatra I had was Sumatra Mandheling DP1 2002.  After roasting, I 
let it rest for approx. 36 hours, ground it in a Braun electric 
grinder(blade type), to a medium fine ground, and roasted it in a Mr. 
Coffee coffee maker.  Nothing fancy, but the same setup has given some 
exquisite Sumatra before.  I am going to try and vary my roast time on 
the remainder, as well as look into a thermometer for my Hearthware 
Gourmet to do more precise measurements while roasting.
Thanks again,
Jason Brooks
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12) From: Ben Treichel
Jason & Laura Brooks wrote:
<Snip>
A blade grinder can give you inconsistant results. And I wouldn't swear 
that a Mr. Coffee is exactly stable. BTW, have you cleaned your Mr. C in 
the past month?
However, I have had the same problem with Kenys coffee's. I'm thinking 
that since I air roast, that the fast roast was adding to the 
brightness. Now that I've tamed my FR, I will try agin in the future. 
Always something else to learn
Ben
<Snip>
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13) From: Ed Needham
I have thoroughly enjoyed the body and complexity I've gotten with a drum
roaster with all beans.  Last night I roasted my first 5 pound batch with the
larger Frontgate can hooked up to the 30 RPM gearmotor I bought from the
Surplus Center (thanks Deward for the tip).  I roasted Costa Rican Tarrazu to
just a bit past first crack.  Too dark and you lose all the really great CR
complexity.  Too light and it's grassy and sour.  I think I pegged it, right
on the money.
Kenya seems to do really well in my drum roaster too, as does Mexican
Chiapas.  I need a drum with very tiny holes so I can roast Yemens and other
tiny beans.  I still roast them in my HWP.
I plan on posting pictures very soon.  The roaster turned out really nice.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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14) From: Tom & Maria
By this weekend we will have another Sumatra on the list, the Blue 
Batak. That is a clean Sumatra with a really neat, refined cinnamon 
aftertaste. The Mandheling Grade One is all new crop and this is the 
"earthiest" time of year for Sumatras, so if thats not earthy enough 
it might be hard to find something more extreme without getting into 
aged coffees. A lighter roast on the Sumatra is often the more potent 
cup, and a Sulawesi or Sumatra that has a mottled color after 
roasting might not look very nice, but will cup really well. They all 
need to rest a long time. Sulwesi is cupping stronger in earthiness 
this season (all new crop too, but I just went through a batch of 
samples and they were beyond musty, they were mildewy. Yuck. I 
remember the Gayo Mtn. mill mentioned below. One of the ugliest 
looking coffees we ever had but a really pungent, earthy cup. But 
Gayo Mtn. isnt producing coffee like that lately... they are all 
quite clean now. And Gayo land (a different mill) has been mixing old 
and new crop coffees in the recent samples -you can tell right away 
when you see it. Not a good thing...
Tom
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tmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
		1455 64th Street Emeryville CA 94608
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15) From: dewardh
Tom:
Is that Aged Sulawesi you sampled me the same as the "Sulawesi Sulotco Farm" 
now listed, or something new?  Whatever . . . don't sell the last of it until I 
get my order in . . . please . . . .  No time to rest and already we know we 
want it (it is *good* when she just says "buy some" ) .  Don't even need to 
drink it . . . I could just sit and smell it all night.  If it weren't bedtime 
.. . . oh well . . . tomorrow, with some Sidamo, Saturday with some Rimy . . . 
life is *very* good . . .
Apropos the Z&D, catalyst and all . . . I sampled the Aged Sulawesi in my HWP 
(2nd at 7 minutes, "cool" at 7:20) in the kitchen, and was reminded of  how 
much I *like* the smell of roasting coffee (including the way it fills the 
house ).  I can see the marketing advantage of "no smoke, reduced smell" . . 
.. but I didn't like what the "catalyzed" exhaust smelled like.  It's not a 
"bad" smell, I guess, but I grew up loving the smell of the roasters down on 
the San Francisco waterfront . . . and I love that "real" smell still . . .
My but this "roasting thing" seems to be growing on me .
Deward
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16) From: Spencer W. Thomas
I've been having trouble hitting the "sweet spot" with the Sumatran 
Iskandar Triple-Pick Finally, this time I think I got it (or at least 
close).  I did a profiled roast (350 @ about 5min, finish 460 @ 11 min, 
slow ramp, about 40 seconds into 2nd crack) using my (slightly modified) 
Poppery (I).  The beans came out dark brown and shiny.  36 hours later, 
it was good but not great, but this morning (60 hours) I could really 
pick up that chocolatey "Sumatran" taste that I was looking for. Tom 
recommends "just before 2nd crack starts", but that didn't work for me.
But for a really powerful cup, I have to recommend the Aged Sumatra 
Mandheling.  I took it deep into 2nd crack, gave it 3 days rest (60 
hours -- I roast in the evening and drink in the morning, mostly).  Wow! 
 As Tom says, "spicy, pungent."  The second time I roasted it, I didn't 
get it quite as dark, and it was not as good.
=Spencer
Jason & Laura Brooks wrote:
<Snip>
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17) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
My sweet spot for the Iskandar is a fast roast ending in 3.4 minutes at the
first divot on the dump tray. Because of the larger bean size, I allow a
longer time than my normal 2.5 to 3 minute fast roasts. It is bright, spicy,
sweet, with a slightly peppery mouthfeel. And it is good right from the
roaster, no need to wait for it to go stale.
--
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