HomeRoast Digest


Topic: yet another reason to roast your own (11 msgs / 243 lines)
1) From: Prabhakar Ragde
Excerpts from a front-page story in today's (Saturday) Toronto Globe
and Mail:
"It is not cream or milk that the employees of Linguagen Corp. add to
their morning java, but a dash of a biological compound that fools
their brain into thinking that black, bitter coffee is as smooth as a
milky double latte [...] Linguagen's 'bitter blocker' compound, which
received a US patent this month, is the first chemical known to
inhibit the taste of bitterness by altering human perception instead
of flavour [...] Dr. Gravina said major interest in their
bitter-blocker has poured in from the coffee world. 'You could have
cheaper beans that taste like more expensive smoother beans.'"
--PR, waiting for comparisons between the doserless Rocky and the Mini
  Mazzer Electronic...
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2) From: Jack Berry
.....or you could just unplug your brain altogether.

3) From: Ben Treichel
Prabhakar Ragde wrote:
<Snip>
The doserless is the same grinder as reviewed at Coffeegeek, and as far 
as I know, the MME is the same as the MM, just a little E on it.
Yes the MM is a little better than the Rocky, but no where close to $150 
better. Just my $0.02 worth.
<Snip>
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4) From: DJ Garcia
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It's just another stupid Jedi mind trick . pretty soon we'll have
contact lenses that make crappy photographs look like Ansel Adams came
back and blessed them.
And we thought virtual reality was mind-imparing!
DJ
Putting his VR goggles back on

5) From: Angelo
I've witnessed (and was involved in a couple of) hypnosis demonstrations 
wherein people were given things like , vinegar, soapy water, etc. and were 
told that they were fine wine, etc. They had the look on their face of pure 
pleasure while they imbibed the swill....
  hehehe
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>
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6) From: John Abbott
listen to the sound of the roaster, nothing but the sound of the roaster.
You are in complete control and can wake up at any time you choose, so relax
and just listen to the sound of the roaster.... You are going down deep,
deep into a coffee world, 5 - you  are smelling wonderful coffee, 4 - you
are anxious to taste this wonderful coffee  3 - you NEED this wonderful
coffee  2- Tom & Maria are wonderful friends  1 - you must relax. Go now and
make wonderful coffee - and when you see coffee beans you will remember this
wonderful taste...   relax.... relax.... relax...

7) From: Angelo
John,
I see you noticed it, too... :-)
A.
<Snip>
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8) From: Michael Vanecek
Here's the link:http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/front/RTGAM/20030201/wxfood0201/Front/homeBN/breakingnewsThis bodes bad both for specialty coffee *and* for organic agriculture. 
One of our organic claims to fame is the wonderful taste our produce has 
compared to the bland grocer produce. Not any more. And now cheap 
robustas and destructively cultivated arabicas will be planted where 
specialty coffee once was because specialty sales could be significantly 
impacted. Ecologically disasterous, and economically damaging to those 
regions. I sincerely hope this doesn't hurt Tom's business...
Cheers,
Mike
Prabhakar Ragde wrote:
<Snip>
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9) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Michael Vanecek  wrote:
<Snip>http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/front/RTGAM/20030201/wxfood0201/Front/homeBN/breakingnews<Snip>
Cheap Robusta are already planted where arabicas won't grow (low
elevation tropics) and destructively cultivated arabicas have
already been planted everywhere that they can be. That's why
prices and quality are so low. The best arabicas still being
grown, very generally speaking, are on steep and forested
hillsides where monculture of technified hybrids is being
abandoned where attempted, do to the impossibilty to use
machinery, and distance from processing plants in areas where
roads wash out every rainy season. Specialty coffee could move
back into some areas, but it's so very much work replanting
shade trees, good varieties of coffee and renewing hard cropped
soil that it won't happen soon. In some places like Chiapas,
Guatamala and Nicaragua some huge estates where broken up after
bancrupcy and abandonment and were sold to cooperative groups of
small producers. Often becomming certified organic and Fair
Trade with some help from abroad they'r still stuck with a lot
of the newer higher yielding full sun hybrids and I, for one,
can't taste much difference from the same varieties
convencionally farmed down the road. Over the long term  they
have more chance of surviving as coffee growers because of lower
cash expenses on chemicals and the ability to plant shade loving
hierlooms as the land recovers.
The linking of high quality arabica ,price wise, with mass
produced agrobiz produced comodity arabica is what is causing
the abandonment of farms growing the tasiest heirloom varieties
in shade. Adding mind confusing drugs with nasty tasting low end
coffee may slow the trend of consumers switching from godawfull
canned coffee to other beverages, but, since this drug can't
fool one's stomach, more people will continue to decide they
can't drink coffee, gives them heartburn etc. The story of the
taste-masking chemicals just makes it more clear than ever that
specialty coffee really is different and deserves more
attention. I see Tom's business increasing, even though more
competition is popping up. Tom seems so far ahead because he's
paid his dues, and because he knows(and loves) coffee, not just
business.
Charlie
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10) From: jim gundlach
On Sunday, February 2, 2003, at 12:05 PM, Michael Vanecek wrote:
<Snip>
If one reads on down a ways it says:
"So far, the company has found the only drawback of adding too much AMP  
to their coffees, either in the mug or the grinds, is that it generates  
the taste of raw fish in your mouth, said scientist Stephen Gravina,  
Linguagen's associate director."
I'd say they have a ways to go before they can make a robusta match any  
of Tom's coffees.
Jim Gundlach
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11) From: DJ Garcia
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
On retrospect, I think we may be making more of this "bitterness
remover" additive than it deserves. Getting rid of one bad aspect in a
coffee dring is one thing, but the coffees we love, we do so because of
what they HAVE, even more so than for what they don't have. So taking a
low-end coffee and getting rid of its inherent bitterness is not going
to transform it into an ISH cup. It's merely going to make it more
bearable, or less offensive if you will. I am actually resting at ease
now.
Cheers,
DJ


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