HomeRoast Digest


Topic: save your pennies! (4 msgs / 98 lines)
1) From: Brian Yarvin
<Snip>
Jim:
While I suspect you're getting a great cup using this method, you 
will soon discover that all this heat is killing your poor little pot!
Try lowering the heat so it takes about five minutes for the coffee to 
start making its' way to the top chamber. Yes, the flavor will be 
somehow different, (every change changes something) but I doubt 
it will be better or worse.
With the money you save by not having to buy a new gasket every 
few months and a new pot a couple of times a year, you can get a 
better grinder - the next big step into coffee mania.
If you fall in love with moka pots in the same way I have, you soon 
find yourself becoming interesting other aspects of Italian home 
cooking - another wonderful mania!
Brian Yarvin
Stock Photography from Edison, NJhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.brianyarvin.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: David Westebbe
<Snip>
I don't understand the "low heat" school of mokka potting.  It seems to me
that it takes time for the heat to travel from the burner through the metal
of the pot to the coffee.  If you use a high heat, the water boils more
quickly, and the excess heat has less time to heat up the top portion of the
pot.  OTOH, if you use a low heat, it takes a longer time for the water to
boil, and the whole pot, including the filter, has plenty of time to heat up
to hundreds of degrees.
If I want something I'm cooking to heat up evenly, like a big turkey, I use
a low heat. If I want only the bottom to heat, like if I'm grilling a steak,
I use a searingly high heat.
If the goal is to heat the water, but not the top portion of the pot, it
makes sense to me to use a high heat, and to get the pot off the flame as
quickly as possible.  Using a low heat, it seems to me, allows the whole
pot, including the coffee grounds, to get hot slowly and evenly.
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3) From: Brian Yarvin
<Snip>
David:
I have no theory behind my statements - just twenty five years of 
serious moka pot brewing.
It's my experience that higher heat kills the pots. I don't know why.
Brian Yarvin
Stock Photography from Edison, NJhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.brianyarvin.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Ed Needham
When I used a moka pot, I always used high heat at first, then reduced it
about the time I expected it to begin it's upward ascent, then removed the
whole thing from the heat and poured before the steam shot through and
spoiled the brew.
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!http://www.homeroaster.comed
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