HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Kopi Luwak (59 msgs / 1459 lines)
1) From: John - Deep Southern Texas
ML,
    Yep! I have an extrodinary friend who sent me enough for a roasting
session and a brewed pot + one shot.   Its pretty good "stuff" and is ful=
l
bodied like most Africans.  There are a couple of real pros on the list t=
hat
can break it down far better than I can.  But if you are wanting to be a
coffee officinato, you just gotta do it once.  As for its availability,
there is a site that offers it all year.  Do a Google search on Kopi Luwa=
k
and you'll find it.
John - still walking and healthy after drinking it :O)
--

2) From: Scott
What's the link for the SM cupping review of Kopi Luwak?? I couldn't find it
in the archives.

3) From: Gary White
Speaking of the infamous poopoo bean, what's the chance of SM getting some
more, Tom?  I was about to order some last time when you ran out.
Gary

4) From: Scott Jensen
Tom are you going to be able to get the Luwak coffee this year?  Would sure
enjoy getting some more!
Scott

5) From: Mike & Debi McGinness
I just ordered a pound of Kopi Luwak greens. The World's rarest coffee. Cost $156.00 inc. s/h. If
you haven't heard of it here's a write up:http://www.sallys-place.com/beverages/coffee/kopi_luwak.htmWill it be worth it? Let's see, assuming roasting to City with say 15% weight loss a pound will
roast out to about 13.6oz . Times 28 (28gr to an oz) makes 380.8 grams, divided by 7.25 equals 52.5
cups. $156 divided by 52.5 equals $2.97 per cup. Who's ever paid $3 for any coffee drink at a coffee
stand? I have. I just had to try some, you only live once as the saying goes...
Anyone care to go halves on the pound?! USPS Priority shipping to you would be $4 anywhere in the
US. ($156/2 + 4 = $82 total.)
And no, I'm not addicted to coffee! I'm not, I'm not, I'm not, I'm not, I'm not... Ok, I am.
MM;-)
Home Roasting in the Beautifully Green Great Pacific Northwest
(no, it doesn't rain ALL the time! But is today...)
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6) From: Monty Harris
I've had it and was not impressed.  
I hope your experience is better!!  
I thought it tasted like s%&T!
;0)
Monty
At 08:54 AM 7/17/01 -0700, you wrote:
<Snip>
Cost $156.00 inc. s/h. If
<Snip>
weight loss a pound will
<Snip>
divided by 7.25 equals 52.5
<Snip>
any coffee drink at a coffee
<Snip>
goes...
<Snip>
would be $4 anywhere in the
<Snip>
I'm not... Ok, I am.
<Snip>
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7) From: Jim McClellan
All the sudden that St Helena I didn't order because it was just so
expensive is sounding like an amazing bargain!

8) From: JKG
<Snip>
coffee. Cost $156.00 inc. s/h. If
<Snip>
15% weight loss a pound will
<Snip>
grams, divided by 7.25 equals 52.5
<Snip>
for any coffee drink at a coffee
<Snip>
saying goes...
<Snip>
you would be $4 anywhere in the
<Snip>
I believe that Tom sold the Kopi Luwak at a fraction of that price
around a year ago.  I've tried lots of food and beverages, but that
offering didn't tempt me then and still doesn't.  :-)  I'd almost be
half
hoping that it wasn't authentic.  *grin*  Different strokes for
different
folks, however.
JKG
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9) From: Young McQueen
HOW do you REALLY KNOW it not just Indonesian that has been laying around.
If you say "Reputable Dealer" then my question is how does he know.
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10) From: Mike & Debi McGinness
From: "Young McQueen" 
<Snip>
I consider Tom a "Reputable Dealer" (though not the source I'm getting Luwak.) HOW do I REALLY KNOW
the Kona Coffees sold by Tom aren't Costa Rican! Does he go over to Hawaii and pick the cherries,
ferment them, pulp them, dry them etc etc etc.? Trust must come in at some point.
MM;-)
Home Roasting in the Beautifully Green Great Pacific Northwest
(It doesn't rain ALL the time!)
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11) From: Thom Underwood
Young,
Of anyone on this chat group you better understand the issues around the
concept of "country of origin" (or in this case animal of origin).  Usually
there are indications of origin identifiable in the product itself (i.e. a
North African bean may not smell, or roast like a Pacific or a Costa Rican)
but ultimately when it gets down to it you must trust the supplier (or
choose not to) and decide from your own experience.  We all do this now with
Sweet Maria's.  Nonetheless, the closer you can get to the original supplier
(in this case the rear end of the luwak) the better but trust will always be
a factor in any business transaction.
Besides, as my career public relations wife would say, "perception is
everything".  If I think I'm drinking Luwak... then I am.
Regards - Thom

12) From: Gary Zimmerman
 
Thom Underwood wrote:
<Snip>
Sounds like the name of a Tony Hillerman novel:
  "Drinking Luwak"
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13) From: TFisher511
At $156 per pound, are there 12 ounces or 16 ounces in that pound of Kopi 
Luwak? Sounds like maybe it should be sold in Troy ounces. Don't get me 
wrong, there is usually a good reason when they sell it 12 ounces per pound.
Terry F
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14) From: Young McQueen
RE: "But why limit the dishonesty against the 'rich Americans' to those in
third world countries?  My guess is that there are more large American
coffee traders benefiting from dishonesty than the small time coffee
farmers. "
I know this back and forth can go on forever so this will be my last comment
on this... The subject is Kopi Luwak and I don't think "Large American
coffee traders" are going to be much involved in this tiny market. Any way
the point bottom line point I was making is that it is difficult to KNOW you
are really drinking Kopi Luwak.
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15) From: Mike & Debi McGinness
From: "Young McQueen" 
<Snip>
After now trying, what I believe to be Luwak, I can safely say there is nothing to compare it to.
Nothing even comes close. (I hope my write-up went through, been having email provider problems...)
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver USA
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16) From: Ed Needham
Hey, I was agreeing with you!
Regards,
Ed Needham

17) From: jim gundlach
Some time ago I exchanged some of the kopi luwak that I got from Tom 
some time ago with a member of the list who had just paid the market 
price for some.  He had a slight preference for his expensive luwak but 
he did indicate that Tom's luwak had very much the same distinct taste 
that he found in his.  So if Tome does manage to get some more kopi 
luwak for a reasonable price, you can be sure that you will be getting 
the real thing.   Doubting Thomas's may never be convinced.
I did not like the kopi very much but having experienced the rare and 
unique bean is something I do not regret at all.
       Jim Gundlach
       Roasting over pecan wood fires
        near Shorter, Alabama
On Wednesday, February 20, 2002, at 03:18 PM, Gary Zimmerman wrote:
<Snip>
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18) From:
<Snip>
I've been wondering about why this is so expensive?  Really Tom's price of
$7 lb, seems much more in line.
The Luwak picks all the ripe cherries, saving labor intensive work.
You just have to go around and scoop up piles of maybe 15 to 20 seeds (or
more) with a shovel and toss it in a wheel barrow.  Dump it out and wash.
It's already removed from the cherry!!  Seems like a cheap source of labor
to me!  Plus you don't have to pay some one to exterminate luwaks- another
cost savings!
Scott :)
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19) From: JB Christy
Picking up large, steaming piles of dung and sifting through it to find a few
kernels of any worth sounds alot like my last job.  They had to pay me a *lot*.
:-/
--JB
<Snip>
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20) From: Dale House
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
    I trust Tom will not take offense if I point out the enormously =
entertaining little animation at the web site of Ketchikan, Alaska's =
Raven's Roast.  http://www.ravensbrew.com/NewFiles/kopiluwak.html. =
Some of you may already have already picked it up from the Washington =
Times article circulated earlier.  (The humor of the artist, Ray Troll, =
is widely appreciated here in Alaska.)  I have a lever machine, but not =
quite like this.
    D. House

21) From: HalfHyde
Has anyone tried this expensive rarity? Or know how often it is available. I read an article on it last night and a few of us at work may want to go in on a pound.
Thanks,
ML
Phoenix, AZ
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22) From: Mike McGinness
From: 
<Snip>
I read an article on it last night and a few of us at work may want to go in
on a pound.
<Snip>
Hi ML,
I had to chuckle at your info' request! Check the archives of about a year
ago, quite a bit of KL discussion. I bought a pound of 'greens' for $150
'bout this time last year. If you can't find the source contact me off list.
On a KL humorous note here's a write up you may not have seen:-)
Dave Barry on Kopi Luwak
I have exciting news for anybody who would like to pay a lot of money for
coffee that has passed all the way through an animal's digestive tract.
And you just know there are plenty of people who would.
Specialty coffees are very popular these days, attracting millions of
consumers, every single one of whom is standing in line ahead of me whenever
I go to the coffee place at the airport to grab a quick cup on my way to
catch a plane.
These consumers are always ordering mutant beverages with names like
"mocha-almond-honey-vinaigrette lattespressacino," beverages that must be
made one at a time via a lengthy and complex process involving approximately
one coffee bean, three quarts of dairy products and what appears to be a
small nuclear reactor.
Meanwhile, back in the line, there is growing impatience among those of us
who just want a plain old cup of coffee so that our brains will start
working and we can remember what our full names are and why we are catching
an airplane.
We want to strike the lattespressacino people with our carry-on baggage and
scream "Get out of our way, you trend geeks, and let us have our coffee!"
But of course we couldn't do anything that active until we've had our
coffee.
It is inhumane, in my opinion, to force people who have a genuine medical
need for coffee to wait in line behind people who apparently view it as some
kind of recreational activity.
I bet this kind of thing does not happen to heroin addicts. I bet that when
serious heroin addicts go to purchase their heroin, they do not tolerate
waiting in line while some dilettante in front of them orders a hazelnut
smack-a-cino with cinnamon sprinkles.
The reason some of us need coffee is that it contains caffeine, which makes
us alert. Of course it is very important to remember that caffeine is a
drug, and, like any drug, it is a lot of fun.
No! Wait! What I meant to say is: Like any drug, caffeine can have serious
side effects if we ingest too much. This fact was first noticed in ancient
Egypt when a group of workers, who were supposed to be making a birdbath,
began drinking Egyptian coffee, which is very strong, and wound up
constructing the pyramids.
I myself developed the coffee habit in my early 20s, when, as a "cub"
reporter for the Daily Local News in West Chester, Pa., I had to stay awake
while writing phenomenally boring stories about municipal government. I got
my coffee from a vending machine that also sold hot chocolate and
chicken-noodle soup; all three liquids squirted out of a single tube, and
they tasted pretty much the same. But I came to need that coffee, and even
today I can do nothing useful before I've had several cups. (I can't do
anything useful afterward, either; that's why I'm a columnist.)
But here's my point: This specialty-coffee craze has gone too far.
I say this in light of a letter I got recently from alert reader Bo Bishop.
He sent me an invitation he received from a local company to a "private
tasting of the highly prized Luwak coffee," which "at $300 a pound ... is
one of the most expensive drinks in the world."
The invitation states that this coffee is named for the luwak, a "member of
the weasel family" that lives on the Island of Java and eats coffee berries;
as the berries pass through the luwak, a "natural fermentation" takes place,
and the berry seeds - the coffee beans - come out of the luwak intact.
The beans are then gathered, washed, roasted and sold to coffee
connoisseurs.
The invitation states: "We wish to pass along this once in a lifetime
opportunity to taste such a rarity.
Or, as Bo Bishop put it: "They're selling processed weasel doodoo for $300 a
pound."
I first thought this was a clever hoax designed to ridicule the coffee
craze. Tragically, it is not. There really is a Luwak coffee. I know because
I bought some from a specialty-coffee company in Atlanta.
I paid $37.50 for two ounces of beans. I was expecting the beans to look
exotic, considering where they'd been, but they looked like regular coffee
beans. In fact, for a moment I was afraid that they were just regular beans,
and that I was being ripped off.
Then I thought: What kind of world is this when you worry that people might
be ripping you off by selling you coffee that was NOT pooped out by a
weasel?
So anyway, I ground the beans up and brewed the coffee and drank some. You
know how sometimes, when you're really skeptical about something, but then
you finally try it, you discover that it's really good, way better than you
would have thought possible? This is not the case with Luwak coffee. Luwak
coffee, in my opinion, tastes like somebody washed a dead cat in it.
But I predict it's going to be popular anyway, because it's expensive. One
of these days, the people in front of me at the airport coffee place are
going to be ordering decaf poopacino. I'm thinking of switching to heroin.
(Dave Barry is distributed by Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services.
Lettrs can be mailed to Dave Barry, c/o Tropic Magazine, The Miami Herald,
One Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132)
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23) From: Charlie Herlihy
Mike McGuiness wrote>Hi ML,
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
The archive thread is quite humerous as well. Questions pop up on alt.coffee from time to time and get the occasional serious answer. From what I've read it depends a lot on whether the animals are eating(or being fed, in cages) arabica or robusta beans. There's also a lot of doubts as to authenticity sometimes. I think that Mike is the only one to write that he liked Kopi Luwak.
 12 lbs. of St. Helena, 50 lbs of La Berlina, or one lb. of Luwak?  Decisions ,decisions...;)
Charlie
---------------------------------
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Autos - Get free new car price quotes

24) From: Tom & Maria
<Snip>
Might I suggest you get a lb of Uganda Robusta -Nanga Farms - very 
close cup profile brewed in a french press, a little bit cheaper. -tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
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25) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Tom & Maria" 
<Snip>
"A little cheaper", now that's an understatement! :-) Though I haven't tried
the Uganda Robusta (yet) I still don't regret forking out the ludicrous
amount for # of KL last year. Quite the experience and unique cup. Have one
batch vac'd left to roast some time....
MM;-)
Home Ju-Ju Variable Variac Rockin' Rosto Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
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26) From: Brian Ray

ML - i tried it this past year - my colleagues chipped in for a 1/4 pound - i think that i may have underroasted it but it was not very impressive in any case.  we did, however, enjoy the anticipation of its arrival and made a suitably ridiculous ritual of drinking it and gained notoriety from reports of it went around the building.  however, when i told tom about it his response was that i should try the vietnamese robusta which cupped similarly!

for another very humorous discussion of the bean check out:

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/010525.html

<Has anyone tried this expensive rarity? Or know how often it is available. I read an article on it last night and a few of us at work may want to go in on a pound. > Thanks,
Join the world’s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. Click Here homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

27) From: Ed Needham
The article...well, I couldn't have said it better myself.  Now, that little
graphic that goes with the article... it is priceless!  It should be
emblazoned on the coffee mug of anyone who is enough of an aficionado to try
the stuff.
Kopi Luw...ack! .
Ed Needham
ed
**********************************************

28) From: Mark Prince
At 10:26 AM 17/07/2002, you wrote:
<Snip>
I've still got 4lbs of the stuff, sitting oh, maybe 3 feet away from me as 
I type, thanks to the generosity (and misfortune) of an old list member 
who's probably not reading any longer, Reverend Rich Lyons. Rich had to 
give up coffee on Dr's orders, and sent me the last 5lbs of Kopi Luwak he had.
This was part of the (in)famous batch that Tom procured a couple of years 
ago. I bought 5lbs on my own, but that has long since gone. I'm keeping 
this remaining 4lbs around as a novelty; I doubt if I sold it on eBay if 
anyone would believe what it was :)
Note - it hasn't aged too badly either. Tom, you still have any of that 
washed stuff left over yourself?
Mark
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29) From: Tim Jolicoeur
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Has anyone had experience at roasting and cupping the Kopi Luwak beans? =
Are they really worth $110.00-$135.00/LB?
Best Regards,
Timothy M. Jolicoeur
HMS Co. LLC., 2170 East Big Beaver Rd.
V-Code: 346, Mail Code:480.617.001
E-Mail: tim.jolicoeur 
Ph: 248.740-7040 Ex138, Fx: 248.740.1105
 
The information contained in this message is confidential and is =
intended for the addressee(s) only. If you have received this message in =
error or there are any problems please notify the originator =
immediately.
 

30) From: John Abbott
Tim,
As a really good friend told me.. "You need to do this just for the
experience."   It was a good cup and I was surprised at how much I liked
it.  But I don't know that I would have tried it if my friend hadn't
sent me 3 ounces to roast.  Its part of the total experience of coffee
and I would have forever wondered.  
John - thinking this mornings cup of CRLM is under roasted
On Mon, 2003-05-12 at 06:48, Tim Jolicoeur wrote:
    Has anyone had experience at roasting and cupping the Kopi Luwak
    beans? Are they really worth $110.00-$135.00/LB?
    Best Regards,
    Timothy M. Jolicoeur
    HMS Co. LLC., 2170 East Big Beaver Rd.
    V-Code: 346, Mail Code:480.617.001
    E-Mail: tim.jolicoeur
    Ph: 248.740-7040 Ex138, Fx: 248.740.1105
     
    The information contained in this message is confidential and is
    intended for the addressee(s) only. If you have received this
    message in error or there are any problems please notify the
    originator immediately.

31) From: miKe mcKoffee

32) From: Ron
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
good or not I don't think I want to try any coffee that has gone totaly =
thru the digestive track of a weasel.
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC

33) From: Tim Jolicoeur
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ron I tend to agree with you but there is no regulation on any coffee =
bean harvesting, so what process was used when other beans are =
harvested? This Kopi Luwak bean had struck my curiosity even if a mammal =
ingests them. TJ

34) From: Phil Jordan
You have something against weasels?
On Tue, 13 May 2003 05:36:39 -0400, Ron wrote
<Snip>

35) From: jimgundlach
--Apple-Mail-6--644273580
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	format=flowed
On Tuesday, May 13, 2003, at 04:36 AM, Ron wrote:
<Snip>
A little more than a year, or maybe it was two or even three, ago Tom 
offered some Kopi Luwak at a reasonable price to members of the list.  
It does have a unique taste and one of my kids thought it was among the 
best she had tasted.  I did not put it any where near the top of my 
preferred list and do not think it is worth the money it usually goes 
for except for someone who wants to experience a full range of coffee 
culture.  The major attraction is the unusual processing along with 
marketing hype.  Someone is making a lot of profit off of beans picked 
by unpaid Luwaki.  I count myself among those who want to experience 
the full range of coffee culture and I am quite happy that Tom offered 
it even though it did not meet his usual cupping standards because I 
would have tried it at the higher prices some time or other.
Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-6--644273580
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charset-ASCII
On Tuesday, May 13, 2003, at 04:36 AM, Ron wrote:
Arialgood or not I don't
think I want to try any coffee that has gone totaly thru the digestive
track of a weasel.
ArialRon
1998,1998,FFFErnkyle
Home Roasting in SC
A little more than a year, or maybe it was two or even three, ago Tom
offered some Kopi Luwak at a reasonable price to members of the list. 
It does have a unique taste and one of my kids thought it was among
the best she had tasted.  I did not put it any where near the top of
my preferred list and do not think it is worth the money it usually
goes for except for someone who wants to experience a full range of
coffee culture.  The major attraction is the unusual processing along
with marketing hype.  Someone is making a lot of profit off of beans
picked by unpaid Luwaki.  I count myself among those who want to
experience the full range of coffee culture and I am quite happy that
Tom offered it even though it did not meet his usual cupping standards
because I would have tried it at the higher prices some time or other.
Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-6--644273580--

36) From: John Abbott
Ron,
Just curious - ever eat an egg?  Ever think about its track?  
We of course now know that raw eggs are dangerous because of potential E
coli and Salmonella. E.coli is a bacterium and is a normal inhabitant of
a healthy bird’s intestines.  It belongs to the family of bacteria which
also includes Salmonella, Proteus, Citrobacter, Shigella and
Klebsiella.  All these bacteria have an affinity for living in animal
intestines. As a result, they are disseminated widely in the environment
via poultry litter, faeces, washing from houses etc, ie in any material
contaminated with faeces.  
Kopi Luwak after roasting is at least as safe as an egg - and contains
no cholesterol. 
On Tue, 2003-05-13 at 04:36, Ron wrote:
    good or not I don't think I want to try any coffee that has gone
    totaly thru the digestive track of a weasel.
    Ron
    rnkyle
    Home Roasting in SC

37) From: Ron
Well John you got me, yes I do eat eggs. I still think at this time I will
leave the Kopi Luwak out of my coffee selections. I was wondering it must be
really hard following these little creatures around and collecting there
droppings. I wonder how long it takes to get a lb of this rare and unique
coffee.
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC

38) From: Ron
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Tim posted:
<Snip>
bean harvesting, so what process was used >when other beans are =
harvested? This Kopi Luwak bean >had struck my curiosity even if a =
mammal ingests them. 
  You know I have often thought how some of the coffee we get is =
handled, then I think 450+degrees of heat, not to much could survive. Im =
no expert on surviving germ and bacteria life though.
  Ron
  rnkyle
  Home Roasting in SC

39) From: Ron
Phil posted:
<Snip>
No not really, I once owned a Ferret, cute little fellow.
Ron
rnkyle
Home Roasting in SC

40) From: John Abbott
Ron, 
I don't know how long it takes - but if you think about the guys that
have to go poking around in it to find the beans - then you might not
think the price is so high :O)  
On Tue, 2003-05-13 at 11:27, Ron wrote:
    Well John you got me, yes I do eat eggs. I still think at this time I w=
ill
    leave the Kopi Luwak out of my coffee selections. I was wondering it mu=
st be
    really hard following these little creatures around and collecting ther=
e
    droppings. I wonder how long it takes to get a lb of this rare and uniq=
ue
    coffee.
    Ron
    rnkyle
    Home Roasting in SC

41) From: Les & Becky
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I missed out on Tom's offering, but I have a roaster connection through =
a friend, and got a sample.  I am glad for the experience as Jim points =
out so well, but wouldn't buy the stuff  as a standard coffee at any =
price.
Les

42) From: Dave McCracken
The discussion about Kopi Luwak got me thinking...
I wonder what other animals might be suitable for eating the cherry and
leaving a usable coffee bean.  It might be interesting to experiment.
I'm guessing most grazing animals (cows, goats, sheep) have too efficient a
digestive tract and will probably destroy the bean, either by chewing or by
digesting it.  Might there be some other domestic animals that would do
better?  Pigs perhaps?  I sense a potential business opportunity for
someone who can figure it out :)
And no, I'm not volunteering :)
Dave McCracken

43) From: Ben Treichel
How about minks! Think about the marketing potential!. I think they are 
in the ferret class, and how well it really works doesn't matter. After 
all, think how well people have accepted folgers, et. al.
Dave McCracken wrote:
<Snip>

44) From: Tim Jolicoeur
Good point Ben!!!! Touché

45) From: John Abbott
A whole new meaning to "Coffee Can!"
On Thu, 2003-05-15 at 09:09, Ben Treichel wrote:
    How about minks! Think about the marketing potential!. I think they are 
    in the ferret class, and how well it really works doesn't matter. After 
    all, think how well people have accepted folgers, et. al.
    
    Dave McCracken wrote:
    
    >The discussion about Kopi Luwak got me thinking...
    >
    >I wonder what other animals might be suitable for eating the cherry and
    >leaving a usable coffee bean.  It might be interesting to experiment.
    >
    >I'm guessing most grazing animals (cows, goats, sheep) have too efficient a
    >digestive tract and will probably destroy the bean, either by chewing or by
    >digesting it.  Might there be some other domestic animals that would do
    >better?  Pigs perhaps?  I sense a potential business opportunity for
    >someone who can figure it out :)
    >
    >And no, I'm not volunteering :)
    >
    >Dave McCracken
    >
    >
    >homeroast mailing list
    >http://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html    >">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast    >To change your personal list settings, seehttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html    >
    >  
    >
    

46) From: Felix Dial
Yet another article on Kopi Luwak
 "Civet Coffee: Good to the Last Dropping "http://makeashorterlink.com/?B5C012227link will take you to an AP article at yahoo news
Respectfully,
     Felix

47) From: owens michael
Hey Tom, I buy some of that kopi coffee. I have tried others that really were poor and way to expensive. But heck you only live once! Please buy it. That's my vote. 
---------------------------------
Post your free ad now! Yahoo! Canada Personals

48) From: Phil Kohl
Not interested!
Phil Kohl

49) From: knutson
When? How Much?
Count me in.
Kevin H. Knutson

50) From: Justin Marquez
Not interested even if it cost the same as regular coffee.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

51) From: Ben Treichel
Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>
Yeah! It reminds me of that old rock song "Cat Crap Fever" ;-)

52) From: Justin Marquez
I was thinking more of the "emperor's new clothes" situation.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com Deja Moo: The feeling that you've heard this bull before.
On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 08:17:11 -0500, Ben Treichel  wrote:
<Snip>
--

53) From: Ben Treichel
Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>
True, but doesn't that happen when you have a fever? I'm sure that 
"Buzzed Penguin" knows.

54) From: Bernard Gerrard
Several years ago a friend of mine "The Queen of Coffee", from Jamaica, 
received a small portion of Kopi Luwak as a birthday gift.  She gets 
Jamaica Blue Mountain "point of origin"  without an outrageous $ outlay 
and is very picky about what she drinks.  We tried JBM and KL side by 
side and agreed that the KL was super.  At that price it should be but 
NOT worth that cost.  It had a "syrupy" mouth feel as Tom noted in his 
tasting notes.  I would add other things (not negative) and it was 
smooth and rich, low acid.  This was before my moving on to High Coffee 
(home roasting with green beans from SM) so scrounging around for a 
great coffee experience is now irrelevant.  Curiosity has been 
satisfied.  There is the one-upmanship of  "Yes, I've tried it."   
Bernard C. Gerrard

55) From: Brett Mason
Has anyone ever tried Elephant Truffles?  They are simply delightful....
On 1/16/07, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

56) From: Sheila Quinn
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Are they as tasty as horse apples or cow pies? ;)
Sheila
Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
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Are they as tasty as horse apples or cow pies? ;)
Sheila
Brett Mason wrote:
Has anyone ever tried Elephant Truffles?  They are simply
delightful....
  
  On 1/16/07, Bernard Gerrard <gerrardbcl
  > wrote:
  Several
years ago a friend of mine "The Queen of Coffee", from Jamaica,
    
received a small portion of Kopi Luwak as a birthday gift.  She gets
Jamaica Blue Mountain "point of origin"  without an outrageous $ outlay
and is very picky about what she drinks.  We tried JBM and KL side by
    
side and agreed that the KL was super.  At that price it should be but
NOT worth that cost.  It had a "syrupy" mouth feel as Tom noted in his
tasting notes.  I would add other things (not negative) and it was
    
smooth and rich, low acid.  This was before my moving on to High Coffee
(home roasting with green beans from SM) so scrounging around for a
great coffee experience is now irrelevant.  Curiosity has been
satisfied.  There is the one-upmanship of  "Yes, I've tried it."
    
Bernard C. Gerrard
  
  
--------------000009010900020304000701--

57) From: Brett Mason
They are unbelievable....
On 1/16/07, Sheila Quinn  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

58) From: Justin Schwarz
--Apple-Mail-1--423889578
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I was kind of waiting for this one to pop up again, didn't feel like  
starting a new civet poo thread.  That said, a couple of weeks ago on  
the news they had a little blip about Kopi Luwak.  The story showed  
the beans and explained that they sold it for 10 bucks a cup, or $42/ 
Lb. I was very disturbed, as the beans appeared to be dripping with  
oil, roasted to the level of near combustion.  I guess they figured  
they had to turn it into charcoal in order to guarantee sterility.
So glad I didn't have to start a new thread for that rant.
houstini
If there is anything worth doing, it's worth doing right.
--Apple-Mail-1--423889578
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	charsetO-8859-1
I was kind of waiting =
for this one to pop up again, didn't feel like starting a new civet poo =
thread.  That said, a couple of weeks ago on the news they had a =
little blip about Kopi Luwak.  The story showed the beans and =
explained that they sold it for 10 bucks a cup, or $42/Lb. I was very =
disturbed, as the beans appeared to be dripping with oil, roasted to the =
level of near combustion.  I guess they figured they had to turn it =
into charcoal in order to guarantee sterility.  
So glad I didn't have to = start a new thread for that rant.
houstini
If there is anything worth = doing, it's worth doing right.

= = --Apple-Mail-1--423889578--

59) From: Michael Loew
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I think we should all have a toast to the brave soul that saw it being =
"processed" and said, "I've got to try some of that"!
Mike


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