HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Bi-metal thermometer vs. thermocouple (5 msgs / 99 lines)
1) From: Mike McGinness
Though I have both, I continue to use the simple Weber bi-metal BBQ
thermometer for monitoring roast. Wondered why. Thinking about it I've come
to the conclusion that the common analog dial read bi-metal thermometers are
accurate for consistent roasting. I remember *playing* at Pele Plantations
my first time Nov 01 and roasting with Gus on his 5# Sivetz. Simple dial
bi-metal Q thermometer is what he's been using for years. He now has added
12# Sivetz with more hi-tech digital monitoring with the ability to set for
auto cool and dump at pre-determined roast temp, the 5# also wired in.
Quality of roast didn't improve, just simpler to do & see large LED readouts
etc.
Thermocouple type heat monitoring is necessary for data feedback to computer
and or auto controlled roasting, but not necessary for manual roasting IMO.
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Mike McGinness  wrote:
<Snip>
 If by manual roasting you mean Rosto roasting, or one of the
other fluid bed roasters then I agree. But the Weber "BBQ"
thermometer has much too slow response time to stick in a wok
roast or my drum/basket system. Letting the bean sit still
waiting for the thermometer to reach 400 degrees (or whatever
high temp) can cause charring and other uneveness in my roasts.
I burnt the insulation off my cheap thermocoupler wires right
away , but I've saved posts from here telling how to shield them
with ss tubing and I'll try and do it right next time. 
Meanwhile, an infared thermometer is giving me very quick
ballpark temp readings that are helpfull.
Charlie
=====
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://mailplus.yahoo.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Oaxaca Charlie" 
<Snip>
Agreed. Bi-metal thermometers are not designed for instant read but are
designed to be left in source monitored. Fluke makes many thermocouple
probes designed for high temperature applications. How about k type surface
probe Measurement range: -127 to 600ºC (-196ºF to 1112ºF) $189http://www.fluke.com/products/home.asp?AGID=0&SID&PID”56!They're out there... for a price:)">http://www.fluke.com/products/home.asp?AGID=0&SID&PID”68or k type air probe Measurement range: -40 to 816ºC (-40 to 1500ºF) $64.http://www.fluke.com/products/home.asp?AGID=0&SID&PID”56!They're out there... for a price:)
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: dewardh
Mike:
<Snip>
and or auto controlled roasting, but not necessary for manual roasting IMO.
Not necessary, to be sure, but easier to read, more accurate, faster 
responding, and you can snake the probe into places that would be difficult if 
not impossible with a "mechanical" dial thermometer.  And if there is any 
chance that "roaster control" will be in your future, the sensors are already 
in place and tested . . .
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: Rick Farris
Mike said:
<Snip>
Not necessary, but I find it way easier to see without craning my neck!
-- Rick
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


HomeRoast Digest